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Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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The Book as a Whole: Being Faithful

Doña Ana's dueña tells her that Don Juan could never be faithful to any woman. Do you think Don Juan's love would stay true to Dona Ana? Can he really forsake all women for her? Is his view of love realistic?


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Note: This topic refers to the book as a whole.

Stephanie
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smg5775
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: The Book as a Whole: Being Faithful



Stephanie wrote:

Doña Ana's dueña tells her that Don Juan could never be faithful to any woman. Do you think Don Juan's love would stay true to Dona Ana? Can he really forsake all women for her? Is his view of love realistic?

I think Don Juan will be tempted but once he decides that Dona Ana is his one love he will stay faithful. He has a code of honor that rejects hurting others and he knows she wants and needs him to be faithful to her. He also needs someone to believe that he does know what love and fidelity is and will do what is necessary to be faithful.
His view of love may not be realistic. He has romanticized what women want and how they want to be treated but that's okay. I think too many people today are cynics and don't believe that what their partners want and need are as important as their own needs and wants. There is also too much kiss and tell.

Sheila
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Stephanie
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: The Book as a Whole: Being Faithful

Sheila,

I agree - people are cynical, and selfish! I don't think Don Juan will be selfish in his love, he hasn't been selfish in his life as a lover of women, and I'd like to think that will hold true.
Stephanie
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DouglasAbrams
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎05-24-2007
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Re: The Book as a Whole: Being Faithful


smg5775 wrote:


Stephanie wrote:

Doña Ana's dueña tells her that Don Juan could never be faithful to any woman. Do you think Don Juan's love would stay true to Dona Ana? Can he really forsake all women for her? Is his view of love realistic?

I think Don Juan will be tempted but once he decides that Dona Ana is his one love he will stay faithful. He has a code of honor that rejects hurting others and he knows she wants and needs him to be faithful to her. He also needs someone to believe that he does know what love and fidelity is and will do what is necessary to be faithful.
His view of love may not be realistic. He has romanticized what women want and how they want to be treated but that's okay. I think too many people today are cynics and don't believe that what their partners want and need are as important as their own needs and wants. There is also too much kiss and tell.






Dear Sheila,

I'm glad you have faith in the possibility of Don Juan's faithfulness. I agree that people are too often cynical about love. Yes, his new found love may be a little naive as the intoxication of early romance is, but in many ways compassion is the ability to "suffer with" another and love requires us to endure hardships for our love, and in this way I think Don Juan increasingly proves his devotion. Do you agee?
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