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Laurel
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ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

I always look forward to the little family story in Book 6. What do you all think of Hector?

Here are some reading questions:

Book six begins with the deaths of minor figures on the Trojan side, many of whom Homer brings briefly to life with a few words before they are killed. What is the intended effect of Homer's description of Axylos (12-15)? Evaluate the words and actions of Agamemnon in the case of Adrestos in the light of Homeric morality (44-60).

What order does Helenos give to Hektor (86-95)? What is unusual about this order? Why does Diomedes (the son of Tydeus) ask Glaukos to identify himself (123-143)? What comment does Glaukos's simile in 146-150 make on humanity? The story which Glaukos tells about his grandfather Bellerophontes has little or no connection with the plot, but has an interest of its own as a heroic tale. The typically loose organization of the epic form easily accommodates such a digression, which would be intolerable in a smaller and more tightly structured form like drama. What discovery does Diomedes make when Glaukos mentions his grandfather (215-231)? What is the result of Diomedes's discovery (232-236)?

After he delivers Helenos's message to his mother Hekabe, what does Hektor tell her he intends to do (280)? What is Hektor's attitude toward Paris (281-285)? What is Athene's reaction to the prayers and gift of the Trojan women (311)? What literary device is Homer employing here? Explain your answer.

What does Hektor encourage Paris to do (326-331)? How does Paris react to Hektor's words (333-341)? What is Helen's view of herself and Paris (343-353)? Where does Hektor go next (365)? What does Andromache fear (405-410)? Note carefully Andromache's story about the death of her father at the hands of Achilleus (414-428). It is a foreshadowing of Achilleus's behavior in the last book of the Iliad. What does Andromache think is most notable about Achilleus's conduct with regard to her father? What request does Andromache make of Hektor (431-434)? In Hektor's mind what prevents him from doing what his wife asks (440-446)? What does Hektor foresee for the Trojans and his wife (447-465)? What is the intended effect of the laughter of Hektor and Andromache at their son's terror in the context this sorrow-filled situation (466-471)? What hopes does Hektor have for his son (476-481)? What literary device is evident in this expression of Hektor's hopes? What is Hektor's state of mind as he leaves his family (486-493)? What literary device is evident in 500? What do we learn about Hektor's character from his meetings with Hekabe, Paris, Helen and Andromache?

What comment does the simile in 506-511 make on the character of Paris? What are Hektor's feelings about Paris (521-525)?

What purpose does book 6 serve? Does it advance the story begun in book 1 at all? Explain your answer.

http://ablemedia.com/ctcweb/netshots/homer.htm

Self Quiz http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/classics/hansen/homr6qz.htm
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Everyman
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache



Laurel wrote:
I always look forward to the little family story in Book 6. What do you all think of Hector?

Hector is an enormously sympathetic character presented through this most touching scene. Of all the characters in the Iliad he is the one I would most like my own son to emulate. He personifies the reasons the Trojans are fighting; it is in defense of their homes, their wives, their children. He is courageous and a fierce fighter without having sacrificed his capability for love and tenderness. He knows that his brother has done a wrong thing in bringing all this trouble on them, but he is willing to take on his brother's battle anyhow.

What is perhaps even more interesting than the character of Hector himself, though, is that it is a Greek poet, not a Trojan poet, who paints this enormously compelling picture. It is very seldom, I find,in books about war written from the point of view of the victors that the enemy is presented in such a humane, sympathetic way. Think of the songs, movies, stories, etc. which the British and Americans have produced about the Japanese and Germans during World War II. Can you think of a single work of literature, film, or art which presented a German or Japanese soldier in anything like the light that Homer presents Hector in?

This respect for an enemy whom one is nonetheless committed to killing and defeating (and enslaving his wife and children) is virtually unparalleled in literature, and is IMO a mark of Homer's extraordinary artistic integrity, capability, and humanity.
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Laurel
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

I agree. I think it is a very beautiful portrayal. The only people I can think of whom those on the other side portray sympathetically are the great generals Robert E Lee and Stonewall Jackson.

Everyman wrote:


Laurel wrote:
I always look forward to the little family story in Book 6. What do you all think of Hector?

Hector is an enormously sympathetic character presented through this most touching scene. Of all the characters in the Iliad he is the one I would most like my own son to emulate. He personifies the reasons the Trojans are fighting; it is in defense of their homes, their wives, their children. He is courageous and a fierce fighter without having sacrificed his capability for love and tenderness. He knows that his brother has done a wrong thing in bringing all this trouble on them, but he is willing to take on his brother's battle anyhow.

What is perhaps even more interesting than the character of Hector himself, though, is that it is a Greek poet, not a Trojan poet, who paints this enormously compelling picture. It is very seldom, I find,in books about war written from the point of view of the victors that the enemy is presented in such a humane, sympathetic way. Think of the songs, movies, stories, etc. which the British and Americans have produced about the Japanese and Germans during World War II. Can you think of a single work of literature, film, or art which presented a German or Japanese soldier in anything like the light that Homer presents Hector in?

This respect for an enemy whom one is nonetheless committed to killing and defeating (and enslaving his wife and children) is virtually unparalleled in literature, and is IMO a mark of Homer's extraordinary artistic integrity, capability, and humanity.


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Laurel
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Hector and Andromache

The scene between Hector and Andromache always bring's Richard Lovelace's poem to my mind:

To Lucasta, going to the Wars

TELL me not, Sweet, I am unkind,
That from the nunnery
Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind
To war and arms I fly.

True, a new mistress now I chase,
The first foe in the field;
And with a stronger faith embrace
A sword, a horse, a shield.

Yet this inconstancy is such
As thou too shalt adore;
I could not love thee, Dear, so much,
Loved I not Honour more.

--Richard Lovelace. 1618–1658

Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. 1919. The Oxford Book of English Verse: 1250–1900.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Re: Hector and Andromache

[ Edited ]
Hector, as the eldest son of King Priam, had to urge the Trojans to fight (Johnston translation):

Brandishing two sharp spears,
he moved through all the army, urging men to fight, 130
rousing their spirits for the harsh brutality of war

But he did not approve of the war between the Greeks and Trojans and curses his brother Paris for having brought the war upon them by abducting Helen:

I'll find Paris
and call him back, if he will to listen to me. [280]
If only the earth would open under him,
swallow him up! Olympian Zeus raised him
as trouble for the Trojans, for brave Priam,
for his children. If I could see Paris die,
heading down to Hades, then I could say 360
my heart's sorrows were done with and forgotten.

And later:-

Paris, you're a worthless man.
It's quite wrong of you to nurse that anger
in your heart, while men are being destroyed,
fighting round the city, its steep walls.
It's because of you the sounds of warfare
catch fire round our city. You would fight
any man you saw avoiding battle, [330]
fleeing war's brutality. So up with you,
or soon our city will go up in smoke, 410
with fire destroying everything.

[My italics - Homer again referring to the brutality of war.]

I see Hector as a First World War hero who did not want to go to war but was caught up in the patriotic fever of his times and feared being given a white feather. After Helen asks him, in a moving speech, not to go to war he says:-

Wife, [440]
all this concerns me, too. But I'd be disgraced, 540
dreadfully shamed among Trojan men
and Trojan women in their trailing gowns,
if I should, like a coward, slink away from war.

Book 6 also captures the reluctance of the women to fight:

Meanwhile, Hector reached the Scaean Gates and oak tree.
The Trojans' wives and daughters ran up round him,
asking after children, brothers, relatives, and husbands.
Addressing each of them in turn, he ordered them [240]
to pray to all the gods. For many were to face great grief.

Helen too was regretful

But come in, sit on this chair, my brother,
since this trouble really weighs upon your mind— 440
all because I was a bitch—because of that
and Paris' folly, Zeus gives us an evil fate,
so we may be subjects for men's songs
in generations yet to come."

And Hector's wife, Andromache, especially feared war because she had already lost her entire family, mother, father and seven brothers to an earlier conflict:-

'My dear husband, your warlike spirit
will be your death. You've no compassion
for your infant child, for me, your sad wife, 500
who before long will be your widow.
For soon the Achaeans will attack you,
all together, and cut you down. As for me, [410]
it would be better, if I'm to lose you,
to be buried in the ground. For then I'll have
no other comfort, once you meet your death,
except my sorrow. I have no father,
no dear mother. For lord Achilles killed
my father, when he wiped out Thebe......
As for my mother,
who ruled wooded Thebe-under-Placus,
he brought her here with all his other spoils.
Then he released her for a massive ransom.
But archer goddess Artemis then killed her
in her father's house.'

Hector's quick acceptance of Paris' offer to fight Menelaus alone is another instance of his reluctance to fight the war but alas! this strategy does not work and he is, as the king's eldest son, drawn reluctantly but bravely into the conflict. His sense of responsibility and bravery contrasts with Paris' irresponsibility and cowardice.

Hector also has more respect for the gods than Achilles and is 'ashamed to offer up to Zeus/libations of gleaming wine with unwashed hands/It's not at all appropriate for a man spattered with blood and dirt to offer prayers...' and says 'I tell you this—no one escapes his fate, not the coward/nor the brave man, from the moment of his birth.' In this he has far less hubris than Achilles, which will perhaps ensure his immortality.

Hector perhaps comes nearer to what we think of as a modern hero - reluctant to engage in heroics and war but doing what he sees as his duty. As he is a Trojan and portrayed more sympathetically than, say, Achilles, the major Greek hero, perhaps Homer, a Greek himself, is again portraying the futility of war in Book 6.

Message Edited by Choisya on 09-20-2007 05:14 AM
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Choisya
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Re: The Tamarisk tree

[ Edited ]
There is a reference to the Tamarisk tree (Tamarisk Sinaitic or Gallica) and Menalaus at the beginning of Book 6 (41-46 Johnston), which may mean that he has been favoured by the gods:-

Menelaus, skilled in war cries, took Adrestus still alive.
His horses had panicked and bolted off across the plain.
They charged into a tamarisk bush and snapped the pole
on the curved chariot, right at the very end. [40]

In ancient Eyptian legend the fragrant tamarisk tree draws upon the power of the god Osirus' body (who was found dead at its foot) and is connected with magical power and immortality. The story has connotations with the one of Moses being found among the bullrushes and to the one Shakespeare used in The Tempest of finding Ariel locked in a tree.

http://www.legends.egyptholiday.com/isis_finds_osirus.htm

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pauls_fotos/484435055/

Isis was the wife of Osirus and Isis is also known as Hera who, in The Iliad, is the wife of Zeus. She is often referred to as 'moon brained' and this may explain Hera's somewhat irrational behaviour with Zeus.

There are a number of references to the Tamarisk tree in The Iliad - in Books 1 and 10 spoils are hid in the reeds by a tamarisk tree and in Book 21 Achilles leans upon a tamarisk bush before plunging into the river 'like a god'.

Ancient burial places were often adorned with Tamarisk trees and it is also a tree which has sometimes been identified with the 'burning bush' seen by Moses, as at certain temperatures it will combust. Manna was also produced from the soft twigs of the Tamarisk which exudes a honey-like substance when infested with a certain insect.

http://dict.die.net/tamarisk%20manna/

(From Choisya the Gardener:smileyvery-happy:.)

Message Edited by Choisya on 09-20-2007 05:46 AM
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

In that connection, I'd like to recommend some things:
1) A musical composition for narrator and orchestra by Arthur Bliss called "Morning Heroes." Bliss wrote the piece in honor of his brother who died in WWI. The first movement is "Hector's Farewell to Andromache." He used what would have been the common translation of his day, the prose translation of Leaf, Lang and Myers -- an archaic translation, but still quite powerful if formal. The music behind the narrator who tells the whole scene beautifully underscores the sadness of the moment.
2) A look at the painting by Giorgio di Chirico, "Hector and Andromache." Di Chirico, one of the Italian Futurists painted this during WWI, and he does some interesting things -- one he paints the couple as mannequins (which is a di Chirico thing anyways), and he sets them on a stage, which suggests the artificiality of the scene (Helen in Book III suggests to Hector that all their sufferings are just meat for later storytellers -- di Chirico's staging suggests something similar). There is a sense in di Chirico's piece, with the faceless mannequins that this farewell, though specific to Hector and Andromache, is also generic. Thousands of Italian women and girls said goodbye to their loved ones in train stations throughout Italy, as the men headed north to fight the Austrians and the Germans. Those boys told their loved ones the same thing that Hector tells Andromache -- don't worry overly much -- my time will come when it will come, and this is something I must do.
3) Another musical piece by Samuel Barber, "Andromache's Farewell," -- this is not the scene from "Iliad VI," but a scene from the "Trojan Women" of Euripides where Andromache has to bid farewell to her son, Astyanax, after the war.
4) Some books by a British author, Christopher Logue. Logue was asked to do some rendition of the story of the "Iliad" for BBC radio, and these attempts at updating and recasting the stories turned into 4 books: "The Kings," "The Husbands," "War Music" and "All Day Permanent Red." Though there is danger in taking Homer on, I think Logue does a great job with these works.





Laurel wrote:
I always look forward to the little family story in Book 6. What do you all think of Hector?

Here are some reading questions:

Book six begins with the deaths of minor figures on the Trojan side, many of whom Homer brings briefly to life with a few words before they are killed. What is the intended effect of Homer's description of Axylos (12-15)? Evaluate the words and actions of Agamemnon in the case of Adrestos in the light of Homeric morality (44-60).

What order does Helenos give to Hektor (86-95)? What is unusual about this order? Why does Diomedes (the son of Tydeus) ask Glaukos to identify himself (123-143)? What comment does Glaukos's simile in 146-150 make on humanity? The story which Glaukos tells about his grandfather Bellerophontes has little or no connection with the plot, but has an interest of its own as a heroic tale. The typically loose organization of the epic form easily accommodates such a digression, which would be intolerable in a smaller and more tightly structured form like drama. What discovery does Diomedes make when Glaukos mentions his grandfather (215-231)? What is the result of Diomedes's discovery (232-236)?

After he delivers Helenos's message to his mother Hekabe, what does Hektor tell her he intends to do (280)? What is Hektor's attitude toward Paris (281-285)? What is Athene's reaction to the prayers and gift of the Trojan women (311)? What literary device is Homer employing here? Explain your answer.

What does Hektor encourage Paris to do (326-331)? How does Paris react to Hektor's words (333-341)? What is Helen's view of herself and Paris (343-353)? Where does Hektor go next (365)? What does Andromache fear (405-410)? Note carefully Andromache's story about the death of her father at the hands of Achilleus (414-428). It is a foreshadowing of Achilleus's behavior in the last book of the Iliad. What does Andromache think is most notable about Achilleus's conduct with regard to her father? What request does Andromache make of Hektor (431-434)? In Hektor's mind what prevents him from doing what his wife asks (440-446)? What does Hektor foresee for the Trojans and his wife (447-465)? What is the intended effect of the laughter of Hektor and Andromache at their son's terror in the context this sorrow-filled situation (466-471)? What hopes does Hektor have for his son (476-481)? What literary device is evident in this expression of Hektor's hopes? What is Hektor's state of mind as he leaves his family (486-493)? What literary device is evident in 500? What do we learn about Hektor's character from his meetings with Hekabe, Paris, Helen and Andromache?

What comment does the simile in 506-511 make on the character of Paris? What are Hektor's feelings about Paris (521-525)?

What purpose does book 6 serve? Does it advance the story begun in book 1 at all? Explain your answer.

http://ablemedia.com/ctcweb/netshots/homer.htm

Self Quiz http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/classics/hansen/homr6qz.htm


I always maintain, when I teach the "Iliad," that if only the scene between Hector and Andromache from Book VI, the embassy to Achilles in Book IX and the scene between Achilles and Priam in Book XXIV survived, Homer would still be considered one of the greatest of all authors.
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

Oh, I should have given the link to the di Chirico piece. It is:
http://www.luminadyer.com/hector.htm
Dignity, always dignity.
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

Bernard, your contributions are so helpful! Here's an article about "Morning Heroes."

http://inkpot.com/classical/blissmorningheroes.html

I was unable to find the album, but there is a short selection from it on the album "Artists Rifles 1914-1918: Poetry, Prose & Music Of The First World War."

It's number 12 here:

http://www.emusic.com/album/Artists-Rifles-1914-1918-Poetry-Prose-Music-Of-Various-MP3-Download/1106...

(Sorry, tinyurl doesn't work for this.)





bdNM wrote:
In that connection, I'd like to recommend some things:
1) A musical composition for narrator and orchestra by Arthur Bliss called "Morning Heroes." Bliss wrote the piece in honor of his brother who died in WWI. The first movement is "Hector's Farewell to Andromache." He used what would have been the common translation of his day, the prose translation of Leaf, Lang and Myers -- an archaic translation, but still quite powerful if formal. The music behind the narrator who tells the whole scene beautifully underscores the sadness of the moment.



"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Laurel
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

Fascinating!

http://www.luminadyer.com/hector.htm



bdNM wrote:
2) A look at the painting by Giorgio di Chirico, "Hector and Andromache." Di Chirico, one of the Italian Futurists painted this during WWI, and he does some interesting things -- one he paints the couple as mannequins (which is a di Chirico thing anyways), and he sets them on a stage, which suggests the artificiality of the scene (Helen in Book III suggests to Hector that all their sufferings are just meat for later storytellers -- di Chirico's staging suggests something similar). There is a sense in di Chirico's piece, with the faceless mannequins that this farewell, though specific to Hector and Andromache, is also generic. Thousands of Italian women and girls said goodbye to their loved ones in train stations throughout Italy, as the men headed north to fight the Austrians and the Germans. Those boys told their loved ones the same thing that Hector tells Andromache -- don't worry overly much -- my time will come when it will come, and this is something I must do.


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Laurel
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

That really has a rousing introduction! It's on this album, along with "Dover Beach." I don't know whether the whole thing is here:

http://music.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?z=y&EAN=074644672725&itm=2



bdNM wrote:
3) Another musical piece by Samuel Barber, "Andromache's Farewell," -- this is not the scene from "Iliad VI," but a scene from the "Trojan Women" of Euripides where Andromache has to bid farewell to her son, Astyanax, after the war.


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Laurel
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

There's some beautiful poetry there. Here's one of Logue's books:

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&EAN=9780226491905&itm=4



bdNM wrote:
4) Some books by a British author, Christopher Logue. Logue was asked to do some rendition of the story of the "Iliad" for BBC radio, and these attempts at updating and recasting the stories turned into 4 books: "The Kings," "The Husbands," "War Music" and "All Day Permanent Red." Though there is danger in taking Homer on, I think Logue does a great job with these works.


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Laurel
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

Exactly the scenes I would choose!

bdNM wrote:
I always maintain, when I teach the "Iliad," that if only the scene between Hector and Andromache from Book VI, the embassy to Achilles in Book IX and the scene between Achilles and Priam in Book XXIV survived, Homer would still be considered one of the greatest of all authors.


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

Thanks a lot for these recommendations BdNM.




bdNM wrote:
In that connection, I'd like to recommend some things:
1) A musical composition for narrator and orchestra by Arthur Bliss called "Morning Heroes." Bliss wrote the piece in honor of his brother who died in WWI. The first movement is "Hector's Farewell to Andromache." He used what would have been the common translation of his day, the prose translation of Leaf, Lang and Myers -- an archaic translation, but still quite powerful if formal. The music behind the narrator who tells the whole scene beautifully underscores the sadness of the moment.
2) A look at the painting by Giorgio di Chirico, "Hector and Andromache." Di Chirico, one of the Italian Futurists painted this during WWI, and he does some interesting things -- one he paints the couple as mannequins (which is a di Chirico thing anyways), and he sets them on a stage, which suggests the artificiality of the scene (Helen in Book III suggests to Hector that all their sufferings are just meat for later storytellers -- di Chirico's staging suggests something similar). There is a sense in di Chirico's piece, with the faceless mannequins that this farewell, though specific to Hector and Andromache, is also generic. Thousands of Italian women and girls said goodbye to their loved ones in train stations throughout Italy, as the men headed north to fight the Austrians and the Germans. Those boys told their loved ones the same thing that Hector tells Andromache -- don't worry overly much -- my time will come when it will come, and this is something I must do.
3) Another musical piece by Samuel Barber, "Andromache's Farewell," -- this is not the scene from "Iliad VI," but a scene from the "Trojan Women" of Euripides where Andromache has to bid farewell to her son, Astyanax, after the war.
4) Some books by a British author, Christopher Logue. Logue was asked to do some rendition of the story of the "Iliad" for BBC radio, and these attempts at updating and recasting the stories turned into 4 books: "The Kings," "The Husbands," "War Music" and "All Day Permanent Red." Though there is danger in taking Homer on, I think Logue does a great job with these works.





Laurel wrote:
I always look forward to the little family story in Book 6. What do you all think of Hector?

Here are some reading questions:

Book six begins with the deaths of minor figures on the Trojan side, many of whom Homer brings briefly to life with a few words before they are killed. What is the intended effect of Homer's description of Axylos (12-15)? Evaluate the words and actions of Agamemnon in the case of Adrestos in the light of Homeric morality (44-60).

What order does Helenos give to Hektor (86-95)? What is unusual about this order? Why does Diomedes (the son of Tydeus) ask Glaukos to identify himself (123-143)? What comment does Glaukos's simile in 146-150 make on humanity? The story which Glaukos tells about his grandfather Bellerophontes has little or no connection with the plot, but has an interest of its own as a heroic tale. The typically loose organization of the epic form easily accommodates such a digression, which would be intolerable in a smaller and more tightly structured form like drama. What discovery does Diomedes make when Glaukos mentions his grandfather (215-231)? What is the result of Diomedes's discovery (232-236)?

After he delivers Helenos's message to his mother Hekabe, what does Hektor tell her he intends to do (280)? What is Hektor's attitude toward Paris (281-285)? What is Athene's reaction to the prayers and gift of the Trojan women (311)? What literary device is Homer employing here? Explain your answer.

What does Hektor encourage Paris to do (326-331)? How does Paris react to Hektor's words (333-341)? What is Helen's view of herself and Paris (343-353)? Where does Hektor go next (365)? What does Andromache fear (405-410)? Note carefully Andromache's story about the death of her father at the hands of Achilleus (414-428). It is a foreshadowing of Achilleus's behavior in the last book of the Iliad. What does Andromache think is most notable about Achilleus's conduct with regard to her father? What request does Andromache make of Hektor (431-434)? In Hektor's mind what prevents him from doing what his wife asks (440-446)? What does Hektor foresee for the Trojans and his wife (447-465)? What is the intended effect of the laughter of Hektor and Andromache at their son's terror in the context this sorrow-filled situation (466-471)? What hopes does Hektor have for his son (476-481)? What literary device is evident in this expression of Hektor's hopes? What is Hektor's state of mind as he leaves his family (486-493)? What literary device is evident in 500? What do we learn about Hektor's character from his meetings with Hekabe, Paris, Helen and Andromache?

What comment does the simile in 506-511 make on the character of Paris? What are Hektor's feelings about Paris (521-525)?

What purpose does book 6 serve? Does it advance the story begun in book 1 at all? Explain your answer.

http://ablemedia.com/ctcweb/netshots/homer.htm

Self Quiz http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/classics/hansen/homr6qz.htm


I always maintain, when I teach the "Iliad," that if only the scene between Hector and Andromache from Book VI, the embassy to Achilles in Book IX and the scene between Achilles and Priam in Book XXIV survived, Homer would still be considered one of the greatest of all authors.


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Choisya
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

[ Edited ]
Great links as ever Laurel. Many thanks.




Laurel wrote:
Bernard, your contributions are so helpful! Here's an article about "Morning Heroes."

http://inkpot.com/classical/blissmorningheroes.html

I was unable to find the album, but there is a short selection from it on the album "Artists Rifles 1914-1918: Poetry, Prose & Music Of The First World War."

It's number 12 here:

http://www.emusic.com/album/Artists-Rifles-1914-1918-Poetry-Prose-Music-Of-Various-MP3-Download/1106...

(Sorry, tinyurl doesn't work for this.)





bdNM wrote:
In that connection, I'd like to recommend some things:
1) A musical composition for narrator and orchestra by Arthur Bliss called "Morning Heroes." Bliss wrote the piece in honor of his brother who died in WWI. The first movement is "Hector's Farewell to Andromache." He used what would have been the common translation of his day, the prose translation of Leaf, Lang and Myers -- an archaic translation, but still quite powerful if formal. The music behind the narrator who tells the whole scene beautifully underscores the sadness of the moment.







Message Edited by Choisya on 09-20-2007 04:14 PM
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Choisya
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

And here is a review of Logue's work on The Iliad:-

http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/fiction/article580000.ece




Laurel wrote:
There's some beautiful poetry there. Here's one of Logue's books:

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&EAN=9780226491905&itm=4



bdNM wrote:
4) Some books by a British author, Christopher Logue. Logue was asked to do some rendition of the story of the "Iliad" for BBC radio, and these attempts at updating and recasting the stories turned into 4 books: "The Kings," "The Husbands," "War Music" and "All Day Permanent Red." Though there is danger in taking Homer on, I think Logue does a great job with these works.





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Choisya
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

What tremendous Togetherness!




Laurel wrote:
Fascinating!

http://www.luminadyer.com/hector.htm



bdNM wrote:
2) A look at the painting by Giorgio di Chirico, "Hector and Andromache." Di Chirico, one of the Italian Futurists painted this during WWI, and he does some interesting things -- one he paints the couple as mannequins (which is a di Chirico thing anyways), and he sets them on a stage, which suggests the artificiality of the scene (Helen in Book III suggests to Hector that all their sufferings are just meat for later storytellers -- di Chirico's staging suggests something similar). There is a sense in di Chirico's piece, with the faceless mannequins that this farewell, though specific to Hector and Andromache, is also generic. Thousands of Italian women and girls said goodbye to their loved ones in train stations throughout Italy, as the men headed north to fight the Austrians and the Germans. Those boys told their loved ones the same thing that Hector tells Andromache -- don't worry overly much -- my time will come when it will come, and this is something I must do.





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Laurel
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

interesting! Thanks!

Choisya wrote:
And here is a review of Logue's work on The Iliad:-

http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/fiction/article580000.ece




Laurel wrote:
There's some beautiful poetry there. Here's one of Logue's books:

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&EAN=9780226491905&itm=4



bdNM wrote:
4) Some books by a British author, Christopher Logue. Logue was asked to do some rendition of the story of the "Iliad" for BBC radio, and these attempts at updating and recasting the stories turned into 4 books: "The Kings," "The Husbands," "War Music" and "All Day Permanent Red." Though there is danger in taking Homer on, I think Logue does a great job with these works.








"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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bdNM
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

The album can be found on iTunes. I have a disk, but the recordings are currently out of print, I believe.


Laurel wrote:
Bernard, your contributions are so helpful! Here's an article about "Morning Heroes."

http://inkpot.com/classical/blissmorningheroes.html

I was unable to find the album, but there is a short selection from it on the album "Artists Rifles 1914-1918: Poetry, Prose & Music Of The First World War."

It's number 12 here:

http://www.emusic.com/album/Artists-Rifles-1914-1918-Poetry-Prose-Music-Of-Various-MP3-Download/1106...

(Sorry, tinyurl doesn't work for this.)





bdNM wrote:
In that connection, I'd like to recommend some things:
1) A musical composition for narrator and orchestra by Arthur Bliss called "Morning Heroes." Bliss wrote the piece in honor of his brother who died in WWI. The first movement is "Hector's Farewell to Andromache." He used what would have been the common translation of his day, the prose translation of Leaf, Lang and Myers -- an archaic translation, but still quite powerful if formal. The music behind the narrator who tells the whole scene beautifully underscores the sadness of the moment.






Dignity, always dignity.
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leelee2525
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Re: ILIAD Book 6: Hector and Andromache

They are all beautiful. Thank you for the links, Laurel and your recommendations, Bernard.

Loretta




Laurel wrote:
Bernard, your contributions are so helpful! Here's an article about "Morning Heroes."

http://inkpot.com/classical/blissmorningheroes.html

I was unable to find the album, but there is a short selection from it on the album "Artists Rifles 1914-1918: Poetry, Prose & Music Of The First World War."

It's number 12 here:

http://www.emusic.com/album/Artists-Rifles-1914-1918-Poetry-Prose-Music-Of-Various-MP3-Download/1106...

(Sorry, tinyurl doesn't work for this.)





bdNM wrote:
In that connection, I'd like to recommend some things:
1) A musical composition for narrator and orchestra by Arthur Bliss called "Morning Heroes." Bliss wrote the piece in honor of his brother who died in WWI. The first movement is "Hector's Farewell to Andromache." He used what would have been the common translation of his day, the prose translation of Leaf, Lang and Myers -- an archaic translation, but still quite powerful if formal. The music behind the narrator who tells the whole scene beautifully underscores the sadness of the moment.