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Contributor
Mostow
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎02-01-2008
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Re: Bulburrow Court

These pictures are wonderful!  It really makes everything I've read come to life. 
 
Thank you so much for sharing them!
 
Mona
Frequent Contributor
Jaelin
Posts: 144
Registered: ‎02-05-2008
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Re: Bulburrow Court

Beautiful Pics!  Thanks for sharing!
Jessee
That is a good book which is opened with expectation and closed in profit.
~ Amos Bronson Alcott ~
Distinguished Wordsmith
MSaff
Posts: 272
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Bulburrow Court

Thank you for posting the pictures. They bring more life to the story.
 
Mike
Mike
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind." Dr. Seuss
http://travelswithcarsandbooks.blogspot.com/
Reader
mmaroni
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎02-01-2008
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Re: Bulborrow Court

I agree.  Now I realize HOW far she fell. It did not feel so far in the book.  How adventurous for them to even to up there!
Meg
Frequent Contributor
mwinasu
Posts: 149
Registered: ‎02-02-2008
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Re: Bulborrow Court

You should use a picture of the house for the front page.
CAG
Inspired Correspondent
CAG
Posts: 218
Registered: ‎01-15-2007
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Re: Bulburrow Court

Thank you for sharing the pictures. They really add to the setting of the novel in my mind.
CAG
Correspondent
Rosei
Posts: 111
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Bulburrow Court

I loved the photos and they really increase our insights about the Sisters' house. Thank you!
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Bulburrow Court

I really loved the pictures also. It makes for a better visual of the premise. You can fit the characters in this house simpler than before seeing them. I love writers that put homes in as characters, it makes for excessabley great characters and you can imagine them in that particular house doing the things they describe them doing.
Contributor
jillhubbs
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎12-29-2006
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Re: Bulburrow Court

These pictures are such a treat to look at! I am more than half way through with the book and often find myself imagining what the home and scenery looked like, seeing these photos just makes reading this book an even richer experience.
-Jill
New User
windwish
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎02-02-2008
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Re: Bulburrow Court

Thanks for the pictures. It's nice to have a visual reference!
Frequent Contributor
thefamilymanager
Posts: 26
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Bulburrow Court

Mwinasu, I completely agree.  When I saw the pictures of the house, it made all of the descriptions of the house come to life, especially the bell tower. The picture of the house should be part of the cover. 
 
Lisa 
LMD

- if I ever go looking for my heart's desire again, I won't look any further than my own back yard. Because if it isn't there, I never really lost it to begin with! - Dorothy - Wizard of OZ
Inspired Contributor
katknit
Posts: 347
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Bulburrow Court

I'm afraid this house does not look very Victorian.
No two persons ever read the same book. [Edmund Wilson]
Inspired Correspondent
Read-n-Rider
Posts: 157
Registered: ‎01-29-2007
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Re: Bulburrow Court

It is obvious from the many comments, here and on the thread with the moth illustrations, that these visuals have significantly enhanced the reading of this novel for a lot of people.  I wonder if the author/publisher would consider including a few illustrations in the final version.  I think that pictures would, for example, help to alleviate what some have felt to be the "dryness" of the scientific description sections of the book.
 
Joan
Contributor
Bethann425
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎04-05-2007
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Re: Bulburrow Court

I enjoyed looking at the pictures.  They do add to the novel of the sisters.  I feel an occassional picture in a book, such as this novel, helps to add to the life of the characters.  I enjoy novels that are closer to life, like The Sisters.  I can see this as a real family, where something caused tension between the sisters, and later in life, close to death, they want to go home and be together again.  I'm only on chapter 4, so the novel may end differently than the direction I think it's going in now.
Beth Ann
Reader 2
hasieb
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎12-24-2007
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Re: Bulburrow Court

The picture really helps. It is a bit less castle and a bit more English home than I had pictured. It sets a nice tone.
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Bulburrow Court : Bullbarrow Hill

[ Edited ]
The author may have taken the name Bulburrow Court from the famous Bulbarrow Hill in Dorset, which is the highest point in Dorset and an ancient burial mound which featured in Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbevilles:- 
 
 
 
After walking on Bullbarrow Hill Hardy wrote:
 
'So I am found on Ingpen Beacon or on Wyll's Neck to the west
Or else on homely Bulbarrow, or little Pilsdon Crest
Where men have never care to haunt, nor women have walked with me,
And ghosts then keep their distance; and I know some liberty.' 
 
 
 
 


Message Edited by Choisya on 03-11-2008 02:35 PM
Frequent Contributor
grapes
Posts: 229
Registered: ‎12-02-2006
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Re: Bulburrow Court

Oh my! This is a great, great treat! I can't stop looking at the photos. Thank you so very much.
Grapes

Grapes
Inspired Correspondent
Maria_H
Posts: 791
Registered: ‎07-19-2007
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Re: Bulburrow Court : Bullbarrow Hill

Hmmmm...definitely a good one to ask of the author, thanks!


Choisya wrote:
The author may have taken the name Bulburrow Court from the famous Bulbarrow Hill in Dorset, which is the highest point in Dorset and an ancient burial mound which featured in Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbevilles:-
After walking on Bullbarrow Hill Hardy wrote:
'So I am found on Ingpen Beacon or on Wyll's Neck to the west
Or else on homely Bulbarrow, or little Pilsdon Crest
Where men have never care to haunt, nor women have walked with me,
And ghosts then keep their distance; and I know some liberty.'



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Contributor
rstjm4
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Re: Bulburrow Court

Very cool pictures! It looks alot like what I had imagined it would. Very castle like!
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Bulburrow Court : Bullbarrow Hill

Hi, Choisya. I wondered where you were.

Will be interesting to see whether Adams did indeed take the name from this source or from somewhere else.

What do you think of the book so far?

Have you used your research skills to look up the possible conditions which Ginny might have, based on Adams's presentation of her, and come to any preliminary conclusions as to what her issue is?


Choisya wrote:
The author may have taken the name Bulburrow Court from the famous Bulbarrow Hill in Dorset, which is the highest point in Dorset and an ancient burial mound which featured in Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbevilles:-
After walking on Bullbarrow Hill Hardy wrote:
'So I am found on Ingpen Beacon or on Wyll's Neck to the west
Or else on homely Bulbarrow, or little Pilsdon Crest
Where men have never care to haunt, nor women have walked with me,
And ghosts then keep their distance; and I know some liberty.'


Message Edited by Choisya on 03-11-2008 02:35 PM


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