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vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for the Editor


ELee wrote:


trkmantis wrote:
I am a poor choice for a reader of this type of book.
I have two daughters in their early twenties and have been terrified since they were born of their being kidnapped, sold into white slave trade, raped and murdered- -sequentially.
My opinions are strong, but only my own. This is very well written and emotionally true. But-- I would never buy this work. It is a book best sold to those without female children in their lives, emotionally unchallenged in their family lives and secure in their optimism.
If my criticism seems harsh, you might bear in mind that many people never entertain such a possibility. They have cheerful outlooks, "It couldn't really happen to my daughter- It's only a story." I am constantly aware that it could. The problem I see with this book is that it offers no help, just insight into helplessness. But then, there is no solution, just endurance of fear or if horribly necessary, reality.
P.S. I love murder mysteries--Go Figure!


I think you reaction is an excellent testament to the effectiveness of O'Nan's work. As with countless authors down through time who "point fingers" at things that need our attention, his job was not to offer solutions but to make even "those without female children in their lives, emotionally unchallenged in their family lives and secure in their optimism" experience what it might be like to live through this situation. And yes, there is the endurance of fear and reality, but if awareness can subtract from the problem or even add to the solution, so much the better!



Excuse me???

My opinions are strong, but only my own. This is very well written and emotionally true. But-- I would never buy this work. It is a book best sold to those without female children in their lives, emotionally unchallenged in their family lives and secure in their optimism.

You don't have to have female children to worry about those you love. You think all those things you mentioned don't happen to boys? Or that to not have little girls makes you emotionally unchallenged in a family life? I think anyone who really loves anyone, even if not a child at all, can worry for their safety and be very much emotionally invested in their loved ones and family. You want to talk about emotionally challenged? I have a panic disorder, I "what if" everything, even about me! But at the same time I know that to be "terrified" since a child was born of losing them in such a way, can suck the life out of you and in turn them. A parent's fears can stifle a child's exploration and wonder of the world. If this has truly terrified you since they were born, I feel bad for you, it must be as debilitating as my panic disorder can be. But feeling sympathy for what that must be like for you does not mean saying someone like me with no female child, is an emotionally unchallenged person! And to say that is living secure in their optimism makes it sound like not living in reality. You can live in reality very optimistically. That doesn't mean bad things won't happen, it just means you dont hide away from life afraid, waiting for them to.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for the Editor



vivico1 wrote:

ELee wrote:


trkmantis wrote:
I am a poor choice for a reader of this type of book.
I have two daughters in their early twenties and have been terrified since they were born of their being kidnapped, sold into white slave trade, raped and murdered- -sequentially.
My opinions are strong, but only my own. This is very well written and emotionally true. But-- I would never buy this work. It is a book best sold to those without female children in their lives, emotionally unchallenged in their family lives and secure in their optimism.
If my criticism seems harsh, you might bear in mind that many people never entertain such a possibility. They have cheerful outlooks, "It couldn't really happen to my daughter- It's only a story." I am constantly aware that it could. The problem I see with this book is that it offers no help, just insight into helplessness. But then, there is no solution, just endurance of fear or if horribly necessary, reality.
P.S. I love murder mysteries--Go Figure!


I think you reaction is an excellent testament to the effectiveness of O'Nan's work. As with countless authors down through time who "point fingers" at things that need our attention, his job was not to offer solutions but to make even "those without female children in their lives, emotionally unchallenged in their family lives and secure in their optimism" experience what it might be like to live through this situation. And yes, there is the endurance of fear and reality, but if awareness can subtract from the problem or even add to the solution, so much the better!



Excuse me???

My opinions are strong, but only my own. This is very well written and emotionally true. But-- I would never buy this work. It is a book best sold to those without female children in their lives, emotionally unchallenged in their family lives and secure in their optimism.

You don't have to have female children to worry about those you love. You think all those things you mentioned don't happen to boys? Or that to not have little girls makes you emotionally unchallenged in a family life? I think anyone who really loves anyone, even if not a child at all, can worry for their safety and be very much emotionally invested in their loved ones and family. You want to talk about emotionally challenged? I have a panic disorder, I "what if" everything, even about me! But at the same time I know that to be "terrified" since a child was born of losing them in such a way, can suck the life out of you and in turn them. A parent's fears can stifle a child's exploration and wonder of the world. If this has truly terrified you since they were born, I feel bad for you, it must be as debilitating as my panic disorder can be. But feeling sympathy for what that must be like for you does not mean saying someone like me with no female child, is an emotionally unchallenged person! And to say that is living secure in their optimism makes it sound like not living in reality. You can live in reality very optimistically. That doesn't mean bad things won't happen, it just means you dont hide away from life afraid, waiting for them to.


I was always on my p's and q's in trying to protect my girls. But Vivian is right, horrible things happen to young boys. as well as girls.  All children are at risk for assault and kidnapping because of their innocence. At a young age or at teenagers. I let mine live their life as normal but I was always drilling in their heads about strangers and never go anywhere along and all that. You do the same when they are driving, all you can do is instruct over and over again. And I had alot of faith in God, in a way if you  allow your child to live like a child should live, especially this day and time, you have to trust God for help.
Contributor
WhiteHouseQuartet
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎04-11-2008
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Re: Questions for the Editor

Something to think about...when discussing Kim's clothes, it is said that her mom could have purchased several shirts for the price of one from Old Navy.  This doesn't ring true and may need to be reconsidered...Old Navy is actually a very inexpensive place to purchase T-shirts.  Perhaps using Abercrombie & Finch in the place of Old Navy would bring a realism and truth to this section.  It's a small detail, but it stood out and was a bit of a distraction to me.
 
Overall, the book was a fantastic tension-filled read.  It grabbed me from the beginning and the story always seemed on the verge of breaking...perfect pacing.
 
Steph
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for the Editor



WhiteHouseQuartet wrote:
Something to think about...when discussing Kim's clothes, it is said that her mom could have purchased several shirts for the price of one from Old Navy.  This doesn't ring true and may need to be reconsidered...Old Navy is actually a very inexpensive place to purchase T-shirts.  Perhaps using Abercrombie & Finch in the place of Old Navy would bring a realism and truth to this section.  It's a small detail, but it stood out and was a bit of a distraction to me.
 
Overall, the book was a fantastic tension-filled read.  It grabbed me from the beginning and the story always seemed on the verge of breaking...perfect pacing.
 
Steph


Hey Steph:   Maybe it depends where you are , that is georgraphical location. I live in central Va. and there is a big difference in Old Navy and say Wal Mart and most of the time they are cheaper in Targets. Of course it will depend on the type of tshirt and the material. But my granddaughter likes Old navy, that is why I know they are more expensive than say wally or Targets.
Correspondent
detailmuse
Posts: 180
Registered: ‎01-24-2008
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Re: Questions for the Editor

I assumed she was deciding between Univ of Mich and Northwestern. From p266: "Over spring break they took Lindsay on a tour of the nearby colleges on her shortlist, stopping in Ann Arbor and Chicago, [...] Lindsay liked Northwestern..." The final chapter makes it clear she's in Chicago.

va-BBoomer wrote:
I am pleased with the book as a whole, and only found one possible 'problem' that is probably nit-picking: when Lindsay goes college-hunting, it is mentioned that she is basically choosing between Northwestern and UChicago.  When she is in college, nothing is mentioned as to what school she decided on.  One can pick up a hint, but only that.  Unless I missed something, I did not see any specific mention of where she ended up.
 



Author
Stewart_ONan
Posts: 119
Registered: ‎05-20-2008
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Re: Questions for the Editor



kiakar wrote:


WhiteHouseQuartet wrote:
Something to think about...when discussing Kim's clothes, it is said that her mom could have purchased several shirts for the price of one from Old Navy.  This doesn't ring true and may need to be reconsidered...Old Navy is actually a very inexpensive place to purchase T-shirts.  Perhaps using Abercrombie & Finch in the place of Old Navy would bring a realism and truth to this section.  It's a small detail, but it stood out and was a bit of a distraction to me.
 
Overall, the book was a fantastic tension-filled read.  It grabbed me from the beginning and the story always seemed on the verge of breaking...perfect pacing.
 
Steph


Hey Steph:   Maybe it depends where you are , that is georgraphical location. I live in central Va. and there is a big difference in Old Navy and say Wal Mart and most of the time they are cheaper in Targets. Of course it will depend on the type of tshirt and the material. But my granddaughter likes Old navy, that is why I know they are more expensive than say wally or Targets.


It's a willful overstatement by Fran (and evidence that she doesn't understand (or doesn't honor) the teenaged need for fashion over practicality), comparing a brand name t-shirt to a cheap three-pack at WallyWorld.


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