Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Reader-Moderator
bdNM
Posts: 470
Registered: ‎11-22-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

I'll do what I can long distance.
Dignity, always dignity.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Well, I'm finally back among you on reading The Aeneid.  I am in the middle of the second book, having listened to the corresponding Teaching Company lectures. 

 

My copy is Fitzgerald's translation, in an Everyman hard cover edition.  I was in the local B&N close to closing, with a discount coupon, a few weeks ago, and could not find it -- I was looking for a paperback.  Well, when a bookseller found this copy, I was both too embarrassed and too harassed to return it to the shelf.  Now, I am faced with the dilemma of reading from a copy which I hesitate to underline, let alone deface with marginalia! Even though the price was little more than a paperback edition might have been.

 

I am of a technical background and have been enjoying the world of epic literature which Laurel leads us through here.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Frequent Contributor
Timbuktu2
Posts: 528
Registered: ‎11-15-2008
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Welcome Peppermill.  I relate to your story of how you bought the book.  Go ahead and underline, it's yours and marginalia are your part of the "conversation".
Correspondent
rbehr
Posts: 354
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

If I don't mark it, I might as well not read it.  Take the plunge and go ahead and underline and make notes in the book!!  You won't regret it. 

 

I have a Great Books of the Western World set and was also hesitant to mark the hardback books, but, once I started, it was well worth it for the retention and assimilation of the text.


Peppermill wrote:

Well, I'm finally back among you on reading The Aeneid.  I am in the middle of the second book, having listened to the corresponding Teaching Company lectures. 

 

My copy is Fitzgerald's translation, in an Everyman hard cover edition.  I was in the local B&N close to closing, with a discount coupon, a few weeks ago, and could not find it -- I was looking for a paperback.  Well, when a bookseller found this copy, I was both too embarrassed and too harassed to return it to the shelf.  Now, I am faced with the dilemma of reading from a copy which I hesitate to underline, let alone deface with marginalia! Even though the price was little more than a paperback edition might have been.

 

I am of a technical background and have been enjoying the world of epic literature which Laurel leads us through here.


 

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Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hi, P, and welcome. Just remember, you got a bargain. Also, the book will be much more valuable to you with your marks and annotations than without. If I have a pen within reach, the book in my hand will be marked. It's just automatic. Sometimes I find myself proofreading or even copy-editing. And then there are those out-and-out arguments with an author.  And if you become famous, they will be a great source of income after you're gone.

Peppermill wrote:

Well, I'm finally back among you on reading The Aeneid.  I am in the middle of the second book, having listened to the corresponding Teaching Company lectures. 

 

My copy is Fitzgerald's translation, in an Everyman hard cover edition.  I was in the local B&N close to closing, with a discount coupon, a few weeks ago, and could not find it -- I was looking for a paperback.  Well, when a bookseller found this copy, I was both too embarrassed and too harassed to return it to the shelf.  Now, I am faced with the dilemma of reading from a copy which I hesitate to underline, let alone deface with marginalia! Even though the price was little more than a paperback edition might have been.

 

I am of a technical background and have been enjoying the world of epic literature which Laurel leads us through here.


 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Frequent Contributor
Timbuktu2
Posts: 528
Registered: ‎11-15-2008
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Thomas Jefferson had a great many "mint condition" books in his library.  In fact, the pages hadn't been cut as they'd never been read.  John Adams, oth, had books that were very beat up, marked up, stained, a mess.  I've taken Adams as my role model!
Inspired Contributor
mapleann
Posts: 44
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

I am Maple from the far north, a small community in rural Alaska. I find myself seeking your discussion group quite by chance, but I am quite sure that I will stay. I am a lover of literature, though found myself for many years without reading much of anything, but now I am single again, and I have decided that my free time is MY time. And such, I find myself reading practically every day. I recently found myself craving classics and purchased The Aeneid, The Iliad, The Odyssey, Beowulf, The Metamorphoses, and Essential Dialogues of Plato from B&N's classic series collection. Oddly enough, I started to crave mythology by my daughter's obsession in the Twilight Saga. I opened my mouth to introduce her to Greek/Roman mythology, but found my neural library had been closed due its financier investing in pop culture. So, I am a bit bewildered as I reconstruct the knowledge that should have already been with me. Please have patience. I love to contribute, but please feel free to assist me in redesigning my concept web when it is comes to epics board.
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Laurel
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Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Welcome, Maple! You've certainly come to the right place. Don't hesitate to ask any question that pops into your mind, because we're all learners here.

mapleann wrote:
I am Maple from the far north, a small community in rural Alaska. I find myself seeking your discussion group quite by chance, but I am quite sure that I will stay. I am a lover of literature, though found myself for many years without reading much of anything, but now I am single again, and I have decided that my free time is MY time. And such, I find myself reading practically every day. I recently found myself craving classics and purchased The Aeneid, The Iliad, The Odyssey, Beowulf, The Metamorphoses, and Essential Dialogues of Plato from B&N's classic series collection. Oddly enough, I started to crave mythology by my daughter's obsession in the Twilight Saga. I opened my mouth to introduce her to Greek/Roman mythology, but found my neural library had been closed due its financier investing in pop culture. So, I am a bit bewildered as I reconstruct the knowledge that should have already been with me. Please have patience. I love to contribute, but please feel free to assist me in redesigning my concept web when it is comes to epics board.

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Frequent Contributor
KristyR
Posts: 379
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hi everyone!  I'm Kristy, a stay at home mother of 5 (ages 12 - 1) from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.  I tend to mostly lurk, but I really enjoy learning from everyone.  I enjoyed The Odyssey very much and was excited to start the Aeneid.  I tend to buy all the books being covered, but between the kids and our current home renovation, I don't always get as far as I'd like.  

 

By the way, thanks to all of you who posted titles of books about home libraries (ages ago).  I got some great ideas after perusing some of them and our library will hopefully be finished within the next few months!

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Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hi, Kristy. I'm glad you're still with us!

KristyR wrote:

Hi everyone!  I'm Kristy, a stay at home mother of 5 (ages 12 - 1) from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.  I tend to mostly lurk, but I really enjoy learning from everyone.  I enjoyed The Odyssey very much and was excited to start the Aeneid.  I tend to buy all the books being covered, but between the kids and our current home renovation, I don't always get as far as I'd like.  

 

By the way, thanks to all of you who posted titles of books about home libraries (ages ago).  I got some great ideas after perusing some of them and our library will hopefully be finished within the next few months!


 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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LuvReading
Posts: 89
Registered: ‎04-05-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hello all!  I've been in and out of the B&N Bookclubs/University for years and love it!  I got very lucky and had time that coincided with the Aeneid!!!  I've always loved ancient history (particularly that of Troy, Greece, Rome, etc.).  I look forward to FINALLY reading this book and discussing it.  I have a bit of catching up to do!

 

Tammie

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Laurel
Posts: 5,747
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Welcome, Tammie! We're traveling rather slowly through The Aeneid, so you have plenty of time. Feel free to chime any at any point along the way.

LuvReading wrote:

Hello all!  I've been in and out of the B&N Bookclubs/University for years and love it!  I got very lucky and had time that coincided with the Aeneid!!!  I've always loved ancient history (particularly that of Troy, Greece, Rome, etc.).  I look forward to FINALLY reading this book and discussing it.  I have a bit of catching up to do!

 

Tammie


 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Inspired Contributor
mapleann
Posts: 44
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Wow, am I ever moving slowly through the Aeneid. I am thoroughly enjoying it, but I tend to only read it when I have ablsolute silence and I typically read it aloud. I am now on Book 6, and I am starting to move a little faster. I hope to keep my present pace and finish prior to the end of February.

 

I want to thank everyone for their wonderful links and insights. It has enabled me to get more out of it. I still get confused on my Greek/Roman gods and some of the characters' names. Otherwise, I think I am comprehending just fine. It would just mean more if I had more knowledge to allow me to properly analyze the text for hidden diamonds of meaning.

 

Can anyone tell me why the number 3 is so prominent in the story? Does it have to do with Christianity? Or, does it have to do with Rome having co-rulers or battles for the throne? Or were there not 3 wars with Carthage? 

 

I am probably getting things mixed-up. My knowledge of Roman history is haphazard and incomplete.

 

THanks for any help on this one. I have circled the number three/tri every time I come across it in my book.

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Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hi, Mapleann. Glad you're still with us! The slow, careful reading that you are doing will make it that much pore pleasant the next time you read The Aeneid, and it will start to open up many other books to you, too. At least that's what happened to me.

 

I didn't notice the number three so much in this book. It seeems to be a number that's ingrained into our beings, because it crops up as prominent in many different cultures and eras. You'll have to point out some of the uses you found in The Aeneid. Anyone else have any thoughts on it?

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

 I am right beside you, MapleAnn.  Ever since I got behind on War and Peace, I haven't been able to keep up with the Epics board!  I do want to catch up before we get to Dante, however, and The Aeneid seems to be "necessary" preparation.

 

I just finished listening to Book 6 in the Fagles translation while reading the Fitzgerald translation. They are so different!  And I like them both -- very much.  This morning, I was reading out loud what I figured would be one track and then listening and reading together -- at least until about track 8, then I just finished them out the final five together.

 

Yesterday, I finished the Teaching Company notes, but I do want to listen to at least those on Chapter 6 again.

 

It was the number seven that I noticed, at least a few times.  Humankind has always had a special fascination with the smaller prime numbers, it seems (I.e., those divisible only by one and themselves).  I will keep out a watch for the number three now.

 

Now for a few minutes of starting to catch up on the notes here.

 

 

Pepper


mapleann wrote:

Wow, am I ever moving slowly through the Aeneid. I am thoroughly enjoying it, but I tend to only read it when I have ablsolute silence and I typically read it aloud. I am now on Book 6, and I am starting to move a little faster. I hope to keep my present pace and finish prior to the end of February.

 

I want to thank everyone for their wonderful links and insights. It has enabled me to get more out of it. I still get confused on my Greek/Roman gods and some of the characters' names. Otherwise, I think I am comprehending just fine. It would just mean more if I had more knowledge to allow me to properly analyze the text for hidden diamonds of meaning.

 

Can anyone tell me why the number 3 is so prominent in the story? Does it have to do with Christianity? Or, does it have to do with Rome having co-rulers or battles for the throne? Or were there not 3 wars with Carthage? 

 

I am probably getting things mixed-up. My knowledge of Roman history is haphazard and incomplete.

 

THanks for any help on this one. I have circled the number three/tri every time I come across it in my book.


"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Good for you for plugging along, Pepper! Book 6 will be very improtand for Dante.

 

You shouldn't have much troublekeeping up with Dante, since we'll spend six months with him.


Peppermill wrote:

 I am right beside you, MapleAnn.  Ever since I got behind on War and Peace, I haven't been able to keep up with the Epics board!  I do want to catch up before we get to Dante, however, and The Aeneid seems to be "necessary" preparation.

 

I just finished listening to Book 6 in the Fagles translation while reading the Fitzgerald translation. They are so different!  And I like them both -- very much.  This morning, I was reading out loud what I figured would be one track and then listening and reading together -- at least until about track 8, then I just finished them out the final five together.

 

Yesterday, I finished the Teaching Company notes, but I do want to listen to at least those on Chapter 6 again.

 

It was the number seven that I noticed, at least a few times.  Humankind has always had a special fascination with the smaller prime numbers, it seems (I.e., those divisible only by one and themselves).  I will keep out a watch for the number three now.

 

Now for a few minutes of starting to catch up on the notes here.

 

 

Pepper



 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Contributor
RickyNeil
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hello. I used to do the BNU, and got too busy (I teach High School Social Studies), and just recently saw that Barnes and Noble was still doing classes.

 

I love to read the Epics as you are calling them. I am rereading The Aenid and look forward to reading Dante (probably for the 5th or 6th time). I have even read Dante in Italian. The Longfellow translation is a favorite of mine, as well as, the Dorothy L. Sayers translation.

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Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hello, RickyNeil. It's great to have you along with us. I look forward to your comments. This isn't really a class, but we all do a good job of teaching each other. I know that I learn a lot!

RickyNeil wrote:

Hello. I used to do the BNU, and got too busy (I teach High School Social Studies), and just recently saw that Barnes and Noble was still doing classes.

 

I love to read the Epics as you are calling them. I am rereading The Aenid and look forward to reading Dante (probably for the 5th or 6th time). I have even read Dante in Italian. The Longfellow translation is a favorite of mine, as well as, the Dorothy L. Sayers translation.


 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Urizen
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎02-28-2009
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hello all!  I'm looking forward to participating in the discussions about the material scheduled over the next several months!
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Welcome, Urizen! We're glad to have you.

Urizen wrote:
Hello all!  I'm looking forward to participating in the discussions about the material scheduled over the next several months!

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton