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right , it's here!

[ Edited ]

MaggieGreen wrote:
Washing the orange will help to remove some of the chemical, but possibly not all of them. Ziki, you must be looking through your copy of JOY. Did it arrive in the mail?




yes yes, :-) I posted about it under the first topic..intro...I am very happy and enthusiastic about the book!!!

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 12-12-200612:06 AM

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? p. 649 buckwheat crepes

[ Edited ]
Hi,
buckwheat pancakes....I heard that in Nepal they make them just with buckwheat and water.
Do you think it would work well enough to take just 1 cup buckwheat flour?

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 12-12-200605:57 PM

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MaggieGreen
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Re: ? p. 649 buckwheat crepes

Hi Ziki,

I'm not sure I understand your question, but would be happy to help in any way I can if you can rephrase the question!
Maggie Green
Editor
75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
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Re: ? p. 649 buckwheat crepes

OK.
On p.649 there is a recipe for buckwheat crepes. It suggests that we use half a cup buckwheat flour and half a cup all purpose flour. Because I heard that in Nepal they make these pancakes using just buckwheat and water I wondered if I instead could use just one cup of buckwheat flour.

I think they often make these buckwheat pancakes in Brittany, France, too.

I guess I could just try it and see how that comes out.

ziki

PS

from: www.food-nepal.com
Phapar Ko Roti (Buckwheat Pancakes)
by Tsering Maya

Ingredients

Buckwheat flour
Water
Non-stick pan

Preparation
1 In a bowl, place the amount of buckwheat flour that you feel you will be comfortable handling. Slowly pour in water, little by little, with one hand while mixing with a spatula with the other hand. This way you can adjust as needed. By pouring water little by little you don't have to deal with big lumps later on.
2 When the mix resembles a pancake batter, it's ready. However, you can make the batter thicker or thinner as per your preference.
3 Now, heat the non-stick pan on medium heat. You can want to make sure it is thoroughly heated before you pour any batter as that would prevent the pancake from sticking to the pan. Notice we are not using any grease.
4 Still on medium heat, slowly pour a cup or so full of batter into the pan and tilt the pan around to distribute the batter into a nice round shape. Wait for bubbles to appear within the pancake and with another spatula check around the edges to see if the pancake separates from the pan.
5 If it does, then it is ready to be flipped. Let it cook for a few minutes more and pancake is ready. Although traditionally eaten with fresh radish pickle or plain chili powder moistened with butter tea, it also goes well smeared with peanut butter and jam.
Number of Servings:
More about Buckwheat:

* Buckwheat is one of the primary sources of carbohydrate among the Manangis of Northern central Nepal where the land is dry and the weather leaning towards mountain-cold.
* This serves two purposes: you can't grow rice there but you can buckwheat; the pink flowers of which beautify the barren landscape during spring. And buckwheat is a heat producing agent which serves well for these perpetually butter-tea drinking denizens.
* Buckwheat pancakes are regularly eaten for breakfast and also prepared during large gatherings; at the monasteries and during major events like weddings, funerals etc.
* More than half of the entire tiny population of the Manangi villages have relocated to other areas and other countries but buckwheat pancakes still remain dear to them and are eaten regularly.
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Re: ? p. 649 buckwheat crepes

Hi Ziki,

They will work but will be very fragile. Wheat flour has gluten which is important to structure. You certainly use 100% buckwheat but they may be crumbly. My recommendation is to make them thin, use enough cooking fat and a nonstick pan and you should be OK. Let us know how it goes!
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buckwheat crepes-result

[ Edited ]
Hi Jon,

the buckwheat pancakes were OK when warm but they have to be eaten immediately otherwise they become tough like a leather shoe sole (that inspite of using milk and egg in the batter, not water). I'll try the Nepal way, too, just out of curiosity. However, Nepal perhaps falls into the category of high altitude cooking...

I'll experiment further with different flour mixtures i.e.buckwheat and rice flour.It can possibly produce a better result.

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 12-20-200610:57 PM

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? cooking with wine/beer

I tried the basic stew (p.479) and it came out fine. However, I didn't use the wine and I wonder what adding wine alternatively beer does to the taste of the stew?

Another thing I wonder is what will be the difference if I dredge the meat in flour before browning it or if I brown the meat as it is. Does it change the taste of the meat or does it thicken the sauce?


(I followed the cooking time but in this particular case it was a tad too long. Longer than I usually cook such meat so I mainly wondered what the longer time would do. Now I know, the meat starts falling apart into threads.LOL)

ziki
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Re: ? cooking with wine/beer



ziki wrote:
I tried the basic stew (p.479) and it came out fine. However, I didn't use the wine and I wonder what adding wine alternatively beer does to the taste of the stew?

Another thing I wonder is what will be the difference if I dredge the meat in flour before browning it or if I brown the meat as it is. Does it change the taste of the meat or does it thicken the sauce?


(I followed the cooking time but in this particular case it was a tad too long. Longer than I usually cook such meat so I mainly wondered what the longer time would do. Now I know, the meat starts falling apart into threads.LOL)

ziki


Hi Ziki, Beer or wine in the stew will add some flavor, sweetness and acidity, especially as they reduce during cooking. There's nothing wrong with using other liquid--stock, broth, water instead but you might find you need to compensate with something sweet like sugar, fruit juice, tomatoes, or carrots and some acidity like lemon, vinegar, hot sauce, etc. There's no right or wrong but basically the more flavorful ingredients you put in, the more you'll get out.

Regarding the flour, it's important later in thickening the broth as the stew cooks. Browning flour-coated meat also adds a rich nutty flavor and color. But if you're avoiding flour, nearly any starch--corn starch, potato starch, rice flour, will do. If you want to avoid this altogether you can use a veggie puree or starchy vegetables to give it some body.

Cooking times for stews are tough in a recipe. Professional recipes often don't have times but say "until fork tender, about 90 - 150 minutes" for example. Because there are so many factors--age of the meat, cooking temp, type of pot, etc., there can be a long window. In general "fork tender" meat is done. It should yield easily to the fork and be moist. After that, as you note, it starts to string off the bone, which can still be yummy, and after that it moves toward stringy and dry.

If you can make a good basic stew it's a template for so many other dishes. Yum!
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Re: ? cooking with wine/beer

Thank you very much for your answer, that clarifies a lot. I will try the dijon mustard white wine stew next. I never brought my cooking to the level of the "taste tuning". It is like with learning a new language, there are steps; perhaps one can make oneself understood but can't yet read a book etc.

ziki
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Re: ? cooking with wine/beer

[ Edited ]

ChefJon wrote:smileyembarrassed:Regarding the flour, it's important later in thickening the broth as the stew cooks. Browning flour-coated meat also adds a rich nutty flavor and color. But if you're avoiding flour, nearly any starch--corn starch, potato starch, rice flour, will do.




Aha, I just thickened the sauce at the end but I will experiment with your suggestions.
I also made the stew with potatoes and carrots and parsnips all added at the end as suggested in the recipe. That worked well, it didn't get mushy.

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 12-22-200611:20 PM

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Re: ? cooking with wine/beer



ziki wrote:
Thank you very much for your answer, that clarifies a lot. I will try the dijon mustard white wine stew next. I never brought my cooking to the level of the "taste tuning". It is like with learning a new language, there are steps; perhaps one can make oneself understood but can't yet read a book etc.

ziki


Thanks for your comments, Ziki. For me it's the difference between reading sheet music and improvising. If you give me a piece of music, I can get through it. If it's easy enough I may even be able to make it sound good and add some nuances. But ask me to improvise and you can just forget it.

With cooking, give me an ingredient and I'm off and running. I'm working a lot in my teaching and writing to try to get culinary students and home cooks to be more improvisational. A lot of it, like in music, is in knowing basics, taking risks, and adjusting as you go...
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food and art

[ Edited ]
This is very interesting the co-relation between food and art. Once a teacher said painting has a lot to do with cooking. And I know for sure cooking has a lot to do with color and texture, shapes ....all creates a kind of music, tempo etc.

I am not sure if it would be possible to prove scientifically but food cooked with love and interest tastes better than one prepared without any care :-)


ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 12-24-200605:19 PM

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