Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Distinguished Wordsmith
Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
Registered: ‎11-05-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture



paula_02912 wrote:
Karen wrote: "This is a fascinating theory, but then the book would not really be about sisters at all, would it?"
 
Karen, that's a good question, but the book is called The Sister, implying that it is about one person...if Ginny does have a psychological problem...at one point I thought she was a little schizophrenic...then it would make sense that she believes that Vivi does exist...could be she has multiple personality disorder...one never knows until we get to the end right? It would interesting to see as we keep going...


NO SPOILER, JUST A HUGE ASSUMPTION:  I've been thinking about this since we learned the title of the book and my very long reach is that there is another sister.  The sister we haven't heard about yet. Any thoughts about that possibility?
Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire
Distinguished Wordsmith
Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
Registered: ‎11-05-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture

There's a little voice in my head.  It's Ginny, and she's saying.........I'll get you my pretty and your little dog, Simon too.  cackle, cackle, cackle :smileywink:
Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire
Frequent Contributor
LeftBrainer
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture

I'm stuck by the similarity between the sisters attitude toward furniture and me and my sister.  My sister considered the stuff in our parents house as treasures to sell.  I wanted to back a dumpster up to the front door and start pitching stuff into it.  She did it her way as she lives locally to the house.  I gave up trying to help because she wouldn't let me get rid of anything. 
Frequent Contributor
tgem
Posts: 270
Registered: ‎08-06-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture

[ Edited ]

KxBurns (our moderator) asks -  What in this chapter caught your attention?

My reply:

  • Some of those posting about this story have mentioned that Ginny likes to be in control.  The chapter opens with her describing the house as a ship and herself, as the captain of the ship.
  • She comments that as a child she and her sister knew everyone in their town, and now she knows no one.
  • She describes her mother's death without emotion.  "Maude's death...was pain-free...although probably not as dignified as she'd have liked." (p23)
  • We learn that it was after Maud's death that Vivi left and had never returned.
  • Ginny's only links with the world are the ex-gardener, Michael and leaflets left at the door by a Social Services lady.
  • When Ginny first sees her sister, she thinks she's seen a ghost - Maude.
  • Ginny focuses again on her ability to hide her true feelings and how it irritated Ginny.
  • It seems because of this, Ginny initially hides her feelings and speaks "coolly." (p27)
  • Vivi speaks warmly, and Ginny starts her process of observing her, taking cues from her and doing what she thinks she should do.
  • Their reunion progresses from happy to strained very quickly.
  • Ginny wonders why Vivi has come home.
  • Vivi's stuffed pet pig head is the only thing of hers that's left.
  • Ginny kept all of her father's mothing equipment and museum.

Vivien is so upset about the missing furniture, despite not caring enough about it or Ginny enough to enquire about them for almost forty years.  It makes me wonder if part of why she came back is for material reasons.  She also speaks to Ginny with condescension and sarcasm. 

KxBurns wrote in part:

While there are some moments of warmth between Ginny and Vivi, I think the chapter ends on an ominous note. As Ginny is reflecting on how "devoted and inseparable" she and Vivi are, the kettle begins to scream "at full steam, shrill and desperate," which I interpret as a metaphor for the fact that the tension between the sisters is building to a boiling point.


I agree.  Ginny has taken the time to make tea for her sister and when the chapter ends with: "I [Ginny] took it off the hot plate," I see this as her trying to ease the tension and make ammends.

"Why is it that as people grow old they cling to possessions and let go of knowledge?" (p33)



Message Edited by tgem on 03-04-2008 09:51 PM
Frequent Contributor
tgem
Posts: 270
Registered: ‎08-06-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture

bikeyesuzi wrote:
Come on...exactly how long does a person have to wait before it is decided that they don't care about the property? Isn't there a Statute of Limitations? I'd say that if someone has been away for half a century, they've given up their say in what happens to property they've abandoned. So far, it appears to me that Vivien has done absolutely nothing to keep up with her sister or make any attempt to help with upkeep on the property over 50 years.

If I lived in a home for 50 years and someone came strolling back after 50 years trying to call the shots, I'd be more than a little upset.

Suzi,
 
I like your use of the word abandoned.  It seems to me that Vivien has abandoned her sister. But why?  We were informed in this chapter that Vivien left and didn't come back after their mother's death. 
 
tgem
Frequent Contributor
tgem
Posts: 270
Registered: ‎08-06-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture



COCOSPALS wrote:
Since I can't figure out how to respond to a specific posting (help????), I am responding to Blondemom74037's post about the furniture.  I wonder if  Ginny sold off the furniture because she really couldn't care less about the material things or she is wiping away some memories. I get the feeling that Ginny is one of these people who doesn't need much, doesn't need the material things and if they are just sitting there collecting dust, then get rid of them.


Message Edited by COCOSPALS on 03-04-2008 01:00 PM
COCOSPALS:  you probably remembered by now - just click on the curved arrow on the top left of the original message.  tgem

Frequent Contributor
grapes
Posts: 229
Registered: ‎12-02-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture






sriensche wrote:
gosox wrote:
 
. . . Although I am no expert on the condition, does anyone else think that Ginny might exhibit some symptons of Asperger's/autism?
 
Wondered the same thing.  Some of her actions are more than OCD, and her complete lack of emotional ties led me to think there is more to Ginny than just an eccentric reclusive woman.  However if there is something "different" about her how could her sister leave her completely alone and cut off for so many years?


The word sociopathic entered my mind. I quickly dropped that idea. Ginny loves Vivi too much. Sociopaths don't have any caring emotions about other people. I have seen a lot of information on tv about autism. You might very well have hit the nail on the head. Is this why the doctor questions Ginny so closely? He know there is something medically wrong far above just sibling rivalry.
 
Some parents or a parent are unable to handle special children. The parent might see themselves as the cause of the problem. This might lead to guilt. Then, this leads to feelings of dislike for the particular child, in this instance, Ginny is Maud's battlefront. She might see Ginny as flawed biologically.
 
Grapes
 



Grapes
Contributor
AmyEJ
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎02-05-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture

Someone may have already mentioned this and I missed it in my attempt to speed read and catch up with the posts, so I apologize if I'm repeating.  But I was struck by the description of Maud's death.  No only was it without emotion, but it didn't even get its own paragraph; it followed the description of Vera's death.  Even though she says that death "had the biggest impact on [their] lives," you wouldn't know it from the description.  I suppose it could have just been too painful to discuss more than that, even after all of those years, but I still found it odd. 
Frequent Contributor
LisaMM
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎01-28-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture



AmyEJ wrote:
Someone may have already mentioned this and I missed it in my attempt to speed read and catch up with the posts, so I apologize if I'm repeating.  But I was struck by the description of Maud's death.  No only was it without emotion, but it didn't even get its own paragraph; it followed the description of Vera's death.  Even though she says that death "had the biggest impact on [their] lives," you wouldn't know it from the description.  I suppose it could have just been too painful to discuss more than that, even after all of those years, but I still found it odd. 



I'm assuming we're going to hear more about it in later chapters. If it was so life changing, I would hope there'd be more than a sentence or two about it.
www.lisamm.wordpress.com
Frequent Contributor
AnnieS
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎01-29-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture

Amyej wrote :
Someone may have already mentioned this and I missed it in my attempt to speed read and catch up with the posts, so I apologize if I'm repeating.  But I was struck by the description of Maud's death.  No only was it without emotion, but it didn't even get its own paragraph; it followed the description of Vera's death.  Even though she says that death "had the biggest impact on [their] lives," you wouldn't know it from the description.  I suppose it could have just been too painful to discuss more than that, even after all of those years, but I still found it odd. 

I am not sure what disability Ginny has, but I think she has one.  I believe she lives a life a matter of fact.  In her mind the deaths changed things around her - routines, organization.  I believe this is what she means.  Vera died, there would be change.  Maude dies and Vivi leaves - change.  I believe Ginny ties her emotions (or lack of) to anything that disrupts order and routine. 
Frequent Contributor
pigwidgeon
Posts: 293
Registered: ‎01-28-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: 2 are 1?


GMorrison wrote: This dovetails very nicely with the theory that Ginny and Vivi are one person. Perhaps Vivi was the genuine expression of Ginny's personality. One could make an argument with the single person theory that this means Ginny might actually have fallen from the bell tower, and a traumatic near death experience at her age could certainly have resulted in psychological damage (hence Dr. Moyse's visits).

Ginny certainly seems to feel that she's in the twilight era of her life. So perhaps "Vivi's" return, with her pet, her driver, cellphone, affluent lifestyle, and her concern "normal" things like appearance, finances, and material possessions is symbolic of Ginny's imagining what her life could have been like had she managed to break free of her parents and assert her real personality.



I'm not completely sold on this concept yet... but... could the 2 sisters, being 2 personalities of Ginny, explain the whole "I didn't know she was my sister, I thought she was an evacuee!" anomaly? Could Ginny have suffered some severe psychological trauma in her early years (possibly while the evacuees were present) that caused a break (Severe Dissociative Disorder), and subsequently, the "arrival" of Vivi after the evacuees' departure. If this theory holds water, I could be coming around to the larger concept...
Contributor
purplepaigeturner
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture

In answer to the question ask as to what struck me in this chapter. I saw a vast difference in each of the sisters perception of the house. Ginny who has been living in the house does not see the emptiness and decay. Just as I feel she does not see the changes in the outside world. Vivian who comes from the outside world can see the changes. And I am still not clear about who owns the house. And if ginny had a right to make these changes. And if it is Ginny's home why does she feel intimidated by Vivian's presence.
I also agree with some opinions that they seem a bit old acting for 60 something. Being 61 myself I have trouble thinking these women are in my age group.
 
paige turner
Frequent Contributor
grapes
Posts: 229
Registered: ‎12-02-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture



FrankieD wrote:
It's all just "stuff" and a lot of people have too much of it anyway. After being away for so long, and apparantly not having any involvement in the affairs of the household over her years away...why should Vivi have any say in where the stuff was? It certainly was Ginny's right to do what was best for her own survival as well as the survival of the estate.
                                                                              FrankieD :smileyhappy:


I do think Ginny has more to say about the property than Vivi. Vivi's been gone for fifty years. Then again, there are some steps you don't take without getting in touch with a sibling. For example, you just don't start selling off every piece of furniture without trying very hard to make contact with the missing sibling. A house is not just a house. A house is a home. It's filled with precious memories. Those memories are brought closer to us by being able to continually see a four poster bed our parents slept in, a clock with its special tick, tick, tick and a desk where you might have sat to write a journal.
 
The way Ginny just got rid of all the furniture proves to me she is a shallow thinker. Some people have used the word "robotic" to describe Ginny.  I think, in this instance, she does act like a robot. Where is her heart? When Vivi begins to name the items gone forever, I feel like crying. There is the "porcelain, that, that oyster mirror just there."
 
Vivi remembers exactly where the oyster mirror had been on the wall. I still remember the furniture in my childhood home. The furniture is part of the family's history. This is what makes Vivi so angry. I felt angry too.
Grapes
Grapes
Frequent Contributor
grapes
Posts: 229
Registered: ‎12-02-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture



paula_02912 wrote:
 
The most important passage to me, however, is on page 29 where Ginny says, "I'm aware for the first time that part of me went missing a long time ago, that without [Vivi] I'd become a different person and I 've just had a taste of who I used to be or even what I might have become had she been there."
 
This passage is a very poignant one in the sense that it seems that when Vivi left, Ginny "died". Vivi was her "life" and in coming back she has brought Ginny back to life...reminiscent of the passage at the end of chapter two talking about Vivi losing the ability to give life as a result of her fall from the bell tower...


It's almost like Ginny and Vivi are twins. So often twins are described as feeling this type of close relationship. I wonder if they are twins just not identical, fraternal.
Grapes
Grapes
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture

[ Edited ]


purplepaigeturner wrote:
In answer to the question ask as to what struck me in this chapter. I saw a vast difference in each of the sisters perception of the house. Ginny who has been living in the house does not see the emptiness and decay. Just as I feel she does not see the changes in the outside world. Vivian who comes from the outside world can see the changes. And I am still not clear about who owns the house. And if ginny had a right to make these changes. And if it is Ginny's home why does she feel intimidated by Vivian's presence.
I also agree with some opinions that they seem a bit old acting for 60 something. Being 61 myself I have trouble thinking these women are in my age group.
 


I think the sisters perceived the house differently too but I do think Ginny was aware of the condition of the house at least to some extent. When her sister first arrives she comments how 3 wings are vacant and when Vivi asks what happened to the house she responds that it's beginning to fall down. She also mentions that selling the furniture has been a gradual process that has been going on for the last 10 years or longer. It's not suddenly empty and a shock for her as it is for her sister. 
 
I agree that she seems to act older than 60 but I wonder if that has to do with her reclusive behavior. I would think her feelings of intimidation are related to that. She's been away from her sister far longer than she ever lived with her. They have no idea what each other is like now and how it will be to live together again.
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
**additional comment**
 I was wondering where it came from that the sisters are in their 60s? I don't recall where ages were mentioned in the story but I noticed on page 23 that Vivi was 21 when she left the house for the last time and Ginny was 24. If she has been gone for 50 years they would be 71 and 74. Did I miss something? I haven't read all of the comments yet so was this my mistake?



Message Edited by Wrighty on 03-05-2008 03:08 PM
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture



grapes wrote:


FrankieD wrote:
It's all just "stuff" and a lot of people have too much of it anyway. After being away for so long, and apparantly not having any involvement in the affairs of the household over her years away...why should Vivi have any say in where the stuff was? It certainly was Ginny's right to do what was best for her own survival as well as the survival of the estate.
                                                                              FrankieD :smileyhappy:


I do think Ginny has more to say about the property than Vivi. Vivi's been gone for fifty years. Then again, there are some steps you don't take without getting in touch with a sibling. For example, you just don't start selling off every piece of furniture without trying very hard to make contact with the missing sibling. A house is not just a house. A house is a home. It's filled with precious memories. Those memories are brought closer to us by being able to continually see a four poster bed our parents slept in, a clock with its special tick, tick, tick and a desk where you might have sat to write a journal.
 
The way Ginny just got rid of all the furniture proves to me she is a shallow thinker. Some people have used the word "robotic" to describe Ginny.  I think, in this instance, she does act like a robot. Where is her heart? When Vivi begins to name the items gone forever, I feel like crying. There is the "porcelain, that, that oyster mirror just there."
 
Vivi remembers exactly where the oyster mirror had been on the wall. I still remember the furniture in my childhood home. The furniture is part of the family's history. This is what makes Vivi so angry. I felt angry too.
Grapes


I don't know their past yet to understand exactly how they are each effected by the sale of the furniture. Ginny's comments did make me think that it had become more of a burden than anything else. She was alone in a huge house with no family except a sister she hadn't spoken to in 50 years. She wasn't being cruel or thoughtless. She saw the furniture as clutter and it was stressful for her to manage all of it. It did represent generations of their family but she said there was no one to pass it on to after them. It would be sold off after their deaths and the money would go to the government. She didn't want that to happen and she needed the money to manage the household now.
 
I agree that a house is filled with memories but she didn't sell those. The best situation would have been to tell Vivien before she did anything but something happened that caused her to move away so long ago. I don't know enough of the story yet but if she left and had no contact with her sister and made no attempt to help keep the family home running than Ginny should be able to do as she see fit. After 50 years she may have assumed she would never come back again. I'm very curious to see what caused all of this to happen and why Vivi decided to come back now.
 

Frequent Contributor
fordmg
Posts: 546
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture



runnybabbit620 wrote:
I liked your reply, BookWoman718.  Why, indeed, if she sold off the detrius of the past 4 generations did she not do more to put herself more into a life of comfort? (Or was she being cheated by the man who was selling her antique furniture from her?  We find that, later on in the chapter, he not only took and sold old furniture, but other various bits of the house and their (Ginny's and Vivi's) past.  My thought is that maybe, since this house is so old and rambling that the money that she made having the furniture sold probably ended up offsetting the cost of heating the South wing Ginny lived in from that time on?  (I assume Europe's fuel costs rise just as much as they do here in the US of A.)  Still, if Ginny had a way to contact Vivi about the house, why didn't she mention/ask her about selling some items of furniture to help offset heating/income, etc?  It's as if this is Ginny's and Ginny's house alone, not Ginny's and Vivi's.
 
Vivi, while calling her into question regarding her selling some of the family heirloom items, points out other items that could have had more value or brought in more on their own and goes on to list "the Charles the Second chest in the hall...or the settle, or the sideboard, and Aubusson tapestry, a few caquetoire chairs...a painting, ...furniture, rock-crystal chandeliers, dressers, carpets, canteens, silver, vases, mirrors, porcelain, ...that oyster mirror just there... the William and Mary..."  I can see the case in selling either type of heirloom to offset her pension and to help clear the clutter, but, if Ginny's so analytical (and appears to have been so her whole life) then why did she overlook these things?  Vivi says later that Ginny's always been hopeless with money, but I find this hard to swallow as she has applied for grants with her father for their lepidoptery research funds.
 
And why not put some of that income into restoring the parts of the house that she noticed were falling into a sad state of disrepair?
 
Vivi seems to be returning because "(S)he needs me now. After all, I'm her older sister."  There seems to be some warmth to Vivi's return.  We'll have to see if this warmth continues.


Besides the fact that Ginny says she is getting rid of the clutter of old things, she is also using the proceeds to live on.  She couldn't figure out how to work a bank account, so she went to the barter system.  I agree with several who said that she probably did not get full value for the things that were sold.  I am sure that she was taken advantage of...but Ginny really did not see any worth in all the old things.  Vivian did.  But now Ginny has nothing to show for what is sold because all she did was buy food and pay utilities with her proceeds.  She only sold things off when she needed to spend money.
MG
Frequent Contributor
fordmg
Posts: 546
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture



Everyman wrote:
My experience is that it is true for people in their 80s, maybe their 70s, but not for people in their 60s (which is my current decade). Most of my age group who are dying, and there aren't that many of them, are dying of accidental death, heart disease, cancer, and other specific diseases which can strike at any age, not of "old age." My mother-in-law, in her late 80s, does indeed see her cohort dying of what is basically old age, and she does feel that she's being gradually deserted, but Ginnie, commenting on a process that obviously she already felt had been underway for awhile, must have started thinking this way in her 60s, which I don't think would be likely. (67 may feel old to Poppy Adams, who is still in her child bearing years, but to those of us who are actually in our 60s, it's still early mid-life!)

gosox wrote:
I found Ginny's comment that "the more people you outlive, the more your life read[s] like a catalog of other people's deaths" (23) particularly poignant. Having talked to several people about the aging process, her comment certainly rings true.
Yes Everyman, I don't feel old at 60.  My friends are all still working and active.   Poppy doesn't seem to have a good handle on generations. 
MG


Moderator
KxBurns
Posts: 1,006
Registered: ‎09-06-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture

I'm glad you brought up Vera's death, AmyEJ.
 

I know the housekeeper Vera has been discussed in relation to why the family might have kept her around after letting go of most of the household staff. But I'm curious to hear what you think of the dramatic and grotesque metamorphosis that this character undergoes?

Vera's transformation is described vividly in Chapter 2:  "She had wiry gray hair, and she'd been alive so long that her body was slowly shrinking, except for her nose that grew instead and became slightly redder and more bulbous as time went by. Vivi said that Vera's nose was sucking the life out of the rest of her body for its own independent growth." (p. 11)

Of Vera's death, which Ginny recalls in Chapter 3, Maud tells her daughters, "…really she just slowly blew up and eventually burst" (p. 23).

How does this reflect the themes of the book so far? Specifically, does anything in the girls' (or Maud's) reaction to Vera and her death offer insight into their personalities?

Frequent Contributor
grapes
Posts: 229
Registered: ‎12-02-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 3: Vivien, a Small Dog, and the Missing Furniture

It's impossible to make a good argument because FrankieD you are thinking of all the sold furniture as "just stuff." I see the "stuff" as  having some sentimental value. What would it hurt to try and find Vivi to ask whether any of the items from their childhood meant something special to her. With that question asked Vivi might have surprised Ginny by being able to help her out of any financial difficulties. It might have become a serendipitous question for Ginny.
 
I'm not sure Ginny is being totally truthful about monetary difficulties. Ginny is eccentric. It just sounds like she wanted to do one big spring cleaning. Then again, the furniture might have brought back painful memories. She could have grown sad and  tired of living in a haunted house. :smileysad:  I suppose this could answer why she made a decision and wasted no time carrying it out.
 
I also feel like, for whatever reasons, Ginny didn't think she would ever see again, not after so many years had passed. If I were Ginny, at times I would have thought my sister must have died. It's just impossible to think someone could have gone away for so long without getting in touch at all. So strange.
 
I keep too much stuff myself.
 
Grapes




FrankieD wrote:
It's all just "stuff" and a lot of people have too much of it anyway. After being away for so long, and apparantly not having any involvement in the affairs of the household over her years away...why should Vivi have any say in where the stuff was? It certainly was Ginny's right to do what was best for her own survival as well as the survival of the estate.
                                                                              FrankieD :smileyhappy:


I do think Ginny has more to say about the property than Vivi. Vivi's been gone for fifty years. Then again, there are some steps you don't take without getting in touch with a sibling. For example, you just don't start selling off every piece of furniture without trying very hard to make contact with the missing sibling. A house is not just a house. A house is a home. It's filled with precious memories. Those memories are brought closer to us by being able to continually see a four poster bed our parents slept in, a clock with its special tick, tick, tick and a desk where you might have sat to write a journal.
 
The way Ginny just got rid of all the furniture proves to me she is a shallow thinker. Some people have used the word "robotic" to describe Ginny.  I think, in this instance, she does act like a robot. Where is her heart? When Vivi begins to name the items gone forever, I feel like crying. There is the "porcelain, that, that oyster mirror just there."
 
Vivi remembers exactly where the oyster mirror had been on the wall. I still remember the furniture in my childhood home. The furniture is part of the family's history. This is what makes Vivi so angry. I felt angry too.
Grapes



Grapes
Users Online
Currently online: 4 members 665 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: