Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

The Book as a Whole: The Female Characters

Which of the women in the book was your favorite female character? What did you like about them? Did you identify with any of their struggles? What do you think her life was like after knowing Don Juan?


Reply to this message to discuss any of these topics. Or start your own new topic by clicking "New Message."

Note: This topic refers to the book as a whole.

Stephanie
Frequent Contributor
smg5775
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Book as a Whole: The Female Characters



Stephanie wrote:

Which of the women in the book was your favorite female character? What did you like about them? Did you identify with any of their struggles? What do you think her life was like after knowing Don Juan?

I don't know that any of the females was particularly my favorite. Each had characteristics I could identify with. I think each woman was a part of all women. With the Infanta I could identify with being lonely and unloved by men. With Alma I could identify with wanting to be sexually aware and be able to use that awareness to better prepare myself for a monogamous relationship (she does go back and marry Tomas) as well as learning what pleases her sexually (I've always thought if I could be anyone in the past, I'd like to be a courtesan--they always seemed better educated and freer than society's model of womanhood) and how to be free to be all she can and wants to be. With Dona Ana I could identify with wanting one man to be faithful and want only me. With Maria I could identify with being abused and trying to make the best of it (even as her child is taken from her to be the master's legitimate child with the death of his wife and baby at birth, she is still able to raise her.) With Serena I could identify with the pain of starting over (after leaving her baby at the convent). With Fatima I could identify with losing something important and then having it returned, something she never thought would happen. Each of these women show one or two pieces that is in every woman. Combined they make a whole woman, complex and exciting.

Sheila
Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Book as a Whole: The Female Characters

I have to admit, I loved Serena. From the minute we as readers realized, I wanted her to know that Don Juan was her son, and was glad found out. Difficult for her to lose him twice, but at least she knew who her son was and that she'd been part of his life.
Stephanie
Users Online
Currently online: 44 members 1,088 guests
Recent signins:
Please welcome our newest community members: