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bdNM
Posts: 470
Registered: ‎11-22-2006
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Don Quixote: Book I, chs 9-10

Here we begin the second part of Book I, and rather interestingly too.  Ch. 8 ended in mid-battle between Don Quixote and a Basque, with Cervantes apologizing because his source stopped here, and that he vows to find more information and bring the account of this battle to a close -- if this were Dickens, many of whose novels were published in serial form initially, that conclusion of ch. 8 would make sense -- it's sort of a comic variation of a cliff-hanger.  If the work were published only as a whole, that device seems a bit more peculiar (though I must say I found it quite enjoyable).  Dulcinea -- was the work initially distributed in smaller parts, so far as you know? 

Here Cervantes tells of another account of Don Quixote he came upon, one written by the Arab historian, Cide Hamete Benengeli, which Rutherford's notes explain as follows -- that Cide means "Lord," Hamete is a Spanish variant of Hamed, and Benengeli means "aubergine (or eggplant) eater," and that aubergine was a favorite food in Toledo. 

What are your thoughts of the battle with the Basque?  What about the level of misunderstanding between the two? 

 

Dignity, always dignity.
Correspondent
rbehr
Posts: 354
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Basque Battle and Boise

[ Edited ]

I don't know if the battle was a slam on the Basque's or just another episode in DQ and Sancho's wanderings.  

 

On another point, I started looking up some background information on Basques and was surprised to see this link on the Basques of Boise, Idaho.

Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Basques & Windmills.

[ Edited ]

Here are Guiridi's Ten Basque Melodies from an Adventure with Don Quixote to help us on our journey:smileyhappy:.

 

Here is some background on the Basques, who are still fighting for their independence today.  Apparently Basque sailors were part of Columbus' crew so y'all may be descended from them:smileyhappy:.  They have a fierce reputation as fighters and perhaps DQ's defeat of the Basque was wishful thinking on the part of Cervantes, who was a Galician. They are also a very religious people and the Catholic Jesuit order was founded by the Basque Ignatius Loyala.   

 

In this online book, Cervantes and Modernity, you will find some references to the Basque incident and even more interestingly, in the section Windmills and Moors, some comparisons with Dante's DC and DQ, which the author says 'owes much' to the DC. He quotes 'a windmill seems to wheel when far off'' etc from Dante's Inferno in support of this thesis, Satan's torso being the windmill. He also writes of the European tradition of placing windmills in the background of nativity scenes.  Worth a read!

Reader-Moderator
bdNM
Posts: 470
Registered: ‎11-22-2006

Re: Basques & Windmills.

 


Choisya wrote:

Here are Guiridi's Ten Basque Melodies from an Adventure with Don Quixote to help us on our journey:smileyhappy:.

 

Here is some background on the Basques, who are still fighting for their independence today.  Apparently Basque sailors were part of Columbus' crew so y'all may be descended from them:smileyhappy:.  They have a fierce reputation as fighters and perhaps DQ's defeat of the Basque was wishful thinking on the part of Cervantes, who was a Galician. They are also a very religious people and the Catholic Jesuit order was founded by the Basque Ignatius Loyala.   

 

In this online book, Cervantes and Modernity, you will find some references to the Basque incident and even more interestingly, in the section Windmills and Moors, some comparisons with Dante's DC and DQ, which the author says 'owes much' to the DC. He quotes 'a windmill seems to wheel when far off'' etc from Dante's Inferno in support of this thesis, Satan's torso being the windmill. He also writes of the European tradition of placing windmills in the background of nativity scenes.  Worth a read!


 

 

Thanks for the link, C.  Cervantes in breaking off the narrative in the middle and then spending pages describing his own efforts to figure out how to continue is very much a modernist idea -- it's not just telling the story, but calling attention to the artificiality of storytelling.  I like it, but I find it a bit puzzling.  For the way that Cervantes says that he is putting this narrative together from other, even Arabic sources suggests that DQ is himself long gone, and yet, in the second part of the story, people will react to the "real" Don Q based on what they've heard or read of him (as in the first part).  That suggests that DQ is a contemporary of Cervantes, but this searching for other materials suggest a figure of the past, not present. 

 

What about this magic Balsam of Fierabras that DQ tells Sancho that he can make?  This magic potion seems to be a figment of the don's imagination, but it is something he seems to believe in -- later when he and Sancho have some of this magic balm, it doesn't seem to have any real effect on DQ and makes Sancho ill, so that DQ is forced to consider that the stuff may not work on squires.  Wild stuff.

 

Another question -- why are the gendarmes that Sancho and DQ want to avoid called the Holy Brotherhood?  Are they an arm of the Catholic Church?

 

Dignity, always dignity.