Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: See the covers of all the different editions


KathyS wrote:
Hum...? Terrie, you're right, that is a window on that wall...all this time I thought it was a picture frame...I assumed! I'll have to rethink this one....seems an odd place to put a window. Has anyone seen the artist?




After about the third time I looked at the book, I realized it was a window because I was trying hard to see what it was, thinking about that one painting Grace commented about so much in her room, disliking it so. When I realized it was a window, then I thought it was maybe one of two things, it was either stairs at one of the ends of that part of the house that is round and you could look out over that side of the property from there, on a landing, a place for the "frail or winded" to stop and take a breath, but do so in a way that is more gentile, stopping just to look out at the landscape you know. Or that it was just a good way to get some natural light to that part of the staircase. I can't think what you call that part of a house (or castle for that matter( that is a rounded corner like a silo that goes all the way up because thats where the stairs are. But in pictures I have seen of them from the outside, they always had windows, at least one. What is that part of architecture called? I hope this makes sense guys lol, I am still wearing off the affects of the anesthesia from Friday and my eyesight isnt the best, nor my coordination lol.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: See the covers of all the different editions

That was a traditional way to make the main staircase in Enclish country houses. The staircase in our old family home in the North of England had such a staircase, overlooking the front drive and portico where the carriages would pull up. There was a window seat there, and I imagine the children of the family being allowed to come down from the nursery/schoolroom on the third floor to sit in the window seat to watch special guests arrive.

KathyS wrote:
Hum...? Terrie, you're right, that is a window on that wall...all this time I thought it was a picture frame...I assumed! I'll have to rethink this one....seems an odd place to put a window. Has anyone seen the artist?

Terrie wrote:
I like the American one - so far; but the staircase would definitely have to wrap to overlook a room - I think it was said it would be the library? Otherwise, although it is very classy, clean and straightforward, it's a bit plain to me AND the window is distracting to me - as if I need to look outside it to see what's going on. That's why, for me, the staircase would have to continue to wrap to give me a look at the "inside" of the house, kind of pull me into the household. The UK cover personally grabbed me as it is, to me, a classic cover for a victorian novel - plus I am also an avid gardener - but I get the thought that it's a little too feminine to appeal to everyone.





_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Contributor
corym
Posts: 20
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: See the covers of all the different editions

I really enjoyed looking over each cover they are so interesting!
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: See the covers of all the different editions

Thanks, E-man, I'd never seen that before. I've only seen pictures hanging on walls by stairs. Interesting, thanks.
K.

Everyman wrote:
That was a traditional way to make the main staircase in Enclish country houses. The staircase in our old family home in the North of England had such a staircase, overlooking the front drive and portico where the carriages would pull up. There was a window seat there, and I imagine the children of the family being allowed to come down from the nursery/schoolroom on the third floor to sit in the window seat to watch special guests arrive.

KathyS wrote:
Hum...? Terrie, you're right, that is a window on that wall...all this time I thought it was a picture frame...I assumed! I'll have to rethink this one....seems an odd place to put a window. Has anyone seen the artist?

Terrie wrote:
I like the American one - so far; but the staircase would definitely have to wrap to overlook a room - I think it was said it would be the library? Otherwise, although it is very classy, clean and straightforward, it's a bit plain to me AND the window is distracting to me - as if I need to look outside it to see what's going on. That's why, for me, the staircase would have to continue to wrap to give me a look at the "inside" of the house, kind of pull me into the household. The UK cover personally grabbed me as it is, to me, a classic cover for a victorian novel - plus I am also an avid gardener - but I get the thought that it's a little too feminine to appeal to everyone.








Frequent Contributor
krenea1
Posts: 356
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: See the covers of all the different editions

The American version is neat and if I were to see it on the shelf I would probably pick it up. The British version is also neat and different.

I do have to ask. What is the reasoning behind the different book covers depending on the locations?
Karen Renea

Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back
CAG
Inspired Correspondent
CAG
Posts: 218
Registered: ‎01-15-2007
0 Kudos

Re: See the covers of all the different editions

I really liked this comparison of the covers. I thought the American hardcover was the best one.
CAG
Contributor
the_archivist
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
0 Kudos

Re: See the covers of all the different editions

I like them all, but my favorite is the British and then the American. The picture of the garden gate gives the cover an air of mystery and intrigue. The cover is always an important part of the book. I think it helps the reader with the proper mind set for the particular read.

the_archivist
the_archivist
New User
katiecg
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎12-25-2007
0 Kudos

Re: See the covers of all the different editions

I like the Australian cover the best. The name fits the story better in my opinion.
Katie
Frequent Contributor
judycarr
Posts: 31
Registered: ‎12-12-2007
0 Kudos

Re: See the covers of all the different editions

I am glad that I had not seen the Australian edition as I was reading. I would rather have my own image of Grace.....although I must admit because of Ms. Mortons wonderful descriptions Grace did look strikingly like the cover for me. But I would rather think the image came from writing and imagination than a cover. I actually like the cover that did not get used. I think it shows the mystery very well.....the sense that all was not what it seemed to be at Riverton.
Contributor
Caliwriter04
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎12-22-2007
0 Kudos

Re: See the covers of all the different editions

I think I actually like the British cover more than the American one...
Reader
naima17
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎07-06-2007
0 Kudos

Re: See the covers of all the different editions

I like the American cover the best. naima17
Users Online
Currently online: 50 members 1,038 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: