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Jessica
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Registered: ‎09-24-2006
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About the Book & Author

[ Edited ]

Dracula by Bram Stoker

Photo: Dracula

A popular bestseller in Victorian England, Stoker's hypnotic tale of the bloodthirsty Count Dracula, whose nocturnal atrocities are symbolic of an evil ages old yet forever new, endures as the quintessential story of suspense and horror. The unbridled lusts and desires, the diabolical cravings that Stoker dramatized with such mythical force, render Dracula resonant and unsettling a century later.

Count Dracula has inspired countless movies, books, and plays. But few, if any, have been fully faithful to Bram Stoker's original, best-selling novel of mystery and horror, love and death, sin and redemption. Dracula chronicles the vampire's journey from Transylvania to the nighttime streets of London. There, he searches for the blood of strong men and beautiful women while his enemies plot to rid the world of his frightful power.

Today's critics see Dracula as a virtual textbook on Victorian repression of the erotic and fear of female sexuality. In it, Stoker created a new word for terror, a new myth to feed our nightmares, and a character who will outlive us all.

About Bram Stoker: Abraham "Bram" Stoker was born in Clontarf, Ireland on November 8th, 1847. After graduating with honors in Mathematics from Trinity College in Dublin, he secured a job at Dublin Castle. During this time, he began publishing stories in magazines. Eight years later, he married and moved to London.

In 1882, Stoker released Under the Sunset (a book of children's stories). His first novel, The Snake's Pass, followed in 1890. Dracula was released in 1897, bringing Stoker world-wide acclaim. Stoker continued to write and be published until his death on April 20th, 1912.

Discover all titles and editions from Bram Stoker.

Message Edited by Jessica on 09-27-2007 04:10 PM

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Peppermill
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Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: About the Book & Author

Here's a site with lots of links related to Bram Stoker and Dracula:

http://www.litgothic.com/Authors/stoker.html

I got almost missed a lunch engagement this morning because I got engaged in watching the slide show of photos on Elizabeth Miller's site -- you can even select the speed at which you want to "flip" through them.

If I remember correctly, I visited that site a year ago and it has increased substantially in enjoyment in a year's time. (And it was good a year ago.)

If not familiar with his story, do take a moment or two with a couple of biographies of Stoker. He is frequently compared with Wilkie Collins. Accounts will undoubtedly contradict each other.

http://www.gradesaver.com/classicnotes/authors/about_bram_stoke.html
http://www.bookpage.com/9604bp/nonfiction/bramstoker.html
http://www.bookrags.com/biography/bram-stoker/
http://www.queensland.co.uk/bram.html (See also Dracula link near bottom)
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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paulgoatallen
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Re: About the Book & Author

Peppermill:
Great links! I've got conflicting feelings about the gradesaver website, though. I'm wondering how many students use that site not as an educational tool but as a way to write an essay or research paper without actually reading the book...
Paul
"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: About the Book & Author


paulgoatallen wrote:
.... I've got conflicting feelings about the gradesaver website, though. I'm wondering how many students use that site not as an educational tool but as a way to write an essay or research paper without actually reading the book...
Paul
The cynic in me replies, "It's their lives, their losses." And maybe someday they will return to the "real thing"?

Glad you enjoyed the links.
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: About the Book & Author

A teaser abstract about the relationship of Stoker and Wilde:

http://muse.jhu.edu/login?uri=/journals/elh/v061/61.2schaffer.html
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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dantheman01
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Registered: ‎12-06-2007
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Re: About the Book & Author

In the late nineteenth century Jonathan Harker who is a solicitor, travels to the Castle Dracula in Transylvania to give information to Count Dracula about his home in London. Dracula takes Jonathan as prisoner and he sees many strange and evil things in the castle before escaping into the night Jonathan thought he was crazy. Then Mina who is Jonathan’s wife is visiting her friend Lucy. Then Dracula goes to London and kills Lucy. Later Dr. Seward who owns asylum next to Dracula tries to treat Lucy’s illness but need help from his mentor Van Helsing he finds out what’s wrong with Lucy but cant help her Van Helsing brings together Mina, Jonathan, Arthur, Quincey, Seward and himself and convinces everyone of the reality of vampires and the danger of this particular one, who was in his human life a great warrior and thinker. They have already destroyed the undead Lucy, and set out to destroy Dracula. They educate themselves about vampires so they can find him and get Dracula in his weakest form so they can kill him. But Dracula attacks Mina will the men are searching for Dracula he feeds Mina with his blood and she will become a vampire herself. They drive Dracula out of London but most kill him so Mina won’t become a vampire. Then before Dracula reaches his castle the team reaches his castle, the entire team descends upon him while he is being transported in his box of Transylvanian earth. Jonathan and Quincey kill him though not before Quincey himself is mortally wounded. With Mina free from her fate the rest return to England and remain lifelong friends
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