Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

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We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Laurel
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Off-topic conversations

I've been to Whidby Island many times through the years. Beautiful place, and th egetting there is beautiful, too.

WildCityWoman wrote:

Do you Seattle people know anybody on Whibney Island? I think it's near there.

 

 



"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Off-topic conversations

I am also a dogged follower of what Laurel creates for us here on the Epics Board for B&N. I can't say enough credos for the gifts of time, enthusiasm, knowledge, research, ... that she gives us. It has been my privilege to greatly deepen my reading of literature under her tutelage. I look forward to continuing the journey with War and Peace.

 

Hear Hear!!

 

 


Peppermill wrote:

The two minute elevator talk -- that paragraph or two that we are supposed to be able to produce to quickly introduce ourselves -- how I always struggle. But Laurel did ask her participants here to introduce ourselves.

 

An avid reader, but that obviously is not unique in this company, I am also a dogged follower of what Laurel creates for us here on the Epics Board for B&N. I can't say enough credos for the gifts of time, enthusiasm, knowledge, research, ... that she gives us. It has been my privilege to greatly deepen my reading of literature under her tutelage. I look forward to continuing the journey with War and Peace.

 

Pepper

 

 


 

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Laurel
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Off-topic conversations

Ladies, ladies! You're supposed to be talking about yourselves! I'm stricktly an amateur, and learing as I go.

 


Choisya wrote:

I am also a dogged follower of what Laurel creates for us here on the Epics Board for B&N. I can't say enough credos for the gifts of time, enthusiasm, knowledge, research, ... that she gives us. It has been my privilege to greatly deepen my reading of literature under her tutelage. I look forward to continuing the journey with War and Peace.

 

Hear Hear!!

 

 


Peppermill wrote:

The two minute elevator talk -- that paragraph or two that we are supposed to be able to produce to quickly introduce ourselves -- how I always struggle. But Laurel did ask her participants here to introduce ourselves.

 

An avid reader, but that obviously is not unique in this company, I am also a dogged follower of what Laurel creates for us here on the Epics Board for B&N. I can't say enough credos for the gifts of time, enthusiasm, knowledge, research, ... that she gives us. It has been my privilege to greatly deepen my reading of literature under her tutelage. I look forward to continuing the journey with War and Peace.

 

Pepper

 

 


 


 

 

 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Laurel
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--The Passing of a Giant

From a BBC article about Solzhenisyn:

 

As a 10-year-old Alexander Solzhenitsyn had already read Tolstoy's War and Peace and was trying his hand at writing stories and poems.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Qualifications

And it is odd to think that Tolstoy did not do very well at school!

 

Neither did my eldest daughter and yet we were teasing her at the weekend that if we were to put all her professional and academic qualifications on an address label it would take up two lines!

 

Do Americans still use 'letters' after their names?  It has become very de trop here since the 60s.  I once worked with a group of distinguished economists and statisticians and one morning a new employee joined us and promptly put a card in the nameplate outside his door which said J Bloggs BA(Econ).  After lunch I noticed that all the other (male) employees had put cards in their nameplates but without exception their qualifications were much longer and more impressive than the new employee's.  The following morning we all noted that our female director, a very distinguished statistician and Fellow of the Royal Society of Statisticians, had put against her name BOSS.  All the name cards were soon removed! 

 


Laurel wrote:

From a BBC article about Solzhenisyn:

 

As a 10-year-old Alexander Solzhenitsyn had already read Tolstoy's War and Peace and was trying his hand at writing stories and poems.

 

  

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PaulK
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Qualifications

I have never seen an undergraduate degree listed on a nameplate or namecard in the US or internationally. For that matter I never saw a Master's degree listed. I have been surprised that even some PhD's downplay their degrees. Professional credentials like CPA or CFA are more likely to be listed.

 

Some people do not do well in school because they are almost too smart for it. Tolstoy, Einstein and Bill Gates may be examples. Some people don't do well in school because they get distracted because they have freedom  for the first time. I have alays been fascinated by the correlation of academic success and success in business. I find many successful people without impressive backgrounds. I fit in the category of people distracted by other things in college but did just fine in my career and completed graduate work later to fill up my precieved shortcomings. I have always had the highest respect for education but have remained skeptical of its predictive ability of job success in business. However none of this prevented me from doing everything to insure my children took their education very seriously.

 


Choisya wrote:

And it is odd to think that Tolstoy did not do very well at school!

 

Neither did my eldest daughter and yet we were teasing her at the weekend that if we were to put all her professional and academic qualifications on an address label it would take up two lines!

 

Do Americans still use 'letters' after their names?  It has become very de trop here since the 60s.  I once worked with a group of distinguished economists and statisticians and one morning a new employee joined us and promptly put a card in the nameplate outside his door which said J Bloggs BA(Econ).  After lunch I noticed that all the other (male) employees had put cards in their nameplates but without exception their qualifications were much longer and more impressive than the new employee's.  The following morning we all noted that our female director, a very distinguished statistician and Fellow of the Royal Society of Statisticians, had put against her name BOSS.  All the name cards were soon removed! 

 


Laurel wrote:

From a BBC article about Solzhenisyn:

 

As a 10-year-old Alexander Solzhenitsyn had already read Tolstoy's War and Peace and was trying his hand at writing stories and poems.

 

  


 

Melissa_W
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Qualifications

Most people here don't put undergraduate degrees on a card, but nearly everyone I know puts graduate degrees and professional credentials on a card (including me).  If I send an email from my work account, the signature line begins with "Melissa ..., MS" and I also tend to include the "MS" when I "mean business" (i.e. someone is about to get a smackdown).  I used to work in the pathology lab and everyone there was a certified clinical laboratory scientist and was required to put "ASCP" or other accredited credentials on their hospital ID and busness cards.

 

This practice may be more common in the sciences than in the humanities (I know that social workers are required to use "LSW" or "MSW" as well).


Choisya wrote:

And it is odd to think that Tolstoy did not do very well at school!

 

Neither did my eldest daughter and yet we were teasing her at the weekend that if we were to put all her professional and academic qualifications on an address label it would take up two lines!

 

Do Americans still use 'letters' after their names?  It has become very de trop here since the 60s.  I once worked with a group of distinguished economists and statisticians and one morning a new employee joined us and promptly put a card in the nameplate outside his door which said J Bloggs BA(Econ).  After lunch I noticed that all the other (male) employees had put cards in their nameplates but without exception their qualifications were much longer and more impressive than the new employee's.  The following morning we all noted that our female director, a very distinguished statistician and Fellow of the Royal Society of Statisticians, had put against her name BOSS.  All the name cards were soon removed! 

 


Laurel wrote:

From a BBC article about Solzhenisyn:

 

As a 10-year-old Alexander Solzhenitsyn had already read Tolstoy's War and Peace and was trying his hand at writing stories and poems.

 

  


 

Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
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Laurel
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Qualifications

I have a Litt. D. but I never use it, except sometimes when I'm traveling. A Dr. X sometimes speeds things up.

 


pedsphleb wrote:

Most people here don't put undergraduate degrees on a card, but nearly everyone I know puts graduate degrees and professional credentials on a card (including me).  If I send an email from my work account, the signature line begins with "Melissa ..., MS" and I also tend to include the "MS" when I "mean business" (i.e. someone is about to get a smackdown).  I used to work in the pathology lab and everyone there was a certified clinical laboratory scientist and was required to put "ASCP" or other accredited credentials on their hospital ID and busness cards.

 

This practice may be more common in the sciences than in the humanities (I know that social workers are required to use "LSW" or "MSW" as well).


Choisya wrote:

And it is odd to think that Tolstoy did not do very well at school!

 

Neither did my eldest daughter and yet we were teasing her at the weekend that if we were to put all her professional and academic qualifications on an address label it would take up two lines!

 

Do Americans still use 'letters' after their names?  It has become very de trop here since the 60s.  I once worked with a group of distinguished economists and statisticians and one morning a new employee joined us and promptly put a card in the nameplate outside his door which said J Bloggs BA(Econ).  After lunch I noticed that all the other (male) employees had put cards in their nameplates but without exception their qualifications were much longer and more impressive than the new employee's.  The following morning we all noted that our female director, a very distinguished statistician and Fellow of the Royal Society of Statisticians, had put against her name BOSS.  All the name cards were soon removed! 

 


Laurel wrote:

From a BBC article about Solzhenisyn:

 

As a 10-year-old Alexander Solzhenitsyn had already read Tolstoy's War and Peace and was trying his hand at writing stories and poems.

 

  


 


 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Peppermill
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Qualifications

Despite the fact a very high percentage of its professionals had Ph.D.'s, the culture at Bell Laboratories was to not use the title very much, if at all, internally. Of course, it was used for publications in journals and even on business cards.


pedsphleb wrote:

Most people here don't put undergraduate degrees on a card, but nearly everyone I know puts graduate degrees and professional credentials on a card (including me).  If I send an email from my work account, the signature line begins with "Melissa ..., MS" and I also tend to include the "MS" when I "mean business" (i.e. someone is about to get a smackdown).  I used to work in the pathology lab and everyone there was a certified clinical laboratory scientist and was required to put "ASCP" or other accredited credentials on their hospital ID and busness cards.

 

This practice may be more common in the sciences than in the humanities (I know that social workers are required to use "LSW" or "MSW" as well).


Choisya wrote:

And it is odd to think that Tolstoy did not do very well at school!

 

Neither did my eldest daughter and yet we were teasing her at the weekend that if we were to put all her professional and academic qualifications on an address label it would take up two lines!

 

Do Americans still use 'letters' after their names?  It has become very de trop here since the 60s.  I once worked with a group of distinguished economists and statisticians and one morning a new employee joined us and promptly put a card in the nameplate outside his door which said J Bloggs BA(Econ).  After lunch I noticed that all the other (male) employees had put cards in their nameplates but without exception their qualifications were much longer and more impressive than the new employee's.  The following morning we all noted that our female director, a very distinguished statistician and Fellow of the Royal Society of Statisticians, had put against her name BOSS.  All the name cards were soon removed! 

 


Laurel wrote:

From a BBC article about Solzhenisyn:

 

As a 10-year-old Alexander Solzhenitsyn had already read Tolstoy's War and Peace and was trying his hand at writing stories and poems.



 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Happy29fan
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Off-topic conversations

Hello everyone!

 

My name is Kelly and I live in Bellflower, California.  I love to read!  My taste in books tends to run mostly to mass market mystery/thrillers and science-fiction/fantasy; however, I am trying to broaden my horizons and read more classical books. I have the Peaver translation, but found it too bulky and heavy to read while commuting to and from work.  I am now reading the Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition translated by Briggs.  This edition is still somewhat bulky, but I have found it a little easier reading.  I'll probably be lurking more than posting.  I have been really enjoying all the insightful posts and links!

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Peppermill
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Off-topic conversations

[ Edited ]

Welcome! I hope you will post, at least from time to time. As I have said only too often, sometimes the slenderest post can provide just that insight oneself has missed!

 

How brave to read this as a commuter -- public transportation, I assume. I have a very old Penguin Classics edition that must have been published in two or more parts -- I have only the first volume. It was translated by Rosemary Edmonds. It is what I am currently carrying with me when I want to read W&P on the move. I don't know what I will do when I get beyond that first volume. I read P&V's translation sitting at a table -- and I almost never read in that position -- except art books and other tomes (and a PC screen). R.E. is also a help when the P&V translation seems unclear or I just want to know how another translator approached a passage. I also found a Maude translation in a used bookstore when I was really looking for something else. It has some wonderful pictures. But, I have been known to tear apart an inexpensive copy of a book to read sections while commuting.

 

Pepper

Message Edited by Peppermill on 08-07-2008 01:52 AM
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Choisya
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Qualifications

Yes, titles are used on company letterheads and business cards here too, particularly when it is important that the public know that those conducting business on the firm's behalf are well qualified to do so.   As Melissa posted, this is more common in the sciences than in the arts.  I suspect that my daughter more often needs to inform people that she is a Fellow of the Institute of Building than that she is also a Bachelor of Education.  In politics qualifications are very rarely used because it is a profession where political experience is more important that formal qualifications.  I have academic qualifications in the political sciences but neither of the Prime Ministers I worked for had, nor any of the Ministers.  PM Harold Wilson was sometimes referred to in the press as 'an Oxford Don' but he himself would never refer to his distinguished academic background and would prefer to stress his working class upbringing and scholarship to grammar school.    

 


Peppermill wrote:

Despite the fact a very high percentage of its professionals had Ph.D.'s, the culture at Bell Laboratories was to not use the title very much, if at all, internally. Of course, it was used for publications in journals and even on business cards.


pedsphleb wrote:

Most people here don't put undergraduate degrees on a card, but nearly everyone I know puts graduate degrees and professional credentials on a card (including me).  If I send an email from my work account, the signature line begins with "Melissa ..., MS" and I also tend to include the "MS" when I "mean business" (i.e. someone is about to get a smackdown).  I used to work in the pathology lab and everyone there was a certified clinical laboratory scientist and was required to put "ASCP" or other accredited credentials on their hospital ID and busness cards.

 

This practice may be more common in the sciences than in the humanities (I know that social workers are required to use "LSW" or "MSW" as well).


Choisya wrote:

And it is odd to think that Tolstoy did not do very well at school!

 

Neither did my eldest daughter and yet we were teasing her at the weekend that if we were to put all her professional and academic qualifications on an address label it would take up two lines!

 

Do Americans still use 'letters' after their names?  It has become very de trop here since the 60s.  I once worked with a group of distinguished economists and statisticians and one morning a new employee joined us and promptly put a card in the nameplate outside his door which said J Bloggs BA(Econ).  After lunch I noticed that all the other (male) employees had put cards in their nameplates but without exception their qualifications were much longer and more impressive than the new employee's.  The following morning we all noted that our female director, a very distinguished statistician and Fellow of the Royal Society of Statisticians, had put against her name BOSS.  All the name cards were soon removed! 

 


Laurel wrote:

From a BBC article about Solzhenisyn:

 

As a 10-year-old Alexander Solzhenitsyn had already read Tolstoy's War and Peace and was trying his hand at writing stories and poems.



 

 


 

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Choisya
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Off-topic conversations

[ Edited ]

Commuting is heaven-sent to the avid reader isn't it?  Not only can you forget the noisy, often dirty surroundings you are in but you can get through your book list at a rate of knots!  Even though I am now retired and have plenty of time for reading, I don't think I get through as many books as I did when travelling daily on the London underground.  

 

It is interesting too to see what other commuters are reading and in London it is often an indication of what is currently on the bestsellers list or what is on the English Literature 'A' level list - I remember that Jekyll and Hyde was quite popular last year!  And when TV bring out a classic serial you see books like 'Pride & Prejudice' or 'Cranford' being read in the new editions. 

 

 

 


Peppermill wrote:

Welcome! I hope you will post, at least from time to time. As I have said only too often, sometimes the slenderest post can provide just that insight oneself has missed!

 

How brave to read this as a commuter -- public transportation, I assume. I have a very old Penguin Classics edition that must have been published in two or more parts -- I have only the first volume. It was translated by Rosemary Edmonds. It is what I am currently carrying with me when I want to read W&P on the move. I don't know what I will do when I get beyond that first volume. I read P&V's translation sitting at a table -- and I almost never read in that position -- except art books and other tomes (and a PC screen). R.E. is also a help when the P&V translation seems unclear or I just want to know how another translator approached a passage. I also found a Maude translation in a used bookstore when I was really looking for something else. It has some wonderful pictures. But, I have been known to tear apart an inexpensive copy of a book to read sections while commuting.

 

Pepper

 

Message Edited by Choisya on 08-07-2008 07:42 AM
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Laurel
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Off-topic conversations

Welcome, Kelly. Feel free to speak up anytime you have a thought or a question.

 


Happy29fan wrote:

Hello everyone!

 

My name is Kelly and I live in Bellflower, California.  I love to read!  My taste in books tends to run mostly to mass market mystery/thrillers and science-fiction/fantasy; however, I am trying to broaden my horizons and read more classical books. I have the Peaver translation, but found it too bulky and heavy to read while commuting to and from work.  I am now reading the Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition translated by Briggs.  This edition is still somewhat bulky, but I have found it a little easier reading.  I'll probably be lurking more than posting.  I have been really enjoying all the insightful posts and links!


 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Everyman
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Off-topic conversations

Cascadia!!!

 

Not quite yet ready for U.N. Recognition, but just wait!


Laurel wrote: 

 

Let's see....

 

Canada

 

U.S.

 

Australia

 

U.K.

 

Any other countries represented here?



 

 

_______________
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Off-topic conversations

Getting there is beautiful if you don't meet an oversized load on the Deception Pass bridge!


Laurel wrote:
I've been to Whidby Island many times through the years. Beautiful place, and th egetting there is beautiful, too.

WildCityWoman wrote:

Do you Seattle people know anybody on Whibney Island? I think it's near there.

 

 




 

 

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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WildCityWoman
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Off-topic conversations

[ Edited ]

I've never been there, Laurel . . . I have an e-pal who lives there. I might visit her if I do go out west again . . . dunno'.

 

It's sounds like a lovely place to make a home.

 

If you've been there a few times, I guess you've taken the tour, that includes the lighthouse? Jene (my e pal) is one of the people who leads tourists around - she's small and blonde.

 


Laurel wrote:
I've been to Whidby Island many times through the years. Beautiful place, and th egetting there is beautiful, too.


WildCityWoman wrote:

Do you Seattle people know anybody on Whibney Island? I think it's near there.

 

 




 

Message Edited by WildCityWoman on 08-07-2008 11:41 PM
Carly

http://wildcity.proboards14.com/index.cgi?board=Books
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Laurel
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Off-topic conversations

Well, it's been quite a while.

 


WildCityWoman wrote:

I've never been there, Laurel . . . I have an e-pal who lives there. I might visit her if I do go out west again . . . dunno'.

 

It's sounds like a lovely place to make a home.

 

If you've been there a few times, I guess you've taken the tour, that includes the lighthouse? Jene (my e pal) is one of the people who leads tourists around - she's small and blonde.

 


Laurel wrote:
I've been to Whidby Island many times through the years. Beautiful place, and th egetting there is beautiful, too.


WildCityWoman wrote:

Do you Seattle people know anybody on Whibney Island? I think it's near there.

 

 




 

Message Edited by WildCityWoman on 08-07-2008 11:41 PM

 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Laurel
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Dessert, anyone?

[ Edited ]
How about some Charlotte Russe?
Message Edited by Laurel on 08-07-2008 08:54 PM
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Happy29fan
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Re: THE SILVER SAMOVAR--Off-topic conversations

[ Edited ]

Choisya wrote:

Commuting is heaven-sent to the avid reader isn't it?  Not only can you forget the noisy, often dirty surroundings you are in but you can get through your book list at a rate of knots!  Even though I am now retired and have plenty of time for reading, I don't think I get through as many books as I did when travelling daily on the London underground.  

 

It is interesting too to see what other commuters are reading and in London it is often an indication of what is currently on the bestsellers list or what is on the English Literature 'A' level list - I remember that Jekyll and Hyde was quite popular last year!  And when TV bring out a classic serial you see books like 'Pride & Prejudice' or 'Cranford' being read in the new editions. 

 

 

 


Peppermill wrote:

Welcome! I hope you will post, at least from time to time. As I have said only too often, sometimes the slenderest post can provide just that insight oneself has missed!

 

How brave to read this as a commuter -- public transportation, I assume. I have a very old Penguin Classics edition that must have been published in two or more parts -- I have only the first volume. It was translated by Rosemary Edmonds. It is what I am currently carrying with me when I want to read W&P on the move. I don't know what I will do when I get beyond that first volume. I read P&V's translation sitting at a table -- and I almost never read in that position -- except art books and other tomes (and a PC screen). R.E. is also a help when the P&V translation seems unclear or I just want to know how another translator approached a passage. I also found a Maude translation in a used bookstore when I was really looking for something else. It has some wonderful pictures. But, I have been known to tear apart an inexpensive copy of a book to read sections while commuting.

 

Pepper

 

Message Edited by Choisya on 08-07-2008 07:42 AM

 

So true :smileyvery-happy:!!!  You will always find me reading while commuting on the Metro Rail.  It's a great escape and makes the time go by quickly.  However, even though I am able to spend a lot of time reading I have found my little pile of "to be read" book grow to the size of a whole book case!!!  I am always curious to see what other people are reading.

 

Kelly

Message Edited by Happy29fan on 08-07-2008 09:10 PM