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m3girl
Posts: 194
Registered: ‎03-02-2007
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

My comments on Chapter Two...
 
Bulburrow Court sounds like at one time it was a beautiful place - now left to the slow disintegration into ruins...what a shame.
 
Interesting how all three books we have read sofar - have had in the center of the story the large family home that has been in the family for years...
 
Vivi was always the leader - even though she was younger - that was no doubt due to her much more out going personality....she took after her mother while, poor Ginny seemed to get her's from her father.
 
This chapter was a nice introduction to Ginny and Vivi and their relationship to each other and their parents....interesting, well written and made me turn the page to chapter three....
 
Susan
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LisaMM
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎01-28-2008
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower



Jo6353 wrote:
The book never said what actually happened just that Vivi was suddenly falling. Did she fall or was she pushed? Jo



Or did she jump?
www.lisamm.wordpress.com
CAG
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CAG
Posts: 218
Registered: ‎01-15-2007
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

Concerning the Dr. and Ginny - what is that all about?
CAG
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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower



CAG wrote:
Concerning the Dr. and Ginny - what is that all about?

Good question. What do you think?
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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krenea1
Posts: 356
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

This chapter was very interesting. Ginny's observation (there is that word again) about when Vivi came home with the others but did not leave with the others was very intriguing.
 
It was also odd how Maud did not want the girls to be alone. Do you think that she mainly does not Ginny to be left unattended or does it go deeper and she is afraid to be alone with Ginny?
 
Ginny's lack of emotion and Maud's fear of what happened on the Bell Tower gives me the impression that something is not right with Ginny. Maybe there were complications during labor and they could do nothing about it when the snow came. I'm thinking some kind of brain damage that effects her emotions. My step-brother had a car accident 15 years ago and went into a coma with brain damage. He came out and had the mind set of a child. He had to rehabilitate his mind and body but he lost his capability for emotional feelings. It is a weird thing to witness. He can be so cruel and not have any idea that he is being that way. It had something to do with a part of his brain.
 
I'm also perplexed by Ginny's reference that she saw Vivi's entire future giving up the struggle to survive. Is this a possible spiritual vision that she is capable of seeing or just her ability to give a deeper description of what she analyzes?
 
Although the whole incident with the Bell Tower was sad I did giggle a little at the end of the chapter when Vivi learned that girls have all of their eggs at birth and that she told her mother's guests that she lost all of her children. Just like a child to say something like that. I really liked this piece. :smileyvery-happy:
 
I can't wait to see what comes of this story.
Karen Renea

Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back
CAG
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CAG
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

[ Edited ]
 In response to Everyman - I  think I see Ginny as a vulnerable child with some sort of problem, though I am not sure what was wrong with her.  I think the Dr. was interested in her because she was different but my gut tells me he may have taken advantage of her. Just a feeling...


Message Edited by CAG on 03-05-2008 06:37 PM
CAG
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jlawrence77
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

Maud comments "I thought we could have a normal family." She then states "There must be..." and I feel the rest of her comment would be "wrong with Ginny."  This conversation leads me to believe that there is something wrong with Ginny, something they are aware of, and they are trying to hide it and pretend like they have a normal family.
 
Jenn
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jlawrence77
Posts: 17
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

 
"She was making herself comfortable while holding her toast level in her left hand.  I remember saying that I didn't think she should be there, that it looked too dangerous, and she just said "Ginny, don't be so bor-ing", a pair of martins [birds]....startled out from underneath the little ledge.  My heart leapt but Vivi must have lost her balance."  (pg. 14)
 
So, apparently some birds startled Vivi, and she lost her balance. She was holding on to her toast in one hand, so only one hand was supporting her. 
 
Jenn
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dghobbs
Posts: 133
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower



Choisya wrote:
Just a small historical point: People did not necessarily have to be generous to take in evacuees - they were allocated children by the government if they and their homes were considered suitable. Here is some information about evacuation procedures:-
The study of moths has a lot to do with the moon and night time because, like werewolfs, moths are attracted to moonlight as well as to light in general. They hide during the day so are studied at night (or in laboratories of course.) In the UK we have a National Moth Night in June when people go out in groups to identify them.


dhaupt wrote:
I had my suspicion that Maud and Clive were mom and dad and now I am wondering why Ginny was calling them by their first names I guess something else to be sought out later.
Lepidoptery sounds like you turn in to a werewolf at the full moon (ha).
I like that the family is generous in that they took in the evacuees during the war.
I thought it very strange that Maud and the doctor spent so much time w/Ginny about Vivi's accident, I wonder if they had cause to think she had something to do with it, and Maud alludes to the fact that there might be something "off" in Ginny on page 16 when Ginny overhears her parents talking and Maude says "There must be something ___".
We know for sure that Vivi didn't have any children of her own, but we don't find out if Ginny did for sure
The author takes a lot of time describing the house I wonder if this house has talking walls.




Message Edited by Choisya on 03-05-2008 02:38 PM




Great point about the evacuations - I thought that taking in the children was a little less than voluntary. :smileyhappy:Doug
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dragonfly33
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Registered: ‎02-05-2008
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

I totally agree.  Why are they assuming Ginny did something wrong.  Why don't they believe her?  Why didn't she cry?  Did she not understand, be in shock or is there somthing wrong with her? 
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suzi966
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎01-29-2008
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

My thought in this chapter was that there is something wrong with Ginny that Maude, Clive and the doctor know but no one else does.  The comment about thinking they could be a normal family, Maude and the dr. thinking Ginny might have had something to do with Vivi's fall and Ginny's lake of emotion all made me think this.
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nfam
Posts: 231
Registered: ‎01-08-2007
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

This chapter started to build some very strange relationships. I love the description of the house and the fact that it's a shrine to killing and pinning insects. It seems the perfect setting for some very macabre happenings.

Ginny seems a very strange child. She calls her mother Maud, insists that she's very fond of Vivi, but somehow it doesn't fit. I wonder if she would have pulled the bell rope if Vivi hadn't. Somehow it seems that both the parents and the doctor have some questions about what happened on the tower. At the least, Ginny is a very strange child.

I'm looking forward to reading about the rest of the family's problems. Neat story.

Nancy
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KxBurns
Posts: 1,006
Registered: ‎09-06-2007
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower



krenea1 wrote:
Ginny's lack of emotion and Maud's fear of what happened on the Bell Tower gives me the impression that something is not right with Ginny. Maybe there were complications during labor and they could do nothing about it when the snow came. I'm thinking some kind of brain damage that effects her emotions.
 
I'm also perplexed by Ginny's reference that she saw Vivi's entire future giving up the struggle to survive. Is this a possible spiritual vision that she is capable of seeing or just her ability to give a deeper description of what she analyzes?

I have been puzzling over the significance of the story of Ginny's birth, wondering how it fits into the clues we have so far. It seemed too vivid to be irrelevant to the story, and your suggestion certainly makes sense of it!
 
Ginny's comment about Vivi's Entire Future leaving her body is definitely a sophisticated thought for a child her age. I was actually more intrgued by the fact Ginny sees her own future disappear as well. If she views her fate to be so intertwined with her sister's, it doesn't really stand to reason that she would have pushed her to almost certain death, does it?  
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erina
Posts: 30
Registered: ‎02-04-2008
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

I agree, Ginny recognizes this from an early age.  pg 13 "Viven was from a fantastic world, definitely not the same one as mine.  I thought when God made Vivi he was giving me a window to see the world in a different way...She spent hours meticulously planning her life - and mine." 
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erina
Posts: 30
Registered: ‎02-04-2008
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

I agree, how popular were psychiatrists in the 40s?  I would venure to guess it was their general doctor who made house calls and was an "expert" on everything.  
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erina
Posts: 30
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

I also found that comment interesting.  I think it is giving us a sneak peak at how Ginny knew from an early age that they were different and their family treated them differently. 
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erina
Posts: 30
Registered: ‎02-04-2008
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

Sorry, I thought I had the previous posts in my post!  Oops
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bookfan08
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎02-01-2008
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

I think that Ginny was really terrifies when Viiv fell. When she was "questioned" by Maud and the Dr. (Who is this man and what role does he have in the story?) she froze up, she knew it wasn't her fault but because she had never seen Maud this emotional she did not know how to explain to her what really happened. I think that even though Ginny id the older sister she is more laid back and follows Vivi instead of the younger sister following the older. The last paragraph is foreshadowing something that happens later in the book. 
kbc
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kbc
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

I really struggled to get through this chapter.  I just didn’t find it very interesting.  I think it was all the description of Bulburrow Court that got to me.  I’m just not a huge fan of that type of detail.  On the character and plot side of things, I did wonder why there seemed to be some suspicion about Ginny’s account of Vivi’s fall from the bell tower.  I also wonder what Maud meant when she said that she thought they could live as a normal family (p. 16).  I felt that there was something weird about the doctor too, the way Ginny says he always wanted to talk to her.  Made me wonder what was behind that.

"…whilst she was on that stretcher I actually saw her Entire Future giving up the struggle to survive and leave her and at the same time I felt my own future reduced to a dead and eventless vacuum, a mere biological process" (p. 15).   Why is “Entire Future” capitalized?

LyndenMomof2 wrote: “As I read the descriptions in the book it is apparant to me the writers background as a documetarist.  I feel as if I am getting too much descriptions of things that may or may not be neccessary.  Just a random thought.”

I was thinking the same thing as I was reading the description of the estate. 

ladydi22 wrote: “I am more creeped out by the doctor than the bugs at this point.  Hope he goes away! “

Me too! 

What else, oh, yes, I assumed the doctor was a general practice doctor, not a psychiatrist/psychologist.  I still believe that but I guess maybe we’ll find out more later.

dhaupt wrote:  “I totally agree with you Karen, I have 3 siblings and it amazes me how differently we remember things.”

My sister and I talk about this all the time, how we each remember things differently.  In fact, sometimes we can’t agree on anything happening the same way as we each think it did.  It drives my husband crazy that we have different versions of our childhood.

OK.  Off to read Chapter 3.  I’m so far behind.  I hope I can catch up before the next round of chapter threads goes up.

 

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crazyasitsounds
Posts: 41
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Chapter 2: The Bell Tower

I got the impression that Ginny's unemotional response was just a coping mechanism. But I couldn't understand why all the adults questioned her version of events; it seemed like they were trying to make her feel guilty regardless of whether the accident was her fault.

Are we to gather from the end of this chapter that neither sister had children? If that is the case, then how or why does Ginny believe that children are "what life was all about and nothing else mattered" (p. 21)?


I was wondering that myself. I couldn't tell whether Ginny's belief was based on personal experience &, if so, whether she had just had the desire to have children but never actually had any.
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