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BookClubEditor
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What's on your Thanksgiving Menu?

Whether you're hosting Thanksgiving dinner at your house, or attending the feast somewhere else, what's on the menu? Reply to this message to ask for suggestions on how to liven up your standard Thanksgiving dishes, or to share some time-honored family recipes and traditions of your own.
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ChefJon
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Re: What's on your Thanksgiving Menu?

I thought that because we're featuring JOY in the clubs I'd make the roast brined turkey (p. 443) from the book this year. It's a little boring, or, to be polite, straightforward, so I'll probably add some serious garlic and herbs and some bitter orange juice which keeps things lively. One of the things I really like about JOY is that the recipes for items like this one (and items like the leftover pasta casserole also come to mind) serve as good stand-alone recipes but also as templates that can be filled in creatively.
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BookJunkie
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Re: What's on your Thanksgiving Menu?

I'm definitely going to try the Becker Brussel Sprouts (Joy, p. 262). I love brussel sprouts, but usually just default to butter/salt/pepper, so the garlic and parmesan here sounds like a great twist!

The only thing I think I'll change is, I might try this in a wok -- I'm cooking for 14 people (lawdamercy!), and need to find a way to brown large quantities of these things at one time.

Anyone ever made brussel sprouts in a wok before??
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MaggieGreen
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Re: What's on your Thanksgiving Menu?

I will be sure to tell Ethan that you might try the Becker Brussels Sprouts for Thanksgiving. It is a wonderful recipe, and a unique treatment for this most unappreciated vegetable. The caramelization of the brussels sprout that occurs when the flat/cut side of the sprout is cooked is part of the treat, so I'm not really sure how well it would work in a wok. You can always give it a try, but be sure to report back!
Maggie Green
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75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
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ChefJon
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Re: What's on your Thanksgiving Menu?



BookJunkie wrote:
I'm definitely going to try the Becker Brussel Sprouts (Joy, p. 262). I love brussel sprouts, but usually just default to butter/salt/pepper, so the garlic and parmesan here sounds like a great twist!

The only thing I think I'll change is, I might try this in a wok -- I'm cooking for 14 people (lawdamercy!), and need to find a way to brown large quantities of these things at one time.

Anyone ever made brussel sprouts in a wok before??




Thanks for drawing my attention to that recipe. Yum! This was my first season of urban gardening and brussels sprouts were by far my most successful crop (Italian cherry peppers did well too).

Regarding browning, even in a wok you risk steaming and getting mush unless you have a heavy-duty stove with a lot of heat. The best way to brown brussels sprouts, or just about anything, for a large crowd is to spread them on a baking sheet with a little oil or other fat and roast them with high heat (425 or 450--watch for burning). Then, if you like, you can transfer them to a pan and continue with the recipe or just make it entirely in the oven.

Good luck with your big crowd! I have 10 and that's quite enough!
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MaggieGreen
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Re: What's on your Thanksgiving Menu?

I am heading south for the Thanksgiving holiday with my family. I shopped on Monday, and have been busy in the kitchen ever since, cooking from JOY. Although I am not responsible for the turkey, I am contributing the following JOY delights to the meal:

Cooked Cranberry Relish
Whole Green Beans (with my own additions of bacon and shallots)
Apple and Cherry Bread Stuffing
No-Knead Refrigerator Rolls
Mock Mince Pie
Pumpkin Pie

I'd love to know what you are making for Thanksgiving. Please share...
Maggie Green
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75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
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ChefJon
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Re: What's on your Thanksgiving Menu?

I think you can learn so much about someone from their menus! That sounds delicious! I work very last minute so just have mine together:

Salad with dried cranberries, candied pecans and popcorn (a kid favorite, the toppings anyway)
The Brined Roast Turkey from JOY (with some extra garlic in the mix)
Cornbread Sausage Stuffing
Braised Chard--the last thing standing in my garden
Pureed Roast Butternut Squash
Beet Salad
Cranberry Tangerine Sauce
Brooklyn Backyard Hot Pepper Sauce
No Knead Bread--I see a theme here!

Pumpkin Pie
Peanut Butter Brownies

Wine, wine and more wine!
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BookJunkie
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Re: What's on your Thanksgiving Menu?

Hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving. My Becker Brussel Sprouts turned out great (I ended up browning them in a large skillet, after all). In addition to that, I made fresh cranberry orange sauce, sweet potatoes (mashed, with yucca, with sweet roasted pecans crumbled on top), and my great grandmother's stuffing (bread, thyme, onion, butter, stock ... the best). What a feast!

Can't wait for Christmas dinner...
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MaggieGreen
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Re: What's on your Thanksgiving Menu?

I'll be sure to pass along to Ethan your love for the Brussels Sprouts. That particular recipe always creates 'brussels sprout converts'. We've started a discussion in another thread about Holiday recipes, so please join us.

I'm curious - was this the first time you cooked Yucca, or do you cook it regularly? Any tips or hints?
Maggie Green
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75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
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Re: What's on your Thanksgiving Menu?



BookJunkie wrote:
Hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving. My Becker Brussel Sprouts turned out great (I ended up browning them in a large skillet, after all). In addition to that, I made fresh cranberry orange sauce, sweet potatoes (mashed, with yucca, with sweet roasted pecans crumbled on top), and my great grandmother's stuffing (bread, thyme, onion, butter, stock ... the best). What a feast!

Can't wait for Christmas dinner...




I sure sounds really tasty...
ziki
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BookJunkie
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Yucca

[ Edited ]
I love to include one big yucca (aka cassava) into either mashed sweet potatoes or regular potatoes. Yucca has a sweet & nutty flavor that complements those dishes. I just peel it, cut it into ~1" cubes, boil it until it's soft (it's tougher than potatoes ... more like plantains), then mash it in with everything else.

You can also fry yucca the same way you'd fry plantains for tostones. Another easy one to try is yucca chips (slice thin on a mandoline, quickly fry in garlic & oil, drain, add salt, pig out.)

My mother in law makes fufu, which is a boiled, pounded yucca usually served with fish sauce or okra sauce. She also has a great recipe for cassava greens (boiled with palm oil and spices). So yummy! Both are traditional central African recipes.

I'll visit the holiday recipes thread!

Message Edited by BookJunkie on 11-30-200611:54 AM

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ChefJon
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Re: Yucca

Yucca french fries also come out great (don't tell them I said this over at the Fast Food Nation club).
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MaggieGreen
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Re: Yucca

Thank you for the yucca cooking tips, and for sharing them with us!
Maggie Green
Editor
75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
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