Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
BN Editor
BookClubEditor
Posts: 546
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
0 Kudos

Which Edition Do You Own?

It is not uncommon for someone to think they own the "original" Joy of Cooking. Which edition(s) do you own? Tell us what edition you have and we'll talk more specifically about the 1931, 1943, 1946, 1951, 1964, 1975, and 1997 editions of Joy.

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

1975 and 1997

I used to have a copy of the 1975 edition, but I now have a copy of the 1997 edition. It was a long wait in between, but the newer edition was certainly worth waiting for!



BookClubEditor wrote:

It is not uncommon for someone to think they own the "original" Joy of Cooking. Which edition(s) do you own? Tell us what edition you have
and we'll talk more specifically about the 1931, 1943, 1946, 1951, 1964, 1975, and 1997 editions of Joy.


Frequent Contributor
ChefJon
Posts: 264
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: 1975 and 1997



pmath wrote:
I used to have a copy of the 1975 edition, but I now have a copy of the 1997 edition. It was a long wait in between, but the newer edition was certainly worth waiting for!



BookClubEditor wrote:

It is not uncommon for someone to think they own the "original" Joy of Cooking. Which edition(s) do you own? Tell us what edition you have
and we'll talk more specifically about the 1931, 1943, 1946, 1951, 1964, 1975, and 1997 editions of Joy.







What do you prefer about the 1997 edition?
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

1997 edition v. 1975 edition

I prefer the way everything I've made using recipes from the 1997 edition tastes to what I've made using recipes from the 1975 edition. I also think the 1997 edition is more varied and interesting!


ChefJon wrote:

What do you prefer about the 1997 edition?

pmath wrote:

I used to have a copy of the 1975 edition, but I now have a copy of the 1997 edition. It was a long wait in between, but the newer edition was certainly worth waiting for!

BookClubEditor wrote:

It is not uncommon for someone to think they own the "original" Joy of Cooking. Which edition(s) do you own? Tell us what edition you have
and we'll talk more specifically about the 1931, 1943, 1946, 1951, 1964, 1975, and 1997 editions of Joy.




Author
MaggieGreen
Posts: 52
Registered: ‎11-09-2006
0 Kudos

Re: 1997 edition v. 1975 edition

The 1997 edition of JOY has some wonderful recipes, that is a fact. Many of those recipes can be found in the 75th Anniversary Edition of JOY as well, plus the classic reference material which was sadly missing from that revision.
Maggie Green
Editor
75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
Frequent Contributor
jessicaabruno
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎11-15-2006
0 Kudos

Re: 1997 edition v. 1975 edition

Maggie,

I own the latest one (75th Anniversary Edition, 2006) and love it so far.

Thank you.

Jessica
Jessica A Bruno (waybeyondfedup)
Author
MaggieGreen
Posts: 52
Registered: ‎11-09-2006
0 Kudos

Re: 1997 edition v. 1975 edition

Jessica,

I am glad you purchased the 75th Anniversary edition. It will be a true friend in the kitchen. Happy cooking, and Happy Thanksgiving,

Maggie
Maggie Green
Editor
75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
Frequent Contributor
jessicaabruno
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎11-15-2006
0 Kudos

Re: 1997 edition v. 1975 edition

Maggie,

Thank you, again.
Jessica A Bruno (waybeyondfedup)
Frequent Contributor
ChefJon
Posts: 264
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: 1997 edition v. 1975 edition



jessicaabruno wrote:
Maggie,

I own the latest one (75th Anniversary Edition, 2006) and love it so far.

Thank you.

Jessica




Hi Jessica,

Can you tell us what you like about it? What you don't? What you've cooked from it so far?
Frequent Contributor
jessicaabruno
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎11-15-2006
0 Kudos

Re: 1997 edition v. 1975 edition



ChefJon wrote:


jessicaabruno wrote:
Maggie,

I own the latest one (75th Anniversary Edition, 2006) and love it so far.

Thank you.

Jessica




Hi Jessica,

Can you tell us what you like about it? What you don't? What you've cooked from it so far?




chefjon,

I really haven't looked thoughy, spl though threw the book yet. So its hard for me to tell you what I like and hate about it. So far, I made banana bread with my mom and it turn out it good.

Thank you.
Jessica A Bruno (waybeyondfedup)
Frequent Contributor
ChefJon
Posts: 264
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: 1997 edition v. 1975 edition

Thanks, Jessica--one of the things that really interests me--and that drives some cookbook authors nuts--is that we don't really know what people do with the books once they buy them (or borrow them from the library or a friend). Do they cook from them closely, flip through them, cook one or two favorites, read them as they would read a novel? Some combination? So I'm enjoying hearing people's thoughts on JOY (editions past and present) and how they use it. For me, it's a go to book when I have an ingredient I want to use but don't have a clear vision for what I want to do with it. I'm interested to see what others have to say as well.
Frequent Contributor
jessicaabruno
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎11-15-2006
0 Kudos

Re: 1997 edition v. 1975 edition



ChefJon wrote:
Thanks, Jessica--one of the things that really interests me--and that drives some cookbook authors nuts--is that we don't really know what people do with the books once they buy them (or borrow them from the library or a friend). Do they cook from them closely, flip through them, cook one or two favorites, read them as they would read a novel? Some combination? So I'm enjoying hearing people's thoughts on JOY (editions past and present) and how they use it. For me, it's a go to book when I have an ingredient I want to use but don't have a clear vision for what I want to do with it. I'm interested to see what others have to say as well.




John,

Thank you and I'm with you on what you said here.

Thank you.
Jessica A Bruno (waybeyondfedup)
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

1997 or 75th?

[ Edited ]
What is the main difference between the 1997 edition and the 75th aniversary?

I do not own any Joy of Cooking yet but I'm planning to get one.


I was inspired by the discussion about the pound cake here. I am reading To Kill a Mocking Bird and the main character Scout was just offered to take home some poundcake, LOL.
I also liked the sample chapter where attention was payed to how to obtain good sources of protein in the diet. I struggled with that quite a lot in practice.

What do people do with their cookbooks wonders Chef Jon?

Well, I have many cookbooks and I use them relatively rarely. Some recipes I follow to the T but I can also use them just for inspiration and vary the recipes depending on what I have available. Also lately (boringly enough) I have to make some alternations depending on my new dietary requirements (no gluten).

I was vegetarian for many years and when I started to eat meat again I didn't know how to cook it. A good cook book was instrumental in that case.

Other cookbooks I use for learning, that is when it comes to i.e. oriental or Indian cooking or a use of rare or to me unknown ingrediences.

One inspiring book was World Food Café's cook book (WFC is a place in London). That one can just read for fun. And also the cook book BNU featured previously for a course A New Way of Cooking was inspiring because it placed so much emphasis on taste.

As time progresses I usually fall into some habitual cooking/eating groove and a new cook book can bring me out of it by presenting some fresh ideas and suggest a well neded change.
I also miss the cooking of my mother and grandmother. They took their specialities with them to the grave. I guess it also includes the priviledge to be cooked for because I tried but I can't quite repeat their master pieces myself. I am simply good at making other stuff.

Cooking for others can be fun. However, once a thought of cooking for others was a sheer nightmare for me. I was just too afraid of it, thinking I couldn't possibly suit other people's taste. In time I learned to trust my abilities. Nevertheless,I am often unable to repeat the deed. Instead the new 'tastes' will emerge all the time. Such is life, a momentary unrepeatable happening said my spiritual adviser but my mate complained bitterly, LOL. Cooking is a living creative task.

If I would decide to cook all the recipes I have in my cookbooks only once, one life time would not be enough, LOL.

And yet I am hankering for Joy of Cooking now....what will the world come to?

ziki :-)

Message Edited by ziki on 11-27-200602:29 AM

Author
MaggieGreen
Posts: 52
Registered: ‎11-09-2006
0 Kudos

Re: 1997 or 75th?

Ziki,

The best thing about owning a Joy of Cooking, is that it can answer almost all questions related to cooking methods or ingredients, or provide a basic recipe for things such as pound cake, a flourless chocolate torte, or many delicious vegetarian dishes which are all indexed under Vegetarian cuisine. It is a friend in the kitchen, with it's conversation tone, and handy answers. I highly recommend the anniversary edition for yourself or for a gift. When we wrote and edited this book, we had people just like you in mind, with a wide variety of cooking interests and needs. Thanks for your post!
Maggie Green
Editor
75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

75th

Thank you Maggie for your answer, 75th aniversary edition it'll be then :-)

ziki
Frequent Contributor
gwillis01
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Which Edition Do You Own?

1975 edition in plastic ring-bound format, so I can read the book while cooking. I had an earlier edition--sometime in the late 1950's in hard cover, which I gave away to my older daughter who doesn't use recipes anyway. I find the information basic and informative.
Gwin Willis
New User
Sheshat
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Which Edition Do You Own?

I own two copies of the 1975 edition; one is for show, the other is the one I use. I dip into the cookbook probably 20 or 30 times a year. For example, my husband expressed a desire for roast duck this past Christmas. I found a duck, and then I turned to Joy to find out how to cook it. It was delicious. FOr New year's brunch, I decided on Huevos Rancheros, and my first stop was Joy! Any time I want to try something new, I use Joy!
Users Online
Currently online: 17 members 581 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: