Reply
Reader 2
ZBeanz
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎04-18-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I, as well, believe that all literature has another, more important, purpose besides entertainment and enjoyment.  The problem is that there is no way to describe that purpose because there are so many; in fact, there are an infinite amount of purposes that a novel may posess.  I feel, though, that a novel is not at all worth reading if it doesn't provide entertainment and enjoyment.  That is all that it must have.  Otherwise, nobody would care to read it.  There have been many times that I have started books that are considered to be some of the greatest and been almost unable to finish them because they didn't provide me with the entertainment aspect I was looking for.  This isn't to say that the novels don't hold higher purposes beyond what they lacked for me.  Also, this isn't to say that nobody has been able to find enjoyment out of them. 
 
Literature is, in a way, highly subjective.  If it doesn't appeal to you, then you are not going to want to read it.
However, as you stated, how much you enjoy a book depends largely on the time of your life in which you read it.  I agree with this completely and fully intend on reading both books again.  In fact, many of the books that I haven't so much enjoyed I plan on reading again.
 
Concerning the Bronte sisters, I must confess that I have not yet read Agnes Grey.  Indeed, there are many well-praised books that I haven't read.  One thing must be considered, however.  There is a certain time in life when you become able to read and appreciate literature.  I have, of course, had less time to explore the world of the classics, which I read almost exclusively.  I do have many things on my waiting list, of course.  It is impossible to get to them all soon enough!  I own copies of The Age of Innocence, a fairly new classic, if there is such a thing, The Divine Comedy, Vita Nuova, Paradise Lost, Daniel Deronda, Howard's End, and many others that have not yet been read.  Also, I have practically no knowledge of philosophical works, unless Candide can be considered mildly philosophical.  My focus has been almost entirely on British classics, hence, my obsession with Wilde. 
 
-----------------
A word to the person who commented above.  I'm sorry I don't have your name! 
In stating that I wished to be treated as an equal, I was simply trying to prevent what happened to your friend.  You are correct that everyone's opinion is equally important.  Unfortunately, when it comes to subjects based largely on personal opinion, some people can view their own opinions as being better.  You and I, most assuredly, have different opinions on several things.  The same is true regarding Everyman.  I would never disregard the importance of someone else's views on a subject simply because they were different from my own. 
-----------------
Everyman,
You said that you think the Bronte sisters are inferior to several other authors.  While I disagree with you entirely, I do respect your view on the subject.  Also, your opinion is more valid than mine, seeing as how I have read less novels of a similar nature.  Give me a few years and maybe I will agree with you!  =D
 
 
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room



Carmenere_lady wrote:
One other thing Everyman, read your post in welcome and introductions regarding your day reading on the porch. So, I make a motion that we move our cozy community room with the enormous couch outdoors for the summer and set up on your porch...................and seconds? I'll bring the mojitos!!!
Come on over! But sorry, no mojitos. We're a dry house.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Correspondent
HannibalCat
Posts: 238
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room



Everyman wrote:


Carmenere_lady wrote:
One other thing Everyman, read your post in welcome and introductions regarding your day reading on the porch. So, I make a motion that we move our cozy community room with the enormous couch outdoors for the summer and set up on your porch...................and seconds? I'll bring the mojitos!!!
Come on over! But sorry, no mojitos. We're a dry house.




How about a nice cup'a. I have some very nice Green Tea and an excellent Earl Grey. Some hot scones might be nice, too. The couch on the porch sounds grand. I can hardly wait. I just hope the birds keep their distance, I don't like their gifts that are dropped from above.

Be talking to you soon. Happy reading.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I own copies of The Age of Innocence, a fairly new classic, if there is such a thing, The Divine Comedy, Vita Nuova, Paradise Lost, Daniel Deronda, Howard's End, and many others that have not yet been read.

Move Paradise Lost up on your list. And if you can, get ahold of the audio version with Frederick Davidson reading it. It's available on tape and maybe on CD, or if you have an ipod or equivalent (are there any of your generation who don't?) you can download it from Audible.com. It's a superb reading and will enhance your enjoyment of the poem enormously.

Try to get a well annotated edition of PL -- I see that Barnes and Noble has a very affordable edition in their Classics series, which are usually (I haven't seen this particular volume) well produced and annotated. Or you can go with the Norton Critical edition, which has extensive notes and supplementary material (though the print is a bit small for older eyes like mine.)

Either way, it's a glorious read if you're ready for it, which I sense you may well be.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

[ Edited ]
Tea is definitely the drink of choice around here. (But loose leaf tea, not teaball tea. If you don't have looseleaf to bring, that's fine; I have a more than sufficient supply and selection for everybody.

But you'll have to bring our own scones. I'm no baker, and my wife is too busy with grandchildcare to be baking for a crowd!

HannibalCat wrote:


Everyman wrote:


Carmenere_lady wrote:
One other thing Everyman, read your post in welcome and introductions regarding your day reading on the porch. So, I make a motion that we move our cozy community room with the enormous couch outdoors for the summer and set up on your porch...................and seconds? I'll bring the mojitos!!!
Come on over! But sorry, no mojitos. We're a dry house.




How about a nice cup'a. I have some very nice Green Tea and an excellent Earl Grey. Some hot scones might be nice, too. The couch on the porch sounds grand. I can hardly wait. I just hope the birds keep their distance, I don't like their gifts that are dropped from above.

Be talking to you soon. Happy reading.



Message Edited by Everyman on 05-15-2008 09:57 PM
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Inspired Contributor
gosox
Posts: 69
Registered: ‎10-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Hello from the seacoast of NH.  Yahoo! I got my book today!
Frequent Contributor
FrankieD
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎12-16-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Well, my bookm arrived today...a nice surprise when I got home from a meeting in Manhattan. Now I'll check the schedule and be ready to go:smileyhappy:.
                                                                  FrankieD :smileyhappy:
" The longer I live...the more beautiful life becomes."
- Frank Lloyd Wright
Distinguished Wordsmith
Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
Registered: ‎11-05-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

[ Edited ]
O.K.  I will exchange the mojitos for the ideallic scenery.  I  make an awesome fruity tea sangria, sans the wine. Loose or nice quality bags, both work equally well in this recipe.  :smileyhappy:

Everyman wrote:
Tea is definitely the drink of choice around here. (But loose leaf tea, not teaball tea. If you don't have looseleaf to bring, that's fine; I have a more than sufficient supply and selection for everybody.

But you'll have to bring our own scones. I'm no baker, and my wife is too busy with grandchildcare to be baking for a crowd!

HannibalCat wrote:


Everyman wrote:


Carmenere_lady wrote:
One other thing Everyman, read your post in welcome and introductions regarding your day reading on the porch. So, I make a motion that we move our cozy community room with the enormous couch outdoors for the summer and set up on your porch...................and seconds? I'll bring the mojitos!!!
Come on over! But sorry, no mojitos. We're a dry house.




How about a nice cup'a. I have some very nice Green Tea and an excellent Earl Grey. Some hot scones might be nice, too. The couch on the porch sounds grand. I can hardly wait. I just hope the birds keep their distance, I don't like their gifts that are dropped from above.

Be talking to you soon. Happy reading.



Message Edited by Everyman on 05-15-2008 09:57 PM




Message Edited by Carmenere_lady on 05-16-2008 05:56 AM
Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire
Inspired Wordsmith
krb2g
Posts: 289
Registered: ‎02-05-2008
0 Kudos

Paradise Lost


Everyman wrote:
Try to get a well annotated edition of PL -- I see that Barnes and Noble has a very affordable edition in their Classics series, which are usually (I haven't seen this particular volume) well produced and annotated. Or you can go with the Norton Critical edition, which has extensive notes and supplementary material (though the print is a bit small for older eyes like mine.)


If you have a good library nearby (or are willing to drop some cash), I would also recommend Alastair Fowler's edition (available from Longman) or William Kerrigan et al.'s edition of the complete poetry and selected prose (available from Modern Library). The Norton edition (at least the edition available in the anthology, where I first read Paradise Lost) is very good as well. If you read the Norton critical edition you'll get supplementary essays, whereas the other editions I mentioned don't have that particular feature (though I suspect if you read Fowler's notes carefully, they'll be an essay unto themselves--he's opinionated).
Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,839
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

ZBeanz you rock - this is going to be one lively book review
Frequent Contributor
bookhunter
Posts: 322
Registered: ‎06-09-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Everyman wrote:
...I have found for myself, and others have said this also – that different books appeal to people at different stages of their lives and different ages. I hope that when you are forty you will go back and read both Wuthering Heights and War and Peace and see whether your respective views of them have changed. (Its’s also true, by the way, that a book read at twenty and at fifty – at least a book worth reading at both twenty and fifty – is a substantially different book.)...

 

Everyman, I just want to echo this comment.  It has been a joy and a surprise to me to go back and read some of my favorites from childhood or pre-husband, pre-kids era and see different things.  My kids are now all high school age and I share many books with my oldest (18 yo) daughter.  We "get" totally different things out of the books.  I have tried to get her to participate in these discussions.  Maybe knowing there is another teen reader will encourage her to participate.  She just finished The Sister and loved it.

My biggest surprise to myself is how impatient I am with romance story lines!  I guess I am more "practical" about my love affair these days!  (Do not interpret practical as DIMINISHED!:smileywink:  )

It has been a while since I read Wuthering Heights.  Maybe it is time to revisit that one.  Someone said they had not read it because it seems intimidating.  It is NOT!  One of the definitions of "classics" to me is that it can be enjoyed at many different depths--and they all start as a story.

Ann, bookhunter  Who received her book yesterday and loves the letter from the author!

 


Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Paradise Lost

And C.S. Lewis's A Preface to Paradise Lost is also well worth reading. Fairly short, but packed with information.

krb2g wrote:

Everyman wrote:
Try to get a well annotated edition of PL -- I see that Barnes and Noble has a very affordable edition in their Classics series, which are usually (I haven't seen this particular volume) well produced and annotated. Or you can go with the Norton Critical edition, which has extensive notes and supplementary material (though the print is a bit small for older eyes like mine.)


If you have a good library nearby (or are willing to drop some cash), I would also recommend Alastair Fowler's edition (available from Longman) or William Kerrigan et al.'s edition of the complete poetry and selected prose (available from Modern Library). The Norton edition (at least the edition available in the anthology, where I first read Paradise Lost) is very good as well. If you read the Norton critical edition you'll get supplementary essays, whereas the other editions I mentioned don't have that particular feature (though I suspect if you read Fowler's notes carefully, they'll be an essay unto themselves--he's opinionated).


_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Melissa_W
Posts: 4,123
Topics: 516
Kudos: 1,085
Blog Posts: 3
Ideas: 15
Solutions: 33
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

The BN Classics edition is pretty good, not as many supplemental essays and things as a Norton, but there are good discussion questions in the back and the annotations are done nicely.  It is also very budget friendly :smileyhappy: 

Everyman wrote:
I own copies of The Age of Innocence, a fairly new classic, if there is such a thing, The Divine Comedy, Vita Nuova, Paradise Lost, Daniel Deronda, Howard's End, and many others that have not yet been read.

Move Paradise Lost up on your list. And if you can, get ahold of the audio version with Frederick Davidson reading it. It's available on tape and maybe on CD, or if you have an ipod or equivalent (are there any of your generation who don't?) you can download it from Audible.com. It's a superb reading and will enhance your enjoyment of the poem enormously.

Try to get a well annotated edition of PL -- I see that Barnes and Noble has a very affordable edition in their Classics series, which are usually (I haven't seen this particular volume) well produced and annotated. Or you can go with the Norton Critical edition, which has extensive notes and supplementary material (though the print is a bit small for older eyes like mine.)

Either way, it's a glorious read if you're ready for it, which I sense you may well be.


Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
Inspired Contributor
Bearsstar
Posts: 47
Registered: ‎01-30-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Hi everyone, I just got my book Songs for the Missing.  I started reading it already and it's great.  I can't wait til we start the discussion about the book. 
Jeanne G aka Bearsstar
Inspired Correspondent
EbonyAngel
Posts: 276
Registered: ‎12-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Got my book.  I was out of town and it was here when I got back.
Contributor
mom2alexmegcoop
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎04-12-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I have started reading my copy, and I am really enjoying it so far. I can't wait to discuss it with all of you.
The greatest gift is a passion for reading. It is cheap, it consoles, it distracts, it excites, it gives you the knowledge of the world and experience of a wide kind. It is a moral illumination.~Elizabeth Hardwick
Correspondent
HannibalCat
Posts: 238
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I have read the first section according to the schedule. I don't dare read any more. The characters are so life-like, and the story so real, I know I won't be able to be sure I don't get into any spoilers. So I am stopping here at this point. What a great book. Great writing. I have only read Last Night at the Lobster, and I thought it was great. This is better. Happy reading, everyone.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
Registered: ‎11-05-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

 Ditto fellow readers.  Hannibal, you are much more disciplined than I.  There ain't no stopping me now for I will definitely continue on and probably finish the book well before the discussion begins, however I am taking notes to refresh my memory when we begin talking.
I thought Last Night was a great read too :smileyhappy:

HannibalCat wrote:
I have read the first section according to the schedule. I don't dare read any more. The characters are so life-like, and the story so real, I know I won't be able to be sure I don't get into any spoilers. So I am stopping here at this point. What a great book. Great writing. I have only read Last Night at the Lobster, and I thought it was great. This is better. Happy reading, everyone.


Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire
Inspired Contributor
gringorn
Posts: 49
Registered: ‎12-26-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Well, some of you out there have much more self control than I do!!  I read the entire book in two sittings and can't wait for the discussions to start in earnest.  I really enjoyed the style and how Stewart O'Nan was able to make me feel as if I had intimate insight into the character's actual thoughts during their vigil. There is no doubt I will have to get the other books he has written!
Reader
ketrn
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎12-20-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I have been at  work but came home to find my book made it.  I live in the country so everything takes longer.  I am looking forward to a day off and a large cup of tea.   Kathleen
Top Kudoed Authors
User Kudos Count
1
Users Online
Currently online:40 members 461 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: