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A Look at the Updated Edition

The 75th anniversary edition of Joy of Cooking contains updated chapters on Cocktails, Game, Frozen Desserts, Know Your Ingredients and Brunch, Lunch and Supper. Do you find the inclusion of these updated chapter useful and how? How often do you use the Ingredients chapter and why?

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MaggieGreen
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Re: A Look at the Updated Edition

The Know Your Ingredients chapter from this new edition of Joy is, according to co-author, Ethan Becker, "worth the price of the book". It is alphabetized for the first time, and includes new entries on Lemongrass, Wasabi, Black Bean Sauce, Pasteurized Eggs,Epazote, Gremolata, Sucralose, and Vanilla Paste. If you are only an armchair cook, just reading this chapter will make your mouth water, and you might even learn a thing or two!
Maggie Green
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Joy of Cooking
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theoretical cooking

...armchair cook, LOL, good expression.
ziki
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Re: theoretical cooking

An armchair cook is very similar to an armchair quarterback!
Maggie Green
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Joy of Cooking
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Re: theoretical cooking

[ Edited ]
hehe, there's nothing like getting out there and play for real. Joy is obviously the reliable coach.

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 12-06-200608:19 PM

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MaggieGreen
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Re: A Look at the Updated Edition

From the anniversary edition, I thought I would list some of the favorite holiday recipes:

Bourbon Balls
Brandy Snaps
Cinnamon Stars
Eggnog
Dark Fruitcake
Gingerbread House - a brand new recipe for this edition
Gingerbread Men (or people) - whatever!
Mincemeat
Mock Mince Pie
Mulled Cider
Pecan or Angel Slice - a real JOY classic
Rich Roll Cookies
Springerle
Stollen
Wassail
Yule Log
Peppermint Stick Ice Cream
Chocolate Truffles
Peanut Butter Fudge
and much more....

any holiday memories from anyone they would like to share about any of these recipes?
Maggie Green
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75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
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ChefJon
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Re: A Look at the Updated Edition

Thanks, Maggie, I'll be interested to see readers' reviews as they try these and other recipes from the new JOY! I've not made gingerbread men in years--maybe it's time again. Tomorrow I'm playing in the Tuba Christmas at Rockefeller center (as a teacher I find it's always good to enthusiastically do something you're bad at)--I bet a couple dozen would be appreciated!
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gm's eggnog

[ Edited ]
My grandmother used to make her own eggnog for Christmas. Most likely she used another recipe. In any case I remember that it included rum. Once made the bottle had to 'rest' for a certain period of time and then I was allowed to have a half a pint even as a kid.

I thought the taste was a little 'stingy' but mostly sweet. I guess I could find the recipe she used in her old cook book that I have somewhere.I remember it was hand written on a piece of paper.
But I am still waiting for the Joy book to arrive; then I'll know what recipe is used there and compare. I'll be back later.

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 12-10-200602:19 PM

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UK Christmas pudding

[ Edited ]
I am deviating from the Joy topic a little but in UK they have a Christmas pudding. A dark boiled (?) cake with a lot of dried fruit. I never tried to make it, did anyone else?
In Germany the typical Christmas cake/bread would be stolle.

ziki

PS
There are many different recipes on the net, this is just one of many.
---------
Later:
And sure now after I've got the cookbook I see that there is a recipe for plum pudding in Joy, too. Great.
-------

Christmas Pudding



Ingredients
l lb of each: raisins, currants, golden raisins, breadcrumbs, brown sugar
8oz Suet
4oz each: Mixed peel, glace cherries chopped, almonds chopped
1 each: Lemon - grate rind, orange - grate rind, carrot - grated, apple - grated
1 tbs Flour
1 tsp mixed spice
Pinch salt
6-8 Eggs
10oz stout (bottle) or dark beer (Guiness is good)
OR 5 ozs each brandy & milk.

Preparation
Mix dry ingredients first then mix with lightly beaten eggs & liquid. Grease the bottom of a bowl large enough to hold pudding and press mixture into it. Place wax paper over the top and then foil over that, crimping it around the edges to keep firm. Either cook for 2 hours in pressure cooker with about 2 inches water or put in pan with water on stove for 4 hours. Keep checking water in pan to prevent burning. Store well wrapped for as long as possible for better flavor. Some people make them one year to eat the next. Donated by sister Margaret Hawksley Serve with hot custard, cream, or brandy sauce.

Why steam for so long? Christmas puddings are quite dense because of all the fruit, nuts, etc. they contain. Steaming is the best method of cooking because it allows a slow cooking which ensures a moist and palatable result (cakes being less dense can cook for less time and still remain moist, so baking is the best method). If you used a faster cooking method for a Christmas pudding you would get a crusty pudding. A pudding steamed for 2 hours, rather than 4, would probably still have some uncooked mixture in the center. So, while the cooking time obviously depends on the size of the pudding. (This is when it is cooked on the stove - not the pressure cooker)

Message Edited by ziki on 12-13-200611:31 PM

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Re: A Look at the Updated Edition



BookClubEditor wrote:

The 75th anniversary edition of Joy of Cooking contains updated chapters on Cocktails, Game, Frozen Desserts, Know Your Ingredients and Brunch, Lunch and Supper. Do you find the inclusion of these updated chapter useful and how? How often do you use the Ingredients chapter and why?





I like that all these chapters were included. I seldom drink alcohol, nevertheless, I like the basics of the coctails and drinks selection.

Same with game. No big chance I get to practice that section but I had a friend who married a guy who often went hunting.He was a journalist and later editor in chief in a hunter's magazine. He brought home all kind of "feathery and furred dead creatures" and she had quite some headache with what to do with it all. Slowly she learned to handle it. On such occasion the information is very useful.

I am glad that the ingredience section was included because it explains stuff that I am not familiar with. It is fun to read and learn more.

Brunch, Lunch and Supper section offers quick meals.I didn't study that much in detail yet but it seems to be good for ideas. And with the frozen stuff I am going to experiment. I am not much for sweets and sugar and I do not have an ice cream machine but I like the idea of making the frozen deserts at home without preservatives.

I feel that the book is complete and well composed, also as an aniversary edition. Down to earth but with wide scope (not to mention the high altitude cooking section).
Quite an achievent to find such a balance IMHO.

ziki
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Maggie's suggestions

All these suggestions seem very tasty, Maggie.

I have many different recipes for ginger dough but two are winners. For making the house it is better when the dough is a bit sturdy but for cookies I have one that is easy to make and it is crispy and tastes good. If you are interested tell me and I post it.

Perhaps I'll try to make the candies from Joy to test some of the recipes and I'll turn them into Christmas or go away gifts putting them into some nice home made paper cones.

ziki :-)
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