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KxBurns
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Re: Early Chapters



detailmuse wrote:
Two lines come to mind. One is from the end of the very first paragraph: "In the fall they were gone, off to college, where [Kim] hoped, by a long and steady effort, she might become someone else, a private, independent person, someone not from Kingsville at all."  At this point in my reading, it seems that Kim will be forever public and forever attached to Kingsville.


Wow, that's a terrific insight.
 
I'm curious what you make of the choice of words here. "Independent" makes sense and seems pretty typical for someone her age. What about wanting to be "private" or to dissociate herself from Kingsville completely? What do these statements indicate about Kim or her life?
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ELee
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Re: Early Chapters



Oldesq wrote:

Some themes I picked up on:
  • many of the relationships are described in terms of contracts or deals, such as the agreement between Kim and her parents about curfew (4), Ed and Fran's "deal" (page 16), Ed and J.P about the women in their lives drinking (37-38), Fran eliciting Ed's help with Lindsay (58) and the lovemaking between J.P. and Kim (61);


Another interesting treatment is the use of "set" to describe the family.  A set is loosely defined as a group of things that are related in function or connected by similarities.
 
p. 5  "Her parents' door was closed.  So was Lindsay's.  Closing hers (Kim's) just completed the set." 
 
Hmmm, the thing they have in common is a closed door.
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KxBurns
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Re: Early Chapters



Jo6353 wrote:

Maria_H wrote:
I may be alone in this, but I was pleased that there are no scenes of utter melodrama. Of tears and sobs and shrieks and drool (you get the picture).

In general, some people steel themselves against breakdown by focusing on the task at hand.

In the story, the most important thing was to find Kim. To break down would be admitting that there is no hope and to lose control of the situation.

Besides, who's to say that they did not shed more tears than we saw? If they did, I am grateful that is was kept private. Far too many public displays of grief nowadays!

Maria,
I think that Stewart O'Nan's portrayal of this situation was done in a very clinical fashion. There was just enough emotion to make you feel involved but not so much that your heart was being ripped from your chest. I liked this approach. It propelled me through the book without terrifying me. Jo

I agree with both of your comments. I believe the emotion is there, it's just not over-the-top on display. I think this is in line with the nature of the characters, and probably a deliberate choice in the storytelling. We can all imagine what a dramatic, highly emotional response would look like because that's been portrayed countless times in popular culture ("the dingo ate my baby!" :smileyhappy: ). What is less expected from a storytelling point of view, and offers the chance for more variation, is how more introverted people, less exuberant with their emotions, would react to such circumstances.
 
And as you say, Jo, I think if the emotion were dialed up a notch it would be extremely difficult to get through the book. The distance is, in my opinion, necessary.
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vivico1
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Re: Early Chapters


KxBurns wrote:

I agree with both of your comments. I believe the emotion is there, it's just not over-the-top on display. I think this is in line with the nature of the characters, and probably a deliberate choice in the storytelling. We can all imagine what a dramatic, highly emotional response would look like because that's been portrayed countless times in popular culture ("the dingo ate my baby!" :smileyhappy: ). What is less expected from a storytelling point of view, and offers the chance for more variation, is how more introverted people, less exuberant with their emotions, would react to such circumstances.


And as you say, Jo, I think if the emotion were dialed up a notch it would be extremely difficult to get through the book. The distance is, in my opinion, necessary.




But why write a book about how people in an emotionally charged, really scary and sad situation act daily if you don't include what should be their highly charged emotions? Maybe this is the best way he could write it and as close as he could get inside them himself. I dunno. But keeping the story and us at a distance, is like telling us part of a story that altho intriguing, makes it really, just a story.

And hey! Karen! I own that "the dingo ate me baby!" movie! hehe, and what was important in that movie was their emotional reactions. It had a lot to do with why she was convicted and it was a true story. The thing about these kinds of stories, in real life, about the people around the victims, is how they react, how they feel, their emotions, are they real, are they faked. How many times have people become the major suspect in real life because of how little they reacted? If that's really the case, I would suspect everyone in this book! And so far here in the early chapters, I am surprised to see, that none of the characters are really a suspect of any kind really. I mean they get questioned some but we don't even get to hear that so that we can build our own "feelings" about it and see if we are right or not too. Everyone just seems to be doing something but with little emotion. Speaking in movie terms then, is this Stepford??? HEY, maybe thats it! Kim has been abducted to become a stepford teen! Everyone in town just goes through the "appropriate" motions. Ok, so that's a bit much lol :smileywink: but come to think of it,thats about the feeling I get from them all. Now see what you started with that Dingo comment? ROFL :smileywink:
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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detailmuse
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Re: Early Chapters

I guessed that she wanted to be an individual of her own creation, not the daughter/sister she's defined as in her small town.
 
The phrase, "by a long and steady effort," sticks out to me -- it's not necessary to the main thought of the sentence, so its inclusion feels intentional. Wouldn't most girls her age think that they could create their new identity instantly -- on Day 1 of college?

KxBurns wrote:


detailmuse wrote:
Two lines come to mind. One is from the end of the very first paragraph: "In the fall they were gone, off to college, where [Kim] hoped, by a long and steady effort, she might become someone else, a private, independent person, someone not from Kingsville at all."  At this point in my reading, it seems that Kim will be forever public and forever attached to Kingsville.


I'm curious what you make of the choice of words here. "Independent" makes sense and seems pretty typical for someone her age. What about wanting to be "private" or to dissociate herself from Kingsville completely? What do these statements indicate about Kim or her life?


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KxBurns
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Re: Early Chapters



vivico1 wrote:

KxBurns wrote:

I agree with both of your comments. I believe the emotion is there, it's just not over-the-top on display. I think this is in line with the nature of the characters, and probably a deliberate choice in the storytelling. We can all imagine what a dramatic, highly emotional response would look like because that's been portrayed countless times in popular culture ("the dingo ate my baby!" :smileyhappy: ). What is less expected from a storytelling point of view, and offers the chance for more variation, is how more introverted people, less exuberant with their emotions, would react to such circumstances.


And as you say, Jo, I think if the emotion were dialed up a notch it would be extremely difficult to get through the book. The distance is, in my opinion, necessary.




But why write a book about how people in an emotionally charged, really scary and sad situation act daily if you don't include what should be their highly charged emotions? Maybe this is the best way he could write it and as close as he could get inside them himself. I dunno. But keeping the story and us at a distance, is like telling us part of a story that altho intriguing, makes it really, just a story.

And hey! Karen! I own that "the dingo ate me baby!" movie! hehe, and what was important in that movie was their emotional reactions. It had a lot to do with why she was convicted and it was a true story. The thing about these kinds of stories, in real life, about the people around the victims, is how they react, how they feel, their emotions, are they real, are they faked. How many times have people become the major suspect in real life because of how little they reacted? If that's really the case, I would suspect everyone in this book! And so far here in the early chapters, I am surprised to see, that none of the characters are really a suspect of any kind really. I mean they get questioned some but we don't even get to hear that so that we can build our own "feelings" about it and see if we are right or not too. Everyone just seems to be doing something but with little emotion. Speaking in movie terms then, is this Stepford??? HEY, maybe thats it! Kim has been abducted to become a stepford teen! Everyone in town just goes through the "appropriate" motions. Ok, so that's a bit much lol :smileywink: but come to think of it,thats about the feeling I get from them all. Now see what you started with that Dingo comment? ROFL :smileywink:

I guess I just don't believe there are particular emotions or ways of displaying them that should be. There is just what is. The characters feel the way they feel; they express it or hide it as best they can; and we the readers feel about that as we will. Which includes disagreeing :smileyhappy:
 
And this disagreement over whether they're acting appropriately or not might be what O'Nan is going for. It puts us in the position of the members of the community in a way, although we get a more intimate look at the lives of the family members than they do. But it gives us the opportunity to judge the family's reaction -- if we choose to do so -- and then ask ourselves why we come to the conclusions we do.
 
Actually, this is fascinating because it happens all the time in real life, when we watch a case like this play out in the media. Think how often the public judges a person's innocence or guilt based soley on how sad or distraught (or not) they appear in the media. Would we prefer them to manufacture emotion or displays of emotion in order to mirror how we think they should appear? It's an interesting dilemma.
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carol08
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Re: Early Chapters

I really liked how O'Nan moved from one point of view to another with each point of view normally filling a chapter. Other authors have used hints like naming the chapters for the character or using a different font for each character. O'Nan's technique of just letting the reader read a few words, sentences, or occasionally a few paragraphs to know who's telling the story in a particular chapter is a much superior way!

And I thought he does a great job of capturing each character's voice, feelings, and actions. In a later chapter, Fran's Christmas shopping was spot on.
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vivico1
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Re: Early Chapters


KxBurns wrote:







vivico1 wrote:




KxBurns wrote:




But why write a book about how people in an emotionally charged, really scary and sad situation act daily if you don't include what should be their highly charged emotions? Maybe this is the best way he could write it and as close as he could get inside them himself. I dunno. But keeping the story and us at a distance, is like telling us part of a story that altho intriguing, makes it really, just a story.

And hey! Karen! I own that "the dingo ate me baby!" movie! hehe, and what was important in that movie was their emotional reactions. It had a lot to do with why she was convicted and it was a true story. The thing about these kinds of stories, in real life, about the people around the victims, is how they react, how they feel, their emotions, are they real, are they faked. How many times have people become the major suspect in real life because of how little they reacted? If that's really the case, I would suspect everyone in this book! And so far here in the early chapters, I am surprised to see, that none of the characters are really a suspect of any kind really. I mean they get questioned some but we don't even get to hear that so that we can build our own "feelings" about it and see if we are right or not too. Everyone just seems to be doing something but with little emotion. Speaking in movie terms then, is this Stepford??? HEY, maybe thats it! Kim has been abducted to become a stepford teen! Everyone in town just goes through the "appropriate" motions. Ok, so that's a bit much lol :smileywink: but come to think of it,thats about the feeling I get from them all. Now see what you started with that Dingo comment? ROFL :smileywink:




I guess I just don't believe there are particular emotions or ways of displaying them that should be. There is just what is. The characters feel the way they feel; they express it or hide it as best they can; and we the readers feel about that as we will. Which includes disagreeing :smileyhappy:


And this disagreement over whether they're acting appropriately or not might be what O'Nan is going for. It puts us in the position of the members of the community in a way, although we get a more intimate look at the lives of the family members than they do. But it gives us the opportunity to judge the family's reaction -- if we choose to do so -- and then ask ourselves why we come to the conclusions we do.


Actually, this is fascinating because it happens all the time in real life, when we watch a case like this play out in the media. Think how often the public judges a person's innocence or guilt based soley on how sad or distraught (or not) they appear in the media. Would we prefer them to manufacture emotion or displays of emotion in order to mirror how we think they should appear? It's an interesting dilemma.



No, see, the thing is, I am not saying they are behaving or not behaving as they should. I am not judging the characters, or their responses, I want to be clear on that, because I would not judge them (I would hope) in real life. What I am saying is, that O'Nan is not great at telling us what they are feeling when he is writing in the 3rd person omniscient and knows what that would be. I am not judging the characters, but the writing style that leaves us flat about a group of people that should be rich in material to write about emotionally. He is not letting us inside enough to really feel for them as we could. When I talk about how little everyone reacts, I am talking about how little the author is showing us, and to me,that is leaving out a really rich resource to tap into for this kind of book. That's what makes the characters frustrating to me, not what Fran does, or Ed, or whoever, but that it just sounds like journaling from a third person so far.
If O'Nan would write more of this, explore more of this, then I would agree with you that... "And this disagreement over whether they're acting appropriately or not might be what O'Nan is going for. .... and then ask ourselves why we come to the conclusions we do."
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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abbyg7
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Re: Early Chapters



vivico1 wrote:

KxBurns wrote:







vivico1 wrote:




KxBurns wrote:




But why write a book about how people in an emotionally charged, really scary and sad situation act daily if you don't include what should be their highly charged emotions? Maybe this is the best way he could write it and as close as he could get inside them himself. I dunno. But keeping the story and us at a distance, is like telling us part of a story that altho intriguing, makes it really, just a story.

And hey! Karen! I own that "the dingo ate me baby!" movie! hehe, and what was important in that movie was their emotional reactions. It had a lot to do with why she was convicted and it was a true story. The thing about these kinds of stories, in real life, about the people around the victims, is how they react, how they feel, their emotions, are they real, are they faked. How many times have people become the major suspect in real life because of how little they reacted? If that's really the case, I would suspect everyone in this book! And so far here in the early chapters, I am surprised to see, that none of the characters are really a suspect of any kind really. I mean they get questioned some but we don't even get to hear that so that we can build our own "feelings" about it and see if we are right or not too. Everyone just seems to be doing something but with little emotion. Speaking in movie terms then, is this Stepford??? HEY, maybe thats it! Kim has been abducted to become a stepford teen! Everyone in town just goes through the "appropriate" motions. Ok, so that's a bit much lol :smileywink: but come to think of it,thats about the feeling I get from them all. Now see what you started with that Dingo comment? ROFL :smileywink:




I guess I just don't believe there are particular emotions or ways of displaying them that should be. There is just what is. The characters feel the way they feel; they express it or hide it as best they can; and we the readers feel about that as we will. Which includes disagreeing :smileyhappy:


And this disagreement over whether they're acting appropriately or not might be what O'Nan is going for. It puts us in the position of the members of the community in a way, although we get a more intimate look at the lives of the family members than they do. But it gives us the opportunity to judge the family's reaction -- if we choose to do so -- and then ask ourselves why we come to the conclusions we do.


Actually, this is fascinating because it happens all the time in real life, when we watch a case like this play out in the media. Think how often the public judges a person's innocence or guilt based soley on how sad or distraught (or not) they appear in the media. Would we prefer them to manufacture emotion or displays of emotion in order to mirror how we think they should appear? It's an interesting dilemma.



No, see, the thing is, I am not saying they are behaving or not behaving as they should. I am not judging the characters, or their responses, I want to be clear on that, because I would not judge them (I would hope) in real life. What I am saying is, that O'Nan is not great at telling us what they are feeling when he is writing in the 3rd person omniscient and knows what that would be. I am not judging the characters, but the writing style that leaves us flat about a group of people that should be rich in material to write about emotionally. He is not letting us inside enough to really feel for them as we could. When I talk about how little everyone reacts, I am talking about how little the author is showing us, and to me,that is leaving out a really rich resource to tap into for this kind of book. That's what makes the characters frustrating to me, not what Fran does, or Ed, or whoever, but that it just sounds like journaling from a third person so far.
If O'Nan would write more of this, explore more of this, then I would agree with you that... "And this disagreement over whether they're acting appropriately or not might be what O'Nan is going for. .... and then ask ourselves why we come to the conclusions we do."

The fact that O'Nan does not tell us exactly what the characters are feeling is what I liked about the book.  I think that if he did start to write very emotionally the book would become too much like every other book or TV show involving a missing person.  This is one of the things people were complaining about before the discussion started--the book was too much like every other thing they had read.  I do not agree with this at all.  I think the book was unique just because it did not get overly emotional, it told the story in a way that I feel many people from a more conservative small mid-west town would behave.  Being from such a town myself, I feel that many of us are taught not to display all our emotions in public, some things are just for behind closed doors.  Not that that is always the right way to be and not that we don't have our share of "drama queens".   I just feel like many of us are more private, sometimes not even sharing very personal things with friends.
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vivico1
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Re: Early Chapters


abbyg7 wrote:


The fact that O'Nan does not tell us exactly what the characters are feeling is what I liked about the book. I think that if he did start to write very emotionally the book would become too much like every other book or TV show involving a missing person. This is one of the things people were complaining about before the discussion started--the book was too much like every other thing they had read. I do not agree with this at all. I think the book was unique just because it did not get overly emotional, it told the story in a way that I feel many people from a more conservative small mid-west town would behave. Being from such a town myself, I feel that many of us are taught not to display all our emotions in public, some things are just for behind closed doors. Not that that is always the right way to be and not that we don't have our share of "drama queens". I just feel like many of us are more private, sometimes not even sharing very personal things with friends.



I really am not talking about overly emotional, as it must seem I am saying. I am saying emotionally at all. This writing is like a news report of whats going on. And I live in a small town too, one traffic light lol. Anyway, I will shut up now, till we get further on in the book. :smileywink:
Vivian
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KxBurns
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Re: Early Chapters



vivico1 wrote:

abbyg7 wrote:


The fact that O'Nan does not tell us exactly what the characters are feeling is what I liked about the book. I think that if he did start to write very emotionally the book would become too much like every other book or TV show involving a missing person. This is one of the things people were complaining about before the discussion started--the book was too much like every other thing they had read. I do not agree with this at all. I think the book was unique just because it did not get overly emotional, it told the story in a way that I feel many people from a more conservative small mid-west town would behave. Being from such a town myself, I feel that many of us are taught not to display all our emotions in public, some things are just for behind closed doors. Not that that is always the right way to be and not that we don't have our share of "drama queens". I just feel like many of us are more private, sometimes not even sharing very personal things with friends.



I really am not talking about overly emotional, as it must seem I am saying. I am saying emotionally at all. This writing is like a news report of whats going on. And I live in a small town too, one traffic light lol. Anyway, I will shut up now, till we get further on in the book. :smileywink:

Oh, I see -- it's more the writing style you're struggling with/not liking. Fair enough! I do think we've stumbled upon a great question, about the public expectations we may impose on families in this situation. I've posed the question over on The Search thread but the whole book is fair game on that thread so those of you who are reading incrementally should feel free to continue discussing it here!
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PattyJean
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Re: Early Chapters



Everyman wrote:
At the same time, the police reaction was perfectly understandable. Most times when a teen aged girl from (as someone noted above) a mildly dysfunctional family giving inadequate attention to the daughter goes missing, it's because she has chosen to go off somewhere with a guy or to a big city or for some other reason of her own volition. it's perfectly reasonable for the police not to assume the worst right away.

And also, given the record of dysfunctional families, it's also entirely appropriate for them to wonder whether one or both of the parents had something to do with it.

I find the description of the official response to be very believable.

crimefighter4444 wrote:
i think the nonchalant attitude of the police and the anguish it caused was the setting for the entire path of the story. the author set this trend brilliantly.







yes!...at the end of chapter 1 I found myself wondering...missing because she was taken or missing because she was left?
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PattyJean
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Re: Early Chapters



kiakar wrote:


Everyman wrote:
At the same time, the police reaction was perfectly understandable. Most times when a teen aged girl from (as someone noted above) a mildly dysfunctional family giving inadequate attention to the daughter goes missing, it's because she has chosen to go off somewhere with a guy or to a big city or for some other reason of her own volition. it's perfectly reasonable for the police not to assume the worst right away.

And also, given the record of dysfunctional families, it's also entirely appropriate for them to wonder whether one or both of the parents had something to do with it.

I find the description of the official response to be very believable.

crimefighter4444 wrote:
i think the nonchalant attitude of the police and the anguish it caused was the setting for the entire path of the story. the author set this trend brilliantly.





I can't see that this family was dysfunctional. Maybe things have changed in families over the many years I raised my daughters but I do not think I would call this family dysfunctional at all. They loved together, played together. Times do change and the changes in this story was typical of working mom and working dad and children driving and so forth that can easily go wrong in a child's life but Dysfunctional NO,I will have to disagree.





Not major dysfunction....but the allusions to Fran's drinking, Lindsay's isolationism, Ed's determination for Lindsay to follow Kim's athletic footsteps though she was not athletic... I don't think they are candidates for family counseling, but think there were quirks that were not necessarily th enorm.
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PattyJean
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Re: Early Chapters



detailmuse wrote:
I guessed that she wanted to be an individual of her own creation, not the daughter/sister she's defined as in her small town.
The phrase, "by a long and steady effort," sticks out to me -- it's not necessary to the main thought of the sentence, so its inclusion feels intentional. Wouldn't most girls her age think that they could create their new identity instantly -- on Day 1 of college?

KxBurns wrote:


detailmuse wrote:
Two lines come to mind. One is from the end of the very first paragraph: "In the fall they were gone, off to college, where [Kim] hoped, by a long and steady effort, she might become someone else, a private, independent person, someone not from Kingsville at all." At this point in my reading, it seems that Kim will be forever public and forever attached to Kingsville.


I'm curious what you make of the choice of words here. "Independent" makes sense and seems pretty typical for someone her age. What about wanting to be "private" or to dissociate herself from Kingsville completely? What do these statements indicate about Kim or her life?






Tbose are words, "by a long and steady effort.....someone not from Kingsville at all" that made me wonder if she had simply "gone missing" on her own.
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pjpick
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Re: Early Chapters

First I have to apologize. I've had out of town company and have only been able to read sporadically so my recollections may be fractured a bit. I'm no where near finishing the book.
 
From reading the other posts I'm a wee bit embarrassed. The DQ scene had almost no impact on me. I've been struggling to recall it. It seems it was just painting an everyday picture for me, sort of setting up a backdrop--a basic page out of everyday life. I'll have to go back and reread it.
 
I've noticed other posters comments about the police's "lack of interest" or "non-chalance" regarding Kim's disappearance. My interpretation is rather different. I see their response as more of a professional distance. I've noticed in my own profession if my emotions take hold of me I'm unable to perform my job as well--that's not to say that I don't experience emotions during my job I just can't let them take over or my job is deeply hampered. I'm assuming the police operate in a similar manner. I would also suspect a small town has very limited resources--I can't recall if the population was mentioned in the book but I lived in a town of 5000 that only had 6 officers.
 
Oddly enough one of the scenes that struck me as meaningful was the search scene. I wondered, are searches performed to help the police or to help the community to become involved to help their fellow community member or just "stay busy with a purpose" type of thing? I don't know. It seemed in this story it was the latter. It was giving the community and family a purpose during the early stages. Fran's friend got the information of a web site on the internet regarding the search and as I recall it was not from any type of law enforcement site. Am I correct? Is there anyone out there involved in police work that might shed some light on this?  It seems to me searches are mainly performed to find a body. (Again, I might be wrong).
 
Another poster brought up concern for the younger sister, Lindsey. Her character is really keeping me interested in the story. As someone whose sibling went through a near fatal tragedy I know the other sibling can be exposed to several things from the parents: mine swung between extreme overprotectiveness, frequent comparisons to my brother,  the "you should be acting or doing such and such" statements, and just all out neglect.  (As and adult I can totally understand their behavior, but at the time it really put me through the ringer emotionally, along with the fear of losing a sibling.) 
 
I'm not bothered by the family's lack of showing emotion at this stage. They appear to be in a state of shock. People also exhibit their emotions in different ways and it has been my experience the more stoic the person the more they fear of losing control--if they lose it they'll never be able to get it back.
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NYBri
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Re: Early Chapters

I like the Americana description of life in a small town. He really captures the American experience - along with "oh, a kidnapping" - a day in the life of middle America. So what else happened today?
The experience of working at the gas station, swimming at the water hole, hanging out with friends and younger sister set the tableau - like a Miss Maple mystery - everything within reach with well defined borders - a microcosm without the complex distractions of a more integrated urban setting.
- Brian
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bunny21
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Re: Early Chapters

I didnt think Kim didnt have much of a home life. Her mother and her argued alll the time. Fran was relieved that kim was leaving for college.During her police interview Fran actaully had thoughts towards "No one had ever made her unhappier, or more unsure of herself.hateful.helpless." Also the fact that Fran was never home the sametimeKim was, but always tried to enforce rules on Kim. Parents need to involved in their childrens lives in order to gain their resepct. If Fran had been more loving and made a point to spend time with Kim maybe they wouldnt have fought as much and Fran wouldnt have had so much anger and hate towards Kim. Her Father seemed like the type of guy who was just living day to day and trying to deal with living with Fran. He tried to give Kim so freedoms but didnt want to fight Fran on it. Ed waited p for Kim until graduation, which was probably to show her that he knows she is an adult and can take care of herslef, but left lights on to let her know he still cares. Lindsay was in Kims shadow. She wasnt as good at sports and wasnt as pretty as Kim, but knew she was smarter then Kim. there was jealousy and resentment towards Kim and a need to go to a better college then Kim and Kims friends. Normal sibling competition.
 
 
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sile
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Re: Early Chapters



petitefleur wrote:
It is so sad to watch as Kim's parents begin the search for one daughter and don't realize how distant they are from the other.  I find myself feeling so sorry for Lindsay, the awkward kid that feels she can never measure up to her big sister.  Little does she know that Kim secretly envies her.  I think the time they spent together the day before Kim's disappearance helped them to feel closer to one another.  However, as the parents work together to find Kim they think they are sort of leaving Lindsay behind.  Communication is not a strength in this family.


Message Edited by petitefleur on 06-03-2008 12:07 AM

I agree with you about how Lindsay is kind of getting lost in the shuffle of things.  Hopefully the search for Kim will also allow the parents to "find" Lindsay too.
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sile
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎04-10-2008
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Re: Early Chapters







The interesting thing here is that the police did take Kim's disappearance very seriously. They deposed the family and then friends to make certain no one was hiding information on her whereabouts. They were instrumental in organizing the search parties and liaisoning with those involved in the search. Where O'Nan strikes gold is in his portrayal of two anguished parents for whom the police's efforts will never be enough until their daughter is returned to them. The police's actions (search dogs are pointless unless you know where to pick up Kim's scent) are eminently reasonable, but of course they would not seem that way to a grieving, terrified, and frustrated parent.

I think from the paren't perspective the police response wasn't enough.  I keep thinking how would the police role be different if she were 8 instead of 18.  I think that is the search the parents want, but for a missing adult I think the police were doing their job (at least as far as I have read :smileyhappy: )
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CathyB
Posts: 271
Registered: ‎12-30-2006
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Re: Early Chapters



vivico1 wrote:



I really am not talking about overly emotional, as it must seem I am saying. I am saying emotionally at all. This writing is like a news report of whats going on. And I live in a small town too, one traffic light lol. Anyway, I will shut up now, till we get further on in the book. :smileywink:


Well said vivico1.  This is the same feeling I got - like it was just another news story - been there,
done that.  The style of writing of the characters didn't allow me to 'invest' in the characters (story).
 
CathyB
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