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KxBurns
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Miscellaneous Links

[ Edited ]
Here is a place to post links to additional information about book-related topics of interest. I know several of you posted links to some great sites about lepidoptery so feel free to add them here!
 
This link may come in handy as you read the description of Bulburrow Court:
 
(Note: Probaby not such an issue here, but no spoilers! Please keep pace with the chapter thread postings...)
 
Cheers!
Karen


Message Edited by KxBurns on 03-04-2008 03:45 PM
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ELee
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Chapter 5

A picture of the Monster, a Privet Hawk moth caterpillar
 
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Peppermill
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Re: Chapter 5, p. 54

A repeat of links that are also posted under Chapter 5's own thread. These are for any of you that are as curious as I was about the appearance of the various types of moths named on page 54. I think of moths as those grayish, brownish winged creatures that lay eggs in my woolens that then eat them as those eggs "hatch." Some of these approach butterflies in beauty.

Six Spot Burnet
http://ukmoths.org.uk/keywordsearch.php?keyword1=six+spot+burnet

Lobster Moth
http://ukmoths.org.uk/show.php?id=284

Thumbnails for Oak Eggar
http://ukmoths.org.uk/search.php?entry=oak%20eggar&thumbnail=true

Also, three of the thumbnails in closeups (adult moths):
http://ukmoths.org.uk/show.php?id=250
http://ukmoths.org.uk/show.php?id=975
http://ukmoths.org.uk/show.php?id=3077

Thumbnails of Convolvulus hawk
http://tinyurl.com/ywphaz

Thumbnails of Lime hawk
http://tinyurl.com/yrh97a

Clicking on the thumbnails produces larger images.

Note that all of these are UK moths. While some may exist in the US, where I started searching, those I looked for did not. I don't know the migratory patterns or dispersion of these animals.
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
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Re: Bulburrow Court

Thought this deserved to be over here too.

pigwidgeon wrote:

ELee wrote:
Here is a picture of a Victorian folly castle, which is how Poppy Adams describes Bulburrow court in her letter.

Just wanted to thank ELee for the great photo! If you haven't had a look, click on the link...
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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AnnaB
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Re: Bulburrow Court

What a great photo.  It helps to have a visual!  Love it!  Thank you!
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carriele
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Elusive death's head moth

Here is a link to a great picture of the death's head moth.  You can see a close up of the skull like image on it's back where it gets it's name from. 
 
 
 
Carrie E. 
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Laurabairn
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Re: Elusive death's head moth

Thanks to all for the photos and links. It's been a little slow going in the story for me so the visuals really help!
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DSaff
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Re: Elusive death's head moth



carriele wrote:
Here is a link to a great picture of the death's head moth.  You can see a close up of the skull like image on it's back where it gets it's name from. 
 
 
 
Carrie E. 


That is soooo creepy. Thanks for posting it.
DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
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krenea1
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Re: Elusive death's head moth



carriele wrote:
Here is a link to a great picture of the death's head moth.  You can see a close up of the skull like image on it's back where it gets it's name from. 
 
 
 
Carrie E. 



Did they use this moth in the movie The Mothman prophecies? It seems like I remember seeing it in the movie at a certain part. Pretty creepy.
Karen Renea

Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back
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Peppermill
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Re: Some more links related to chapter 2 and to moths

Below is copied from another thread (thanks, Choisya):

Choisya wrote:
Just a small historical point: People did not necessarily have to be generous to take in evacuees - they were allocated children by the government if they and their homes were considered suitable. Here is some information about evacuation procedures:-

http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/Homework/war/evacuation.htm


The study of moths has a lot to do with the moon and night time because, like werewolfs, moths are attracted to moonlight as well as to light in general. They hide during the day so are studied at night (or in laboratories of course.) In the UK we have a National Moth Night in June when people go out in groups to identify them.

http://www.nationalmothnight.info/
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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ELee
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Re: Miscellaneous Links

Scroll down for pictures of a Robinson trap
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Maria_H
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Re: Miscellaneous Links

Here's a short profile in today's NYTimes about a couple in Pennsylvania who wrote a book on nurturing a healthy local ecosystem to help bugs survive -- moths and butterflies, too.


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Peppermill
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Re: Miscellaneous Links


Maria_H wrote:
Here's a short profile in today's NYTimes about a couple in Pennsylvania who wrote a book on nurturing a healthy local ecosystem to help bugs survive -- moths and butterflies, too.


Neat article! Thanks, Maria

"He cites the work of Michael Rosenzweig, an evolutionary biologist based at the University of Arizona, who has analyzed data from all over the world and found a one-to-one correspondence between habitat destruction and species loss. In Delaware, for instance, state ecologists say that 40 percent of all native plant species identified in 1966 are threatened or extinct; 41 percent of native birds that depend on forest cover are rare or absent.

"So the message is loud and clear: gardeners could slow the rate of extinction by planting natives in their yards. In the northeast, a patch of violets will feed fritillary caterpillars. A patch of phlox could support eight species of butterflies. The buttonbush shrub, which has little white flowers, feeds 18 species of butterflies and moths; and blueberry bushes, which support 288 species of moths and butterflies, thrive in big pots on a terrace. (Appropriate species for other regions are listed by local native plant societies.)" (See link above.)
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
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Re: Robinson Trap and Moths


ELee wrote:
Scroll down for pictures of a Robinson trap





Thanks! The link here to the moths caught is interesting, too.
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
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Re: More on Moths

Below is a repeat of some links put up elsewhere by Choisya.

For those who wish to look up the names of British moths as they read, here are a couple of informative websites about species native to the UK:-

http://ukmoths.org.uk/top20.php

http://piclib.nhm.ac.uk/piclib/www/search.php?search=moth

And two interesting news items:-

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/essex/3151301.stm

http://www.royalparks.org.uk/press/current/press_release_92.cfm

And for those of you who fancy having a go at catching moths in your back garden (for later release of course!):-

http://www.back-garden-moths.co.uk/techlight.htm

http://www.atropos.info/gardenmoths.html
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
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Re: Miscellaneous Links

I just made an entry on another thread about the symbolism of butterflies and moths. That all brought me back to a chapter of Anna Karenina that I just read for the Epics board. It is short, but full of moths. I thought readers here might enjoy it:

http://pd.sparknotes.com/lit/anna/section106.html

Now, I must think again about the symbolisms as Tolstoy used them, as the Karenin's face the "death" of their marriage and the metamorphosis of their lives in the hands of the old lawyer.
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Maria_H
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Re: Miscellaneous Links

A new study may prove that learned behavior is retained in the transformation from caterpillar to moth: Moths Can Remember Caterpillar Days.


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bookhunter
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Re: Miscellaneous Links



Maria_H wrote:
A new study may prove that learned behavior is retained in the transformation from caterpillar to moth: Moths Can Remember Caterpillar Days.


Now what will be the significance of this news for humans?  We should be able to access previous lives or ancestoral memories?  Genetic material in transplanted organs will have some influence on the recipient?  The sci-fi writers are sharpening their pencils...
 
Ann, bookhunter (who doesn't retain memories from YESTERDAY, much less from my caterpillar days!)
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