Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Reader-Moderator
bdNM
Posts: 470
Registered: ‎11-22-2006
0 Kudos

Questions and observations -- "Song of Hiawatha" IV ("Hiawatha and Mudjekeewis")

  • In line 2 we have "Now had grown my Hiawatha..."  Who's speaking here?  I know that poets sometimes address a character in their poem, and Longfellow seems to be doing something like that here, but I find this a bit jarring.
  • Later, as Mudjekeewis "boasted of his ancient prowess..." I got to thinking about Beowulf and all the boasting of the Germanic hero.  And the boasting is later referred to as "grand and gracious," which seems a strange descriptive for boasting.
  • And Hiawatha sits "patiently... listening to his father's boasting..."  In reading the Tony Hillerman mystery novels, much is made of patience in listening to another.  When the Navaho detectives go to interview someone, there is no rush, even if the matter is urgent.  In this case, though, Hiawatha is all hot and bothered -- but I'm not sure why.  He is clearly upset: "but his heart was hot within him,/like a living coal his heart was."
  • What are these mittens that Hiawatha has later, when he grabs hold of the crag and hurls it at Mudjekeewis?  Made me think of Grendel's glove.
  • "Keneu, the great war-eagle" -- this seems a lot like the Beasts of Battle you encounter in AS poetry.
  • When Mudjekeewis sends Hiawatha back, urging him to "slay all monsters and magicians," it seemed a lot like myth where the hero slays some awful beast and makes life habitable for regular folk (Hercules' labors, for instance).
  • Hiawatha gearing up with arrows from "the ancient Arrow-maker" reminded me of Beowulf and his mail shirt made by Wayland the Smith.

 

Dignity, always dignity.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Questions and observations -- "Song of Hiawatha" IV

[ Edited ]

Hiawatha gearing up with arrows from "the ancient Arrow-maker" reminded me of Beowulf and his mail shirt made by Wayland the Smith.

 

Or the armor Hephaestus (Vulcan) forged for Achilles at the direction of his mother Thetis? 

 

Book 18 of The Iliad

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Reader-Moderator
bdNM
Posts: 470
Registered: ‎11-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Questions and observations -- "Song of Hiawatha" IV

And Vulcan for Aeneas in the Aeneid, too.

Dignity, always dignity.
Frequent Contributor
Lmfwhite
Posts: 185
Registered: ‎07-07-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Questions and observations -- "Song of Hiawatha" IV

bdNM wrote:

  • In line 2 we have "Now had grown my Hiawatha..."  Who's speaking here?  I know that poets sometimes address a character in their poem, and Longfellow seems to be doing something like that here, but I find this a bit jarring.
  • And Hiawatha sits "patiently... listening to his father's boasting..."  In reading the Tony Hillerman mystery novels, much is made of patience in listening to another.  When the Navaho detectives go to interview someone, there is no rush, even if the matter is urgent.  In this case, though, Hiawatha is all hot and bothered -- but I'm not sure why.  He is clearly upset: "but his heart was hot within him,/like a living coal his heart was."

 

I have been noting all the quotes that have "my Hiawatha" in it but I am still clueless as to who is talking. The first reference was in Chapter III - Hiawatha's Childhood..."Thus was born my Hiawatha".  Your reference is the second, the third one is in Chapter VIII, and the fourth one in Chapter IX.  I know I'm getting ahead of what I should be talking about, but even that far into the poem, I still do not know who is talking.

 

As for Hiawatha being all "hot and bothered", I interpreted that to mean that he was getting upset listening to his dad's boasting, when he knew all along that Mudjekeewis was responsible for Wenonah's death.