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Laurel
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Re: Question

Here is the Forty Stories by Chekhov link.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Laurel
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The Great Unread

Great Unread Books: Which classic are you ashamed to admit you have never read?

 

Anyone want to join the confessional?

 

Mine would be Don Quixote, but that shall change.

 

Some of the books mentioned here I would be ashamed to admit having read.

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Everyman
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Re: The Great Unread

Been there.  My admission was Moby Dick, even though I taught English and American literature.
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Laurel
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Re: The Great Unread

Let's just hope you remedy that soon. Your life will be richer for it.

 


Everyman wrote:
Been there.  My admission was Moby Dick, even though I taught English and American literature.

 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Everyman
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Re: The Great Unread

I've tried it multiple times.  I'm not at all convinced that finishing it will add anything at all tomy life, other than the waste of many hours I could spending reading (or re-rading) books I WANT to read.  Like War and Peace!


Laurel wrote:

Let's just hope you remedy that soon. Your life will be richer for it.

 


Everyman wrote:
Been there.  My admission was Moby Dick, even though I taught English and American literature.

 

 


 

 

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I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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va-BBoomer
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Re: The Great Unread

I am a bit horrified when I think of what I haven’t read.  But at the same time, I am grateful for a fabulous English Department in high school that had some great classics on its required reading for the 4 years.  I read then: Homer’s Odyssey; Moby Dick; Ivanhoe; Rime of the Ancient Mariner; Hawthorne’s Scarlett Letter; House of the Seven Gables; The Yearling; Silas Marner; Idyls of the King; Dickens’ Tale of Two Cities; Shakespeare:  Hamlet, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar; The Good Earth; Gulliver’s Travels; Ibsen’s A Doll’s House; Hemingway’s Old Man and The Sea; to name a few.  On my own, I read Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, two favorites of mine.

 

Books I’ve missed:  most of Faulkner; tried Ulysses and Portrait of an Artist… but guess I was too young to absorb;  Don Quixote ; Dante’s Inferno; Paradise Lost as a whole (I missed the read here);  more Hemingway; Steinbeck;  Proust; so many others I hope to someday read.  I have to remember which books I haven't read, and what movies of them I've seen instead; examples: Pride and Prejudice, The Grapes of Wrath.

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Laurel
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Re: The Great Unread

You went to an amazing high school, Boomer!

 

We'll be giving you a chance to read Dante and Cervantes soon.


va-BBoomer wrote:

I am a bit horrified when I think of what I haven’t read.  But at the same time, I am grateful for a fabulous English Department in high school that had some great classics on its required reading for the 4 years.  I read then: Homer’s Odyssey; Moby Dick; Ivanhoe; Rime of the Ancient Mariner; Hawthorne’s Scarlett Letter; House of the Seven Gables; The Yearling; Silas Marner; Idyls of the King; Dickens’ Tale of Two Cities; Shakespeare:  Hamlet, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar; The Good Earth; Gulliver’s Travels; Ibsen’s A Doll’s House; Hemingway’s Old Man and The Sea; to name a few.  On my own, I read Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, two favorites of mine.

 

Books I’ve missed:  most of Faulkner; tried Ulysses and Portrait of an Artist… but guess I was too young to absorb;  Don Quixote ; Dante’s Inferno; Paradise Lost as a whole (I missed the read here);  more Hemingway; Steinbeck;  Proust; so many others I hope to someday read.  I have to remember which books I haven't read, and what movies of them I've seen instead; examples: Pride and Prejudice, The Grapes of Wrath.


 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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DebbieM
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Re: The Great Unread

Dante is lots of fun and there are so many direct and indirect references to his work throughout literature -- well worth reading!

 

I can't say the same for Don Quixote.  It was quite a disappointment -- Not much there except its historical status as the first "novel."  Far better examples of the early genre are found in Chaucer and even The Decameron, by Boccaccio.  Chaucer especially is hilarious!

 

Les Miserables is one I've never read.


Debbie

Books, like friends, should be few and well-chosen.
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Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.  Joseph Addison

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Laurel
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Re: The Great Unread

That's been my impression of Don Quixote, too, each time I'm tried to get into it. I'm hoping someone here can convince me otherwise. I love the musical!

 

Good choice of signature quotes, Debbie!

 

Books, like friends, should be few and well-chosen. Samuel Johnson
Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.  Joseph Addison

 


DebbieM wrote:

Dante is lots of fun and there are so many direct and indirect references to his work throughout literature -- well worth reading!

 

I can't say the same for Don Quixote.  It was quite a disappointment -- Not much there except its historical status as the first "novel."  Far better examples of the early genre are found in Chaucer and even The Decameron, by Boccaccio.  Chaucer especially is hilarious!

 

Les Miserables is one I've never read.


 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: The Great Unread

Laurel wrote:

Let's just hope you remedy that soon. Your life will be richer for it [Moby Dick].

 

I read and thoroughly enjoyed Moby Dick on B&N last year with Bob Fanuzzi as Moderator. But I think I will read it again in September when I am going to Southern Ireland to watch whales!  Perhaps I will be able to upload it onto my new Sony E-reader, which I should have by then! 

 

The biggest gap in my reading is in Amerian literature although I have read Steinbeck, Faulkner, Mailer and some other moderns which we have covered here, Hawthorne, Wharton etc.  I am pretty well up to scratch on British and European classical stuff but there are always huge gaps however hard you try to catch up!  

 

 

 


 

 


 

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In search of Western civilisation's lost classics

Has anyone heard about this?
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: In search of Western civilisation's lost classics

I went to the Villa di Papyri when I visited Pompeii about 4 years ago - it is an amazing place with exhibitions of great antiquity. It sounds as if they have discovered even more artefacts for our delight and delectation:smileyhappy:.  I found that being in the presence of such antiquity was a great thrill. 

 

 


Laurel wrote:
Has anyone heard about this?

 

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Laurel
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St. Deiniol's Library

How would you like to spend a week or more living in this library? (I'm not offering, just mentioning.)
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: St. Deiniol's Library

[ Edited ]

I was there the year before last!  My grand-daughter was doing some work experience at  Aberyswyth University and I spent a wet afternoon at St Dieniols Library. It is beautiful, has a great atmosphere and a lovely old book smell too:smileyhappy:.    

 


Laurel wrote:
How would you like to spend a week or more living in this library? (I'm not offering, just mentioning.)

 

Message Edited by Choisya on 08-16-2008 02:21 PM
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Laurel
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Re: St. Deiniol's Library

What fun!

 


Choisya wrote:

I was there the year before last!  My grand-daughter was doing some work experience at  Aberyswyth University and I spent a wet afternoon at St Dieniols Library. It is beautiful, has a great atmosphere and a lovely old book smell too:smileyhappy:.    

 


Laurel wrote:
How would you like to spend a week or more living in this library? (I'm not offering, just mentioning.)

 

Message Edited by Choisya on 08-16-2008 02:21 PM

 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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PaulK
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Re: The Great Unread

A couple of years ago I would have listed Moby Dick, Paradise Lost, and War and Peace among others. Thanks to the wonderful experience starting with the old BNU I have closed my classics reading gap by a considerable amount and have experienced much pleasure. The only books that I have not enjoyed were Darwin, Walden Pond and the never ending parts of Moby Dick regarding detailed discussions of whales and whaling.

If only I can finish W&P. So far 200 pages done and only 1,015 more to go!


Laurel wrote:

Great Unread Books: Which classic are you ashamed to admit you have never read?

 

Anyone want to join the confessional?

 

Mine would be Don Quixote, but that shall change.

 

Some of the books mentioned here I would be ashamed to admit having read.


 

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Laurel
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Re: THE LIBRARY

Sunday's The New York Times has a brief review of Edith Hall's The Return of Ulysses: A Cultural History of Homer’s Odyssey.

 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Laurel
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George Orwell Blog--70 years later

When George Orwell was in a TB sanitorium in England he kept a detailed diary. Now someone is publishing it on the web each day. Here is an article about it in The New York Times, and here is the blog page.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Laurel
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Solzhenitsyn and the censors

This is a beautiful piece, and it expresses what I have tried to say about censorship.

 

It’s probably heresy to say so, but it seems censorship in its more benign manifestations — along with a skilled editor — was good for Solzhenitsyn’s prose, forcing some of the compression and ellipses that contribute so much to the power of “Ivan Denisovich” and, to a lesser extent, the other early novels.
 
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Peppermill
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Re: Solzhenitsyn and the censorshttp://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/util/emoticonspopuppage#

One of the few I passed over tonight. :smileysad:  Thanks for bringing it to our attention, Laurel!

 


Laurel wrote:

This is a beautiful piece, and it expresses what I have tried to say about censorship.

 

It’s probably heresy to say so, but it seems censorship in its more benign manifestations — along with a skilled editor — was good for Solzhenitsyn’s prose, forcing some of the compression and ellipses that contribute so much to the power of “Ivan Denisovich” and, to a lesser extent, the other early novels.

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy