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KxBurns
Posts: 1,006
Registered: ‎09-06-2007
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Re: Kim



va-BBoomer wrote:
When someone dies prematurely, the survivors - friends, family - often idealize the deceased.  I think her parents definitely did this with Kim, especially after she was declared officially missing, and as time progressed, and everyone had to admit that she was probably dead.  I think the reason Ed and Fran became hostile toward Nina and JP was their revelation that Kim was a normal teen-ager who had done some drugs, and had sex.  This broke into this emotionally-protective idealization of her that her parents had developed.
I don't see this from Lindsay at all aside from her always remembering their final day together.  As her parents said at the time they gave her permission to get a job and move along with life, she was easier and more mature than Kim had been at a similar age.
Her friends were the ones who continued to know and accept and not forget the real Kim that they knew.


This is especially true of Fran. I was really struck by Fran's photo collages in the final chapter, plastering the walls of the home and the computer slideshow with images of Kim, almost to the point where it felt like Kim was a guest at her own funeral. But not the real Kim; the photographed version. When Lindsay retreats to bed, Fran "...thanked her and kissed her cheek, then sat back on the couch, surrounded by Kim" (p. 286). I thought that was really poignant and sad.
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chickletta
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎04-10-2008
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Re: Kim

Kim is quite real when we see her in flesh and blood but becomes less real as time goes by. This in spite of the fact that we learn more and more about her drinking, drugs, sex, while her parents are busy blowing up pictures of her for the search, and later memorial service and so on. I got the feeling that if we'd been allowed into Wooze's house and maybe read some of his perspective, we might have understood Kim a lot better. To me it was telling that at her gravesite, her friends left beer and Wooze left a Kitkat. Like a poster said, that kinda shows who knows her best.
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HannibalCat
Posts: 238
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
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Re: Kim



chickletta wrote:
Kim is quite real when we see her in flesh and blood but becomes less real as time goes by. This in spite of the fact that we learn more and more about her drinking, drugs, sex, while her parents are busy blowing up pictures of her for the search, and later memorial service and so on. I got the feeling that if we'd been allowed into Wooze's house and maybe read some of his perspective, we might have understood Kim a lot better. To me it was telling that at her gravesite, her friends left beer and Wooze left a Kitkat. Like a poster said, that kinda shows who knows her best.





I felt that way, too. But I realized it was because at the beginning, I was developing the image of a real person, flesh and blood, with her intimacies and feelings intact. Then, as I saw her through the eyes of her friends, and saw all the different views of her, she became less solid to me. I found I was then trying to piece together a person from everyone else's viewpoints. That's when she became a ghost, ephemeral. She lost her solidity. She was everyone else's Kim, not mine.
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KxBurns
Posts: 1,006
Registered: ‎09-06-2007
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Re: Kim



HannibalCat wrote:


chickletta wrote:
Kim is quite real when we see her in flesh and blood but becomes less real as time goes by. This in spite of the fact that we learn more and more about her drinking, drugs, sex, while her parents are busy blowing up pictures of her for the search, and later memorial service and so on. I got the feeling that if we'd been allowed into Wooze's house and maybe read some of his perspective, we might have understood Kim a lot better. To me it was telling that at her gravesite, her friends left beer and Wooze left a Kitkat. Like a poster said, that kinda shows who knows her best.




I felt that way, too. But I realized it was because at the beginning, I was developing the image of a real person, flesh and blood, with her intimacies and feelings intact. Then, as I saw her through the eyes of her friends, and saw all the different views of her, she became less solid to me. I found I was then trying to piece together a person from everyone else's viewpoints. That's when she became a ghost, ephemeral. She lost her solidity. She was everyone else's Kim, not mine.

One thing I admired about the writing of Kim was how, even though we develop a disjointed image of Kim as we try to reconcile the differing depictions offered by her family and friends, there still appeared to be an essential truth to each "version" of Kim that was presented. I didn't feel like some characters were completely deceived about her while others had known the more authentic Kim.
 
So as the idealized Kim was developing in the minds and memories of Fran and Ed, a fairly cohesive impression of the "real" Kim was taking shape in my own mind from the fragments revealed by her various loved ones. To be sure, some mystery remains, but that seems to be the point.
 
Does anyone agree/disagree?...
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Kim



KxBurns wrote: One thing I admired about the writing of Kim was how, even though we develop a disjointed image of Kim as we try to reconcile the differing depictions offered by her family and friends, there still appeared to be an essential truth to each "version" of Kim that was presented. I didn't feel like some characters were completely deceived about her while others had known the more authentic Kim.

So as the idealized Kim was developing in the minds and memories of Fran and Ed, a fairly cohesive impression of the "real" Kim was taking shape in my own mind from the fragments revealed by her various loved ones. To be sure, some mystery remains, but that seems to be the point.

Does anyone agree/disagree?...



Thanks for those comments, Karen. I quite agree, and I wouldn't have said them so profoundly -- my comment would be that the picture that developed of Kim is believable. My one other comment would be that we don't get many clues as to what led Kim to do some of the things she did, some of which might have been helpful in understanding the family dynamics, especially Fran.

Thanks, too, Karen, for all the time and thought and effort you have put into structuring and guiding this discussion. Truly a bravo job.
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