Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Contributor
kdenisse86
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital



Librarian wrote:

goingeast wrote:
I thought the Major didn't have any children but we haven't found out why yet. I don't know if I'm the only one who thinks this but The Game sounds rather boring in concept. Unless there is more to it than has been mentioned so far. Also, it's hard to imagine that David,a boy of 16, would be willing to play this game with his sisters.





I think The Game would be appealing to older teens just as Dungeons and Dragons was and video games are now. From what I've read in this chapter, it seemed to involve creating and taking part in many fantasy adventures.
Librarian

Message Edited by Librarian on 01-04-2008 07:47 PM




I agree with Librarian. I think that the game was like a fantasy that they could play and it would appeal to all from David, who is 16, to Emmeline, who is 10. We also have to take into consideration that it was a different era. Teenagers were more naive and interested in other things, and all this changed later.
"If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away." ~Walden, Henry David Thoreau.
Frequent Contributor
Kimmi373
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital

[ Edited ]

no4daughter wrote:
Although I agree that one of the brothers may be Grace's father, I am not convinced that it is Frederick. Couldn't the major is Grace's father? Perhaps both brothers pined for Grace and the major triumphed over Frederick. If either brother is her father, that would explain Grace's later rise in social status. Yet another trio to go with the 3 people involved in the suicide that Grace has kept secret and the triangle reference in The Game.

It also seems to me that Grace is currently living at Riverton which has been converted into some kind of "facility". Perhaps she is living there as an heir.




I had the same thoughts. Grace is the same age as Hannah, which would mean that Frederick's wife and his mistress, Grace's mother, would have been pregnant at the same time, and that Frederick's wife would have stayed with him at least long enough to have another child by him. The Major, however, has no children and a very plain wife who perhaps, even upon finding out that her husband had been unfaithful, would have been hesitant to leave such a "catch". Also, there is a mystery surrounding the Major's children, one that turned a chatty Nancy mute when she and Grace were speaking about the family. I was thinking that perhaps the Major's wife either could not have children or lost children and that the Major did have one child out of wedlock. With the Major being the "favorite" maybe this would explain why the family did not object to having Grace as an employee. If in fact she is the Major's child the family might feel both affection to Grace and at the same time feel the inclination to punish her for being "the bastard" child. Sort of a love/hate thing.

Message Edited by Kimmi373 on 01-04-2008 08:17 PM
I don’t want realism. I want magic!
~ Tennessee Williams, "A Streetcar Named Desire"
Contributor
sbrinkley
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎10-02-2007
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital

i wondering if grace is related to the family somehow and thats why her mother doesn't serve for the family, when she was on the bacoly, it was like he seen a ghost, and how hannah kept asking her if they meant before because she looked familer, i'm really enjoying the book and all the questions that arise, but i hope theres more about the game because i agree with another post, so far it sounds boring and why would these children of different ages be interested in this game, i beleive that when the rules where done and signed emmeline was 4 years old i would like to know more about the game
Frequent Contributor
crazyasitsounds
Posts: 41
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital



KxBurns wrote:
And did anyone else catch that Grace notes her own imagination has been informed by Gothic novels?




Yes, I caught that right away. I thought it was particularly interesting because the description on the back of the book specifically mentions Daphne du Maurier. It's an interesting to think that Grace's Gothic-flavored recollections are (a) Gothic-flavored because she's read Gothic novels & (b) written by an author with Gothic influences.
Inspired Contributor
goingeast
Posts: 89
Registered: ‎01-03-2007
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital

p.49 Mr. Frederick is a widower.
Frequent Contributor
fordmg
Posts: 546
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital



CathyB wrote:
Waiting for the Recital

What secrets about Grace's tie at Riverton are they all keeping? Nancy is shocked
that Grace's mother never talked about her time there. Grace didn't know her father.
Mrs. T indicates that Grace's mother is a fine girl ... Guilty of nothing that ain't
been done a thousand times before.
Did she do someting that led to her dismissal
from Riverton? Did she have higher expectations in life and leave to pursue them?

Although we don't see the relationship between the Major and Mr. Frederick, we do see that
the parents had an obvious favorite: Major Jonathan. They saw Mr. Frederick as a disappointment. I have to ask, did their favoritism play a part in his future behavior
and what he did with his life - flitting from one endeavor to another.

-CathyB




Major Jonathan was the first born. He inherits everything. Mr. Frederick is second, and always second place. He doesn't seem to make a place for himself and there is the issues about how his children are being raised.
MG
Frequent Contributor
bookhunter
Posts: 322
Registered: ‎06-09-2007
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital

IF Grace is the daughter of one of these "gentlemen" then I have some questions.

Why is she brought back to the house in service? Does the family know who she is? Do the servants know who she is? Why didn't her mother tell her--especially in preparation for sending her to Riverton?

Does Frederick (or whoever) even know she is his daughter? It could be something only known by the servants and Grace's mother--she was hustled away before anyone found out. I can't imagine that the family would knowingly bring an illegitement child into the house--in contact with half brothers and sisters (or cousins)? I could see it happening if it were an open secret that they all knew but never talked about. But Grace doesn't seem to have a clue who her father is.

If she is related, it will certainly bring her out of the shadows of servitude and into the limelight of the story.

Ann, bookhunter
Reader 2
TheSleepyReader
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital


kdenisse86 wrote:


Librarian wrote:

goingeast wrote:
I thought the Major didn't have any children but we haven't found out why yet. I don't know if I'm the only one who thinks this but The Game sounds rather boring in concept. Unless there is more to it than has been mentioned so far. Also, it's hard to imagine that David,a boy of 16, would be willing to play this game with his sisters.





I think The Game would be appealing to older teens just as Dungeons and Dragons was and video games are now. From what I've read in this chapter, it seemed to involve creating and taking part in many fantasy adventures.
Librarian

Message Edited by Librarian on 01-04-2008 07:47 PM




I agree with Librarian. I think that the game was like a fantasy that they could play and it would appeal to all from David, who is 16, to Emmeline, who is 10. We also have to take into consideration that it was a different era. Teenagers were more naive and interested in other things, and all this changed later.






Yes, and they each got to choose their own character to portray so that would have added to the appeal. Emmeline's choice of Queen Victoria is discussed as dull and we see that she played roles while Hannah and David wrote the adventures. It seems that would appeal to a 16 yo boy.
~Amy~
My Book Blog:
http://sleepyreader.blogspot.com
Frequent Contributor
fordmg
Posts: 546
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital



BetteKidd wrote:
Does anyone think it unusual that the 18 year old brother would still be "playing with" his little sisters. I teach high school and have no students who would be doing that. Bette




On page 28it says "Two girls and a boy: the youngest around ten, the eldest not yet seventeen." That would make David 16. In a closed society, it is not strange that he would play a game with his sisters. They are visiting the grandparents - and there are no other children in the house. What else is he to do. He is not an adult yet.
MG
Frequent Contributor
bookhunter
Posts: 322
Registered: ‎06-09-2007
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital

I loved the part about The Game. In a time of no TVs or video games, I can very easily see how 3 children stranded in the country would spend hours role-playing adventures. The names they choose for themselves are very revealing, I think. Hannah is Nefertiti--Queen of ancient Egypt. That certainly fits with her radical, progressive, suffragette ideals!

The imagery and symbolism of a triangle is amazing, and thanks to those of you who added to what is in the book with hockey and geometry insights. My first thought is a love triangle--which apparently is what leads to the death of the poet. If a triangle is 3 points, how is Grace going to fit into the figure?

Ann, bookhunter
Inspired Correspondent
Bonnie824
Posts: 951
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital



goingeast wrote:
I thought the Major didn't have any children but we haven't found out why yet. I don't know if I'm the only one who thinks this but The Game sounds rather boring in concept. Unless there is more to it than has been mentioned so far. Also, it's hard to imagine that David,a boy of 16, would be willing to play this game with his sisters.




It sounded pretty intensive though, almost like an early dungeons and dragons or some other role play game like that- which teenagers and young adults continue to play. But he did seem to be getting tired of it at 16.

Bonnie
Inspired Correspondent
Bonnie824
Posts: 951
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital



seattle07 wrote:
I agree that Mr. Frederick is Grace's father. He must have been busy that year since Grace and Hannah are both 14 years old.
I thought Hannah's way at getting back at her father (p.43-44) devious and a bit cruel. I guess it also shows her imagination: white slave traders.





Since he had all the power, IMO it was more passive-aggressive out of necessity than devious and cruel. He was unfair in his treatment and attitude to girls.
Bonnie
Inspired Correspondent
Bonnie824
Posts: 951
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital/the Game



BetteKidd wrote:
I think The Game is similar to Dungeons and Dragons that kids used to play...or any role playing games that are popular now. They are all in the imagination but sometimes they get out of control. Remember the kids who went into a sewer or something like that and had a real gun battle; then later they said they were playing Dungeons and Dragons. Bette




Once again, I am reading along, replying to stuff, then come across a post where someone else already thought of my great idea! One of my sons was into those games for awhile. I have never played them, but have done some of the role playing online things to do with shows I've liked.

Bonnie
Wordsmith
Tarri
Posts: 457
Registered: ‎02-26-2007
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital



bookhunter wrote:
IF Grace is the daughter of one of these "gentlemen" then I have some questions.

Why is she brought back to the house in service? Does the family know who she is? Do the servants know who she is? Why didn't her mother tell her--especially in preparation for sending her to Riverton?

Does Frederick (or whoever) even know she is his daughter? It could be something only known by the servants and Grace's mother--she was hustled away before anyone found out. I can't imagine that the family would knowingly bring an illegitement child into the house--in contact with half brothers and sisters (or cousins)? I could see it happening if it were an open secret that they all knew but never talked about. But Grace doesn't seem to have a clue who her father is.

If she is related, it will certainly bring her out of the shadows of servitude and into the limelight of the story.

Ann, bookhunter




If Grace is Frederick's daughter, it is very possible, even probable, that her mother never told him she was pregnant with his child. The family could believe she left in disgrace, not knowing the soon to be Grace is one of them.
Contributor
kdenisse86
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital



Tarri wrote:


bookhunter wrote:
IF Grace is the daughter of one of these "gentlemen" then I have some questions.

Why is she brought back to the house in service? Does the family know who she is? Do the servants know who she is? Why didn't her mother tell her--especially in preparation for sending her to Riverton?

Does Frederick (or whoever) even know she is his daughter? It could be something only known by the servants and Grace's mother--she was hustled away before anyone found out. I can't imagine that the family would knowingly bring an illegitement child into the house--in contact with half brothers and sisters (or cousins)? I could see it happening if it were an open secret that they all knew but never talked about. But Grace doesn't seem to have a clue who her father is.

If she is related, it will certainly bring her out of the shadows of servitude and into the limelight of the story.

Ann, bookhunter




If Grace is Frederick's daughter, it is very possible, even probable, that her mother never told him she was pregnant with his child. The family could believe she left in disgrace, not knowing the soon to be Grace is one of them.




I agree, and I think only Mrs. Townshend knows she is the daughter of one of the masters, which is why she is always nice to Grace and sends her mother things.
"If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away." ~Walden, Henry David Thoreau.
Contributor
StellaBee
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital

I really like the way this story flows. I've finally gotten into a rhythm with Grace's real time thoughts merging with her going back to the past. As I read the earlier chapters, I noticed an emphasis on appearance, eye color, hair color--details that must be the basis for some revelation. I'm waiting to see what Mr. Frederick's reaction (p.50)to seeing Grace on the balcony is about.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
Registered: ‎11-05-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital

[ Edited ]

nfam wrote:


COCOSPALS wrote:
What intrigued me about the section on the Recital is where Grace finds the rules of the game. On page 48, the author outlines Rule #3: only three may play. And the references to the triangle. This really peaked my interest. Anyone who knows anything about hockey knows about the triangle and how if one point of the triangle moves, the other two move accordingly all the while keeping the triangle. My gut feeling is that somehow as the book progresses, the three: David, Hannah and Emmeline, will come to the centerpoint of the goings-on. The integrity of the triangle, their closeness, will either remain in tact or one point of the triangle, one of them, will break apart the triangle. Should be interesting to see how that plays out.



I don't know if this will play a part later but I'm going to keep in mind that rule #3 doesn't indicate that the players always have to be the same


Message Edited by Carmenere_lady on 01-05-2008 08:04 AM
Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire
Distinguished Wordsmith
Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
Registered: ‎11-05-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital

[ Edited ]

MissyJoon wrote:
I have this strange feeling that Grace is Mr. Frederick's daughter. Perhaps that is why she has such an intrinsic affection for the children, and why Mr. Frederick is so keen on her presence.




That may be true but since Hannah and Grace are the same age they could have been twins seperated at birth, ya think.

But after reading more posts it seems more probable that Fred's wife and mistress were pregant at the same time as other people had mentioned.

Message Edited by Carmenere_lady on 01-05-2008 08:06 AM
Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire
Inspired Correspondent
EbonyAngel
Posts: 276
Registered: ‎12-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital



maryfrancesa wrote:
I never really thought about who may be Grace's father. I thought it would have to be someone from the house another servant not a "family" member. Not sure if Frederick's mother would want his "bastard" daughter in the house as a servant. Obviously there are
alot of mysteries to the family and servants.




I think it's possible that Frederick could be Graces father. His mother may not know. What could have happened as in so many stories is that Grace's mother found herself "with child" and was dismissed and never told who the father was. Most likely she was never asked. You know servants lives were not considered important other than the fact of how it affected the "family".
Distinguished Wordsmith
Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
Registered: ‎11-05-2006
0 Kudos

Re: PART ONE: Waiting for the Recital

I really feel that this quote on p. 42 says alot about the family and the way the servants go along with what the family believes.

Nancy to Grace: The family always come together for the midsummer dinner
Grace:But, Nancy.........it's August. Not midsummer at all.
Nancy: Well, of course it's August. Are you daft, girl? And the midsummer dinner will be held on the bank holiday weekend as it always has been. Just you mind Mr. Hamilton doesn't hear you questioning your betters.
Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire
Users Online
Currently online: 26 members 253 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: