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BN Editor
BookClubEditor
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Registered: ‎10-20-2006
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Unusual Cooking Methods

Joy of Cooking contains updated and new information on some unusual cooking methods -- hearth cooking, slow cooking, pit cooking, hot and cold smoking, using natural dyes, tempering chocolate, making your own butter -- just to name a few. Have you ever tried any of these methods? What did you make, and how did it turn out? What other unusual cooking methods have you tried? Share your experiences with the group.

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MaggieGreen
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Re: Unusual Cooking Methods

One of the most unusual cooking methods in the new edition of JOY is a section on Hearth or Fireplace Cooking. We added this section with the help of a specialist in this type of cookery, William Ruebel. He has his own book called The Magic of the Fire. When one uses their fireplace to cook, very little special equipment is needed. It can be as simple as placing a large pot of beans or stew next to the fire, and with an occasional stir the fire in your fireplace becomes a source of heat for a wonderful meal. Also discussed is burying vegetables such as peppers, eggplant and onions in the embers and roasting meat on a string. This is not everyday cooking, and falls under the unusual category, but as Ethan Becker says, why go out and start the grill on a cold winter night when you have a fire built in your fireplace. Has anyone ever cooked in this fashion?
Maggie Green
Editor
75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
Frequent Contributor
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Re: Unusual Cooking Methods



MaggieGreen wrote:
One of the most unusual cooking methods in the new edition of JOY is a section on Hearth or Fireplace Cooking. We added this section with the help of a specialist in this type of cookery, William Ruebel. He has his own book called The Magic of the Fire. When one uses their fireplace to cook, very little special equipment is needed. It can be as simple as placing a large pot of beans or stew next to the fire, and with an occasional stir the fire in your fireplace becomes a source of heat for a wonderful meal. Also discussed is burying vegetables such as peppers, eggplant and onions in the embers and roasting meat on a string. This is not everyday cooking, and falls under the unusual category, but as Ethan Becker says, why go out and start the grill on a cold winter night when you have a fire built in your fireplace. Has anyone ever cooked in this fashion?




No, I didn't. However, it reminds me of cooking on camp fire. Everything got very black.
ziki
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BookJunkie
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Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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Re: Unusual Cooking Methods

We used to wrap potatoes in a few strong layers of tin foil and throw them in the fireplace. I remember feeling very reckless and excited about making dinner that way. (I haven't thought of this in years ... thanks!)
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christiei
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Registered: ‎12-01-2006
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Re: Unusual Cooking Methods

I absolutely LOVE cooking on Dutch Ovens, but have only had the opportunity to do so when we have a bonfire at our country property, etc. (I don't camp!) I learned when I worked at a historic museum that did reenactments of pioneer life. I plan to have a large hearth cooking fireplace someday, open into the kitchen. I wish I could show you a photo of the cooking fireplace at the museum, which I would like to replicate. FUN!!!
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MaggieGreen
Posts: 52
Registered: ‎11-09-2006
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Re: Unusual Cooking Methods

It would be interesting to see that photo, but I'm not sure there exists a capability to share photos on this discussion board. Sorry... but one idea would be to be part of our Joy of Cooking community at thejoykitchen.com, and maybe you can share the photo on that site when it's up and running?

Dutch ovens are a wonderful cooking vessel, and one that gets much use here in my home - but mostly on my gas range, not in the fireplace!
Maggie Green
Editor
75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
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