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Everyman
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On The Man who was Thursday

I strongly suggest not reading any reviews of this book which reveal the plot until after you have read the book once through. This point came to mind when I read the article on Chesterton in the latest New Yorker. It reveals totally the plot and "secrets" of the book. If you haven't read the book, and plan to for the discussion here, you might want to skip that article for the time being.

For many books knowing the plot in advance may not matter so much, and may even be helpful (War and Peace is perhaps one such), but my experience with TMWWT is that much of the power of the book is not knowing where it is going, but experiencing it along with Syme and not knowing more than he knows. The book isn't long, more novella than novel length, so it can be read in a few evenings.

JMHO.
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Laurel
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Re: On The Man who was Thursday

You're right. This is a book you need to read through to the end to know exactly (sort of) what is going on. It is, in one sense, a who-dun-it.

Everyman wrote:
I strongly suggest not reading any reviews of this book which reveal the plot until after you have read the book once through. This point came to mind when I read the article on Chesterton in the latest New Yorker. It reveals totally the plot and "secrets" of the book. If you haven't read the book, and plan to for the discussion here, you might want to skip that article for the time being.

For many books knowing the plot in advance may not matter so much, and may even be helpful (War and Peace is perhaps one such), but my experience with TMWWT is that much of the power of the book is not knowing where it is going, but experiencing it along with Syme and not knowing more than he knows. The book isn't long, more novella than novel length, so it can be read in a few evenings.

JMHO.


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
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Re: On The Man who was Thursday

It's a very strange book -- I can't imagine how the discussion will go!

Laurel wrote:
You're right. This is a book you need to read through to the end to know exactly (sort of) what is going on. It is, in one sense, a who-dun-it.

Everyman wrote:
I strongly suggest not reading any reviews of this book which reveal the plot until after you have read the book once through. This point came to mind when I read the article on Chesterton in the latest New Yorker. It reveals totally the plot and "secrets" of the book. If you haven't read the book, and plan to for the discussion here, you might want to skip that article for the time being.

For many books knowing the plot in advance may not matter so much, and may even be helpful (War and Peace is perhaps one such), but my experience with TMWWT is that much of the power of the book is not knowing where it is going, but experiencing it along with Syme and not knowing more than he knows. The book isn't long, more novella than novel length, so it can be read in a few evenings.

JMHO.





_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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Laurel
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Re: On The Man who was Thursday

It will be an experience, that's fer sure.

Everyman wrote:
It's a very strange book -- I can't imagine how the discussion will go!

Laurel wrote:
You're right. This is a book you need to read through to the end to know exactly (sort of) what is going on. It is, in one sense, a who-dun-it.

Everyman wrote:
I strongly suggest not reading any reviews of this book which reveal the plot until after you have read the book once through. This point came to mind when I read the article on Chesterton in the latest New Yorker. It reveals totally the plot and "secrets" of the book. If you haven't read the book, and plan to for the discussion here, you might want to skip that article for the time being.

For many books knowing the plot in advance may not matter so much, and may even be helpful (War and Peace is perhaps one such), but my experience with TMWWT is that much of the power of the book is not knowing where it is going, but experiencing it along with Syme and not knowing more than he knows. The book isn't long, more novella than novel length, so it can be read in a few evenings.

JMHO.








"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Peppermill
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Re: EPIC JOURNEY--Where we've been; where we're going

Laurel -- do you have recommendations for an audio version of War and Peace?

Pepper
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Laurel
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Re: EPIC JOURNEY--Where we've been; where we're going

[ Edited ]
Frederick Davidson has read it to me four or five times over the years, and I have enjoyed it more each time. You can get his reading on MP3-CDs here or pre-order it on regular CDs here. I would dearly love to have the reading by Neville Jason. Audible has both the Davidson and the Jason available for immediate download.

Peppermill wrote:
Laurel -- do you have recommendations for an audio version of War and Peace?

Pepper



Message Edited by Laurel on 07-08-2008 07:55 AM
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Peppermill
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Re: EPIC JOURNEY--Where we've been; where we're going

Laurel -- thanks for the good information. I haven't made my choice yet. $7.49 on Audible sounds so tempting, but I can't imagine handling that amount of download successfully. Maybe if I had some prior experience ...

Laurel wrote:
Frederick Davidson has read it to me four or five times over the years, and I have enjoyed it more each time. You can get his reading on MP3-CDs here or pre-order it on regular CDs here. I would dearly love to have the reading by Neville Jason. Audible has both the Davidson and the Jason available for immediate download.

Peppermill wrote:
Laurel -- do you have recommendations for an audio version of War and Peace?

Pepper


"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Laurel
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Re: EPIC JOURNEY--Where we've been; where we're going

Surely you have the price wrong, Peppermill. Make sure it says "Unabridged." The Frederick Davidson is a huge bargain, though. Downloading is so easy that even I can do it, and the young men on the phone are very helpful and patient.

Peppermill wrote:
Laurel -- thanks for the good information. I haven't made my choice yet. $7.49 on Audible sounds so tempting, but I can't imagine handling that amount of download successfully. Maybe if I had some prior experience ...

Laurel wrote:
Frederick Davidson has read it to me four or five times over the years, and I have enjoyed it more each time. You can get his reading on MP3-CDs here or pre-order it on regular CDs here. I would dearly love to have the reading by Neville Jason. Audible has both the Davidson and the Jason available for immediate download.

Peppermill wrote:
Laurel -- do you have recommendations for an audio version of War and Peace?

Pepper





"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
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Re: EPIC JOURNEY--Where we've been; where we're going (War and Peace)

Let me see if I can be successful in sharing this rather fascinating map of Napoleon's advance on Moscow and subsequent retreat published by Charles Minard in 1869.

 

Pepper

 

PS -- note the temperature scale related to the retreat along the bottom.

 

PSS -- Source: Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. (on-line excerpts)

 

 

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Melissa_W
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Re: EPIC JOURNEY--Where we've been; where we're going (War and Peace)

Wow!  I'd seen modern map representations of the advance/retreat but not one that is more "of that era" - thanks! :smileyhappy:


Peppermill wrote:

Let me see if I can be successful in sharing this rather fascinating map of Napoleon's advance on Moscow and subsequent retreat published by Charles Minard in 1869.

 

Pepper

 

PS -- note the temperature scale related to the retreat along the bottom.

 

PSS -- Source: Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. (on-line excerpts)

 

 

 

 


 

Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
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Peppermill
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Re: War and Peace blog

Neat site! Neat commentary! Great Aussie humor! (But people who care about "spoilers" will have to use with care, at least until we get beyond where they are reading. I have watched one of the movies, so basically know the plot -- and I usually don't mind so-called "spoilers" anyway.) THX, Laurel!

 


Laurel wrote:
Someone in Australia is posting notes on each chapter of War and Peace, taking his readers through the book in one year. Here's an introduction that should be helpful to those who are getting a head start on reading the book: The Least You Need To Know.

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Everyman
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Re: War and Peace blog

There are other interesting posts on that blog, too, if you explore it.  Not relevant to this board, so I won't get into them.  But worth spending a few minutes looking around there.

 


Peppermill wrote:

Neat site! Neat commentary! Great Aussie humor! (But people who care about "spoilers" will have to use with care, at least until we get beyond where they are reading. I have watched one of the movies, so basically know the plot -- and I usually don't mind so-called "spoilers" anyway.) THX, Laurel!

 


Laurel wrote:
Someone in Australia is posting notes on each chapter of War and Peace, taking his readers through the book in one year. Here's an introduction that should be helpful to those who are getting a head start on reading the book: The Least You Need To Know.

 

 


 

 

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Laurel
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Re: War and Peace blog

I especially like his Mind Map of Characters.

 

If you can somehow freeze it at the point it is right now (print it, for example), it will be of great help for those of you who are getting started early.

 

In my opinion, there is no way that "spoilers" could spoil War and Peace. I've read it five times or more, seen three films of it countless times, and watched two productions of the opera over and over, and I'm still spoiling for another few reads. With Tolstoy, it's not so much where he's going but how he gets there and who he's going with and who and what and how and why you meet along the way. Something like that.


Everyman wrote:

There are other interesting posts on that blog, too, if you explore it.  Not relevant to this board, so I won't get into them.  But worth spending a few minutes looking around there.

 


Peppermill wrote:

Neat site! Neat commentary! Great Aussie humor! (But people who care about "spoilers" will have to use with care, at least until we get beyond where they are reading. I have watched one of the movies, so basically know the plot -- and I usually don't mind so-called "spoilers" anyway.) THX, Laurel!

 


Laurel wrote:
Someone in Australia is posting notes on each chapter of War and Peace, taking his readers through the book in one year. Here's an introduction that should be helpful to those who are getting a head start on reading the book: The Least You Need To Know.

 

 


 

 


 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Peppermill
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Re: War and Peace blog

Somehow this post from our Aussie "friends" seems to respond to what you are saying, Laurel?

 

Matt wrote: "It’s called an exercise in self-discipline, B..! The whole point of reading it slowly is to give you a chance to revel in the details, rather than rushing in to try to grasp a big picture.

 

"On a practical note, reading really fast can sometimes confuse people, because they get lost in all the characters.


"But, on a more philosophical note, Tolstoy’s whole premise of history (forgive me if this is a spoiler . . .) is that it is made up of the drive of lots of little decisions and interactions made by individuals. So, on the whole, the little details of individuals are much more important than the big picture as a whole, and so if you go slowly and pay attention to the small details of the book, you will be much more on Tolstoy’s wavelength. {Emphasis added.}

 

But, of course, there’s no way I’m going to be able to stop you peeking ahead . . . and I have read it before, so I do have the luxury of knowing what happens next. But still . . . aren’t you supposed to be really busy?"

 

 


Laurel wrote: ...In my opinion, there is no way that "spoilers" could spoil War and Peace. I've read it five times or more, seen three films of it countless times, and watched two productions of the opera over and over, and I'm still spoiling for another few reads. With Tolstoy, it's not so much where he's going but how he gets there and who he's going with and who and what and how and why you meet along the way. Something like that. {Italics added.}


Peppermill wrote:

Neat site! Neat commentary! Great Aussie humor! (But people who care about "spoilers" will have to use with care...


Laurel wrote:
Someone in Australia is posting notes on each chapter of War and Peace, taking his readers through the book in one year. Here's an introduction that should be helpful to those who are getting a head start on reading the book: The Least You Need To Know.



 

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Laurel
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Re: War and Peace blog

I just read a review by Adam Thirlwell that speaks to what you have put in bold. It ends this way:

 

...everything in this novel is small. Because War and Peace is a great novel not because Tolstoy's characters worry about God and death and nations, but because they make up weird words. Its subject is not grandiose: it is chance. And the only way to show this is minutely. Tolstoy is the greatest miniaturist in the history of the novel. He is economical. This outlandish, wonderful novel - which survives all of its impossible, necessary translations, including this thorough but imperfect one - is a masterpiece of reduction, and has style.

 


Peppermill wrote:

Somehow this post from our Aussie "friends" seems to respond to what you are saying, Laurel?

 

Matt wrote: "It’s called an exercise in self-discipline, B..! The whole point of reading it slowly is to give you a chance to revel in the details, rather than rushing in to try to grasp a big picture.

 

"On a practical note, reading really fast can sometimes confuse people, because they get lost in all the characters.


"But, on a more philosophical note, Tolstoy’s whole premise of history (forgive me if this is a spoiler . . .) is that it is made up of the drive of lots of little decisions and interactions made by individuals. So, on the whole, the little details of individuals are much more important than the big picture as a whole, and so if you go slowly and pay attention to the small details of the book, you will be much more on Tolstoy’s wavelength. {Emphasis added.}

 

But, of course, there’s no way I’m going to be able to stop you peeking ahead . . . and I have read it before, so I do have the luxury of knowing what happens next. But still . . . aren’t you supposed to be really busy?"

 

 


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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jss4
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Re: War and Peace blog

I am very excited to read War and Peace. I started reading a little about it from Anna Karenina, from the beginning about the authour part. I was very excited to challenge myself with something to stretch my mind more than my kid's books would. I am going to try and stay a little ahead of the reading so I know what is going on. This will be my first time reading it... I have been devouring lots of books these days.

Janelle

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Laurel
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Re: War and Peace blog

Great goal, Janelle. Welcome aboard!

 


jss4 wrote:

I am very excited to read War and Peace. I started reading a little about it from Anna Karenina, from the beginning about the authour part. I was very excited to challenge myself with something to stretch my mind more than my kid's books would. I am going to try and stay a little ahead of the reading so I know what is going on. This will be my first time reading it... I have been devouring lots of books these days.

Janelle


 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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PaulK
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Re: EPIC JOURNEY--Where we've been; where we're going

I have been in and out of this group. I start with good intentions but usually fall hopelessly behind. For example I finished Anna Karenina a few days ago. However I did finish a few of the books including Eugene Onegin and Paradise Lost. I would never have undertaken Pardise Lost without this group and it was an very enriching endevour. I will run out and buy W&P but I fear my Olympic viewing may get me off to a slow start.
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Laurel
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Re: EPIC JOURNEY--Where we've been; where we're going

You've accomplished a lot, Paul. I always enjoy your comments.

PaulK wrote:
I have been in and out of this group. I start with good intentions but usually fall hopelessly behind. For example I finished Anna Karenina a few days ago. However I did finish a few of the books including Eugene Onegin and Paradise Lost. I would never have undertaken Pardise Lost without this group and it was an very enriching endevour. I will run out and buy W&P but I fear my Olympic viewing may get me off to a slow start.

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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WildCityWoman
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Re: EPIC JOURNEY--Where we've been; where we're going (War and Peace)

Heh! Heh! When I first glanced at your message, I thought it said modern 'rap' versions . . . can you imagine?

 

de man make da boom boom

boom boom boom

 

den we make da boom boom

boom boom boom

 

chugga boom

boom boom

chugga boom boom

 

makin' with the boom boom

boom boom boom

 

(Hope nobody's offended with my little silly here)

 


pedsphleb wrote:

Wow!  I'd seen modern map representations of the advance/retreat but not one that is more "of that era" - thanks! :smileyhappy:


Peppermill wrote:

Let me see if I can be successful in sharing this rather fascinating map of Napoleon's advance on Moscow and subsequent retreat published by Charles Minard in 1869.

 

Pepper

 

PS -- note the temperature scale related to the retreat along the bottom.

 

PSS -- Source: Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. (on-line excerpts)

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

 

Carly

http://wildcity.proboards14.com/index.cgi?board=Books