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Laurel
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THE ODYSSEY Book 22--The Suitors Killed

Summary:
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Antinous, ringleader of the suitors, is just lifting a drinking cup when Odysseus puts an arrow through his throat.

The goatherd sneaks out and comes back with shields and spears for the suitors, but now Athena appears. She sends the suitors' spearthrusts wide, as Odysseus, Telemachus and the two faithful herdsmen strike with volley after volley of lances.

They finish off the work with swords. Those of the housemaids who had consorted with the suitors are hung by the neck in the courtyard, while the treacherous goatherd is chopped to bits.
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Pretty gory stuff!

Johnston's translation.

Notice his first note and this map of the palace.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Everyman
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Re: THE ODYSSEY Book 22--The Suitors Killed

Shades of the Iliad, with its graphic descriptions of death.
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Laurel
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Re: THE ODYSSEY Book 22--The Suitors Killed

Exactly. But for a much shorter time.

Everyman wrote:
Shades of the Iliad, with its graphic descriptions of death.


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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WildCityWoman
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Re: THE ODYSSEY Book 22--The Suitors Killed

It was a bit much . . .  kinda' funny, really - like some hyped up fight in a fantasy novel.
 
But it sets me to thinking about 'gods' again . . . now that I've listened to the whole story, I understand how the early Greeks didn't worship gods in the same way we do.
 
Their 'gods' were more like supernatural people - they weren't always kind gods. We don't think of going to God to ask for His help on how to kill people.
 
Were we to ask God for help in getting unwanted guests out of the house, it would be for personal strength of mind and character - we'd ask for insight on how to 'move' them in some way. We'd ask for the courage to tell the people to get out - don't come back.
 
 
Carly

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Laurel
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Re: THE ODYSSEY Book 22--The Suitors Killed

It's really a huge difference, isn't it? I guess the Greek gods were convenient at times.

WildCityWoman wrote:
It was a bit much . . . kinda' funny, really - like some hyped up fight in a fantasy novel.
But it sets me to thinking about 'gods' again . . . now that I've listened to the whole story, I understand how the early Greeks didn't worship gods in the same way we do.
Their 'gods' were more like supernatural people - they weren't always kind gods. We don't think of going to God to ask for His help on how to kill people.
Were we to ask God for help in getting unwanted guests out of the house, it would be for personal strength of mind and character - we'd ask for insight on how to 'move' them in some way. We'd ask for the courage to tell the people to get out - don't come back.



"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Timbuktu1
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Re: THE ODYSSEY Book 22--The Suitors Killed



WildCityWoman wrote:
It was a bit much . . .  kinda' funny, really - like some hyped up fight in a fantasy novel.
 
But it sets me to thinking about 'gods' again . . . now that I've listened to the whole story, I understand how the early Greeks didn't worship gods in the same way we do.
 
Their 'gods' were more like supernatural people - they weren't always kind gods. We don't think of going to God to ask for His help on how to kill people.
 
Were we to ask God for help in getting unwanted guests out of the house, it would be for personal strength of mind and character - we'd ask for insight on how to 'move' them in some way. We'd ask for the courage to tell the people to get out - don't come back.
 
 





When I was reading the Odyssey and the Iliad, a few months ago, I got curious about the gods too. I read a bit of "The Greeks and Their Gods", a book I'd had since college. The author compared the Greek gods to aristocracy. They could fight amongst themselves but god help anyone from the lower (mortal) class who dares defy them.
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bdNM
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Re: THE ODYSSEY Book 22--The Suitors Killed

Except in a domestic setting, the horror of the actions comes across more, perhaps.  We expect it in the Iliad, but in the homey setting of the Odyssey, it really stands out.  Also the hanging of the slave women seems a bit over the top.
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Laurel
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Re: THE ODYSSEY Book 22--The Suitors Killed

You're right!

bdNM wrote:
Except in a domestic setting, the horror of the actions comes across more, perhaps. We expect it in the Iliad, but in the homey setting of the Odyssey, it really stands out. Also the hanging of the slave women seems a bit over the top.



"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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KristyR
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Re: THE ODYSSEY Book 22--The Suitors Killed



bdNM wrote:
Except in a domestic setting, the horror of the actions comes across more, perhaps.  We expect it in the Iliad, but in the homey setting of the Odyssey, it really stands out.  Also the hanging of the slave women seems a bit over the top.



First he makes the slave maids haul out the bodies of their dead lovers, then he makes them clean up their blood and gore, and finally he hangs them... eek!
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Everyman
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Re: THE ODYSSEY Book 22--The Suitors Killed

You don't think they deserved it?

KristyR wrote:


bdNM wrote:
Except in a domestic setting, the horror of the actions comes across more, perhaps.  We expect it in the Iliad, but in the homey setting of the Odyssey, it really stands out.  Also the hanging of the slave women seems a bit over the top.



First he makes the slave maids haul out the bodies of their dead lovers, then he makes them clean up their blood and gore, and finally he hangs them... eek!


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KristyR
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Re: THE ODYSSEY Book 22--The Suitors Killed



Everyman wrote:
You don't think they deserved it?

KristyR wrote:


bdNM wrote:
Except in a domestic setting, the horror of the actions comes across more, perhaps.  We expect it in the Iliad, but in the homey setting of the Odyssey, it really stands out.  Also the hanging of the slave women seems a bit over the top.



First he makes the slave maids haul out the bodies of their dead lovers, then he makes them clean up their blood and gore, and finally he hangs them... eek!





I suspect, in that day and age, they got what was coming to them. I wonder, back when Homer was reciting The Odyssey, would his audience cheer at this point? Or would it turn their stomachs just a little?
Another thing I just thought of, I wonder if these slave maids were even alive when Odysseus went off to war? If they'd ever even seen their Master? Even if they hadn't, they should have still been loyal to Penelope and Telemachus.