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bdNM
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We're near the end... What next? What should we read next?

That question -- "what next?" -- figured prominently in the mind of the Anglo-Saxons.  Their warrior's lifestyle didn't promise a particularly long life in this world, and what came next was pretty important to them, even if they could not be sure.  We have a more pressing question -- as we are coming to the end of the Beowulf discussion, what should we tackle next?  There was a request by Choisya to read Longfellow's poem, "The Song of Hiawatha."  Is there interest in that?  Is there interest in Tennyson's "Idylls of the King?"  Do we have any other suggestions? 

I would recommend that we hang on to Beowulf until the month's end, and start with our new work in April.  Still, we'll need to make that decision sometime soon.  Thanks, guys.

Dignity, always dignity.
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Redcatlady
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Re: We're near the end... What next? What should we read next?

I second your motion.

 

Redcatlady

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bdNM
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Re: We're near the end... What next? What should we read next?

What choice would you make for the next selection?

Dignity, always dignity.
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Redcatlady
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Re: We're near the end... What next? What should we read next?

 

bdNM wrote:

What choice would you make for the next selection?

 

 

Undecided at this moment.

 

Redcatlady

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Lmfwhite
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Re: We're near the end... What next? What should we read next?

I'd be interested in reading "The Song of Hiawatha"..........

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rbehr
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Re: We're near the end... What next? What should we read next?

I'd also vote for "Song of Hiawatha" starting in April. Sounds interesting.

 

I'd be interested in reading something by Dostoevsky - Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov, or The Gambler as we go through the year. 

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Permacav50
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Re: We're near the end... What next? What should we read next?

I'm about 1/2 way through Canterbury Tales right now. Been meaning to read it for ages but never really got around to it until I found a nice edition a few weeks ago. Interesting work, some of the poems are better than others but overall I'm enjoying it. I didn't check the old posts so I don't know if this has been chosen already or not but if it hasn't it's worth a nomination in my opinion. :smileyhappy:

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Peppermill
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Re: We're near the end... What next? What should we read next?

 

Permacav50 wrote:

I'm about 1/2 way through Canterbury Tales right now. Been meaning to read it for ages but never really got around to it until I found a nice edition a few weeks ago. Interesting work, some of the poems are better than others but overall I'm enjoying it. I didn't check the old posts so I don't know if this has been chosen already or not but if it hasn't it's worth a nomination in my opinion. :smileyhappy:

 

Would love to hear what edition you might recommend, Permacav!

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Permacav50
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Re: We're near the end... What next? What should we read next?

The Complete Canterbury Tales 

 

Well this is the one I read, as I noticed while searching for the link there are several variations but this is the one I came across. Oversized edition that doesn't fit well on shelves but it has some nice illustrations of some of the original manuscripts. Found it in a used bookstore in great condition and a better price. :smileyhappy:

 

It's a little tough to follow since there are a lot of different characters telling greatly varied stories but overall I enjoyed it.  

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Peppermill
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Re: We're near the end... What next? What should we read next?

 

Permacav50 wrote:

The Complete Canterbury Tales 

 

Well this is the one I read, as I noticed while searching for the link there are several variations but this is the one I came across. Oversized edition that doesn't fit well on shelves but it has some nice illustrations of some of the original manuscripts. Found it in a used bookstore in great condition and a better price. :smileyhappy:

 

It's a little tough to follow since there are a lot of different characters telling greatly varied stories but overall I enjoyed it.  

 

 

Permacav -- a belated note of thx for this post.  I still have not gone looking at all, but probably have one or two abridged versions on my shelves.

 

Was thinking this morning about Bernard's query about "what next" and realized I have few druthers for this summer.  I take a sabbatical from this board for a month or two and see if I can get through Stendhal's Red and the Black.  But I do enjoy the posts and insights here on EPICS, ETC.

 

 

Red and the Black (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

  

 

 

Both rbehr and Redcatlady have also expressed some interests:

 

rbehr:  "I'd be interested in reading something by Dostoevsky - Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov, or The Gambler as we go through the year."

Redcatlady wrote:  "I don't know how this suggestion will be received, but here goes.  Would it be possible to have two Epics sites, one for English/European poets, and the other for American?  I'd like to study Emerson, both Brownings, and T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land. ....What do you think?  Any interest out there?"  (posted early to mid-April)

 

TiggerBear commented thus on the list Bernard suggested to follow Hiawatha:  "The last three I've never heard of before. The others are all wonderful, but there are a lot of additions out. Which can be good and bad."

 

Bernard wrote (on Thursday, April 29, 2010, links are added):

 

I was thinking that we have another few weeks with Longfellow, and was wondering what people might want to read next: 


Some thoughts:

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales or Troilus and Criseyde

The Song of Roland

Mallory's Morte d'Arthur

Orlando Furioso

Jerusalem Delivered

Lucretius' De Rerum Natura ("On the Nature of Things") an epic poem about Epicurean philosophy.

 

Any thoughts on what people would like reading?  I've read Mallory and Chaucer, but none of the rest.

------------------------------

 

Armida by Gioachino Rossini, the opera, was simulcast from the Met last Saturday (May 1) and will be replayed in threatres on May 19.  It is based on Jerusalem Delivered by Torquato Tasso, published in Parma, Italy in 1581. Translation to English by Edddward Fairfax was first published in London in 1600 and is itself considered a fine work of literature.

 

Lucretius' De Rerum Natura ("On the Nature of Things") an epic poem about Epicurean philosophy -- sounds to me like a very interesting contrast/compare to current writings criticizing religion.

 

 

From the Wikipedia entry:

"Orlando Furioso ("The Frenzy of Orlando", more literally "Mad Orlando"; in Italian furioso is seldom capitalized) is an Italian romantic epic by Ludovico Ariosto which has exerted a wide influence on later culture. The earliest version appeared in 1516, although the poem was not published in its complete form until 1532. Orlando Furioso is a continuation of Matteo Maria Boiardo's unfinished romance Orlando Innamorato ("Orlando in Love", published posthumously in 1495). The action takes place against the background of the war between Charlemagne and his Christian paladins, and the Saracen army which is attempting to invade Europe. However, Ariosto has little concern for historical or geographical accuracy, and the poem wanders at will from Japan to the Hebrides, as well as including many fantastical and magical elements, such as a trip to the moon and an array of fantastical creatures including a gigantic sea monster called the orc and the hippogriff. Many themes are interwoven in its complicated, episodic structure, but the most important plot is the paladin Orlando's unrequited love for the pagan princess Angelica, which develops into the madness of the title. After this comes the love between the female Christian warrior Bradamante and the Saracen Ruggiero, who are supposed to be the ancestors of Ariosto's patrons, the d'Este family of Ferrara."

 

From the Wikipedia entry:

“The Song of Roland (French: La Chanson de Roland) is the oldest surviving major work of French literature.     ….usually dated to the middle of the twelfth century (between 1140 and 1170). The epic poem is the first and most outstanding example of the chanson de geste, a literary form that flourished between the eleventh and fifteenth centuries and celebrated the legendary deeds of a hero.”

 

“The story told in the poem is based on a historical incident, the Battle of Roncevaux Pass on August 15, 778, in which the rearguard of Charlemagne's retreating Franks, escorting a rich collection of booty gathered during a failed campaign in Spain, was attacked by Basques. In this engagement, recorded by historian and biographer Einhard (Eginhard) in his Life of Charlemagne (written around 830), the trapped soldiers were slaughtered to a man; among them was "Hruodland, Prefect of the Marches of Brittany" (Hruodlandus Brittannici limitis praefectus)."

 

Enough for now.

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy