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vivico1
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Re: Questions for the Editor


BookWoman718 wrote:

Carole, thanks for joining in this discussion, and sharing your insights with us. My question to you would be whether you felt that some parts of the book just didn't ring true. For me, the description of Ginny sounded more like a woman in ill health in her 80s, rather than her 60s. The 60-something women I know, as I said in a post on another thread, if they chose to live alone, would be picking up books at the library, taking long walks in the countryside, and renting movies from Netflix. So did you question that at all? I wondered if Poppy Adams had much experience around women of that age, or perhaps she just sees everyone over 50 as old. (I can remember those days when we didn't trust anyone over 30.)





I have to agree about the age thing, that kept bugging me. I kept feeling I was reading about two women nearing their 80s (and I have a friend and mother who would resent that lol) rather than two women in their mid to last 60s. Both of these women seem way way too old for the 60s, even the tail end of it. Half the women I seem to know anymore are int their 60s and would also resent that lol. I know that a lot of us kept going over parts of the story to figure their ages again cause it just didnt fit for any women of this 1900's, not American women anyway. Did you notice that as you were first reading this book Carole? And imagine this in as a movie. If you did it with two women playing that age, it just wouldnt feel the same at all, as the book does making them seem older.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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bookhunter
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Re: Questions for the Editor



vivico1 wrote:

BookWoman718 wrote:

Carole, thanks for joining in this discussion, and sharing your insights with us. My question to you would be whether you felt that some parts of the book just didn't ring true. For me, the description of Ginny sounded more like a woman in ill health in her 80s, rather than her 60s. The 60-something women I know, as I said in a post on another thread, if they chose to live alone, would be picking up books at the library, taking long walks in the countryside, and renting movies from Netflix. So did you question that at all? I wondered if Poppy Adams had much experience around women of that age, or perhaps she just sees everyone over 50 as old. (I can remember those days when we didn't trust anyone over 30.)





I have to agree about the age thing, that kept bugging me. I kept feeling I was reading about two women nearing their 80s (and I have a friend and mother who would resent that lol) rather than two women in their mid to last 60s. Both of these women seem way way too old for the 60s, even the tail end of it. Half the women I seem to know anymore are int their 60s and would also resent that lol. I know that a lot of us kept going over parts of the story to figure their ages again cause it just didnt fit for any women of this 1900's, not American women anyway. Did you notice that as you were first reading this book Carole? And imagine this in as a movie. If you did it with two women playing that age, it just wouldnt feel the same at all, as the book does making them seem older.

BookWoman and Vivico,  I am going to disagree with you on this.  When you look a the book as a whole, the characteristics that make Ginny seem old early in the book are really characteristics of her "oddities."  Their arthritis seems (in my very unprofessional opinion) to be the severe kind that strikes and cripples at any age--not just arthritis from natural aging.  Vivi DOES get out to church, to visit Eileen, talks on a cell phone, and arrives stylishly dressed.  Ginny does none of those things, but it is not because she is "old."
 
(Pardon my intrusion into your thread, Ms. Baron!)
Ann, bookhunter
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vivico1
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Re: Questions for the Editor


bookhunter wrote:


vivico1 wrote:

BookWoman718 wrote:

Carole, thanks for joining in this discussion, and sharing your insights with us. My question to you would be whether you felt that some parts of the book just didn't ring true. For me, the description of Ginny sounded more like a woman in ill health in her 80s, rather than her 60s. The 60-something women I know, as I said in a post on another thread, if they chose to live alone, would be picking up books at the library, taking long walks in the countryside, and renting movies from Netflix. So did you question that at all? I wondered if Poppy Adams had much experience around women of that age, or perhaps she just sees everyone over 50 as old. (I can remember those days when we didn't trust anyone over 30.)





I have to agree about the age thing, that kept bugging me. I kept feeling I was reading about two women nearing their 80s (and I have a friend and mother who would resent that lol) rather than two women in their mid to last 60s. Both of these women seem way way too old for the 60s, even the tail end of it. Half the women I seem to know anymore are int their 60s and would also resent that lol. I know that a lot of us kept going over parts of the story to figure their ages again cause it just didnt fit for any women of this 1900's, not American women anyway. Did you notice that as you were first reading this book Carole? And imagine this in as a movie. If you did it with two women playing that age, it just wouldnt feel the same at all, as the book does making them seem older.

BookWoman and Vivico, I am going to disagree with you on this. When you look a the book as a whole, the characteristics that make Ginny seem old early in the book are really characteristics of her "oddities." Their arthritis seems (in my very unprofessional opinion) to be the severe kind that strikes and cripples at any age--not just arthritis from natural aging. Vivi DOES get out to church, to visit Eileen, talks on a cell phone, and arrives stylishly dressed. Ginny does none of those things, but it is not because she is "old."
(Pardon my intrusion into your thread, Ms. Baron!)
Ann, bookhunter



Ann, its not just the arthritis, I am 51 and I have arthritis, thats why I didn't mention arthritis, its their whole demeanor and other physical problems and attributes. Its just them overall.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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dordavis33
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Re: Questions for the Editor

Ms. Baron,

Thank you for the opportunity to read The Sister. I have to admit I was captivated almost immediately by Ginny's behavior. I kept thinking something is definitely not right with this lady, then eventually the whole family. I had to go back to my literature class days because I am thinking that there is so much to this story. My interpretation is that the Stone family represents humanity in general. It is so easy and safe to regard such unpleasant familial qualities as repulsive and think one could never fall to such depravity, but the truth is anyone is capable of becoming a Clive, Maud, Ginny, or Vivien...an abuser, manipulator, mentally unstable, or even worse a murderer. The potential rests in every human being; it is just easier to think that other people are that way. Ms. Adams takes readers out of our comfort zone and causes us to look at the darker side of family relations, especially the dynamics between sisters.
Maybe this wasn't her take on the book but either way, it was indeed an interesting read. Once again, thanks for the opportunity!
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umlaut
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Re: Questions for the Editor

I think following things should be done:
1. Make moth references subtle
2. Inter-relationship between the characters of the family should be mentioned in more detail.
3. Going back and forth between past and current is not very refined. I am not sure what... But i didn't like how it was laid out.
4. the font of the title needs to be changed..the drop shadow, makes me dizzy.
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HannibalCat
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Registered: ‎10-25-2006
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Re: Questions for the Editor



Carole_Baron wrote:


Jeanie0522 wrote:
I would agree that the moth science does add a certain unique quality to the novel; however, I am not sure that it will have as wide of public appeal that it would have without so much of that included. Since it is clear that the final editing of the book has been done, this may not be the time to mention that I did find a couple of typo's in the ARC.
I have finished the book, but will not communicate any spoilers. I truly think that the only thing that may hold this book back is the "moth talk." It is important to make a book unique, but I think at some point the balance of moths outweighed the story line. Here is where it would seem that editing is important. Of course this is only my opinion and I did enjoy the story. I wish Poppy Adams much success. I will certainly recommend the book, but I will also indicate that moth science is very much part of the book.


Hello; I am happy you liked the story. Many people have liked the moth theme that seemed to be reflected in the story of this one family. I am sure Popppy will like to hear from you. But remember, this is her first book and I know she is nervous about hearing from everyone. Thanks for takiing the time to read. CB P.S. Remember, the galley you have is uncorrected; it will be proofread so don't worry about the typos.





The moth aspect of the book was put so aptly by one poster (sorry, I can't remember who) who stated that Clive left Ginny in her own pupal soup. We had to know the history of that in order to fully appreciate how at sea Ginny was when Clive up and left. She was left to live 47 years of only "self" communication and feedback. How could she grow and improve over the years when there was no one to tell her she was doo-lally. Vivi could have told her over the years and may have helped her to live a better life, but Vivi ran away, too. I feel very sorry for Ginny. Her illness really left her with no way out of her own cocoon.
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Carole_Baron
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Re: Questions for the Editor



bookhunter wrote:


vivico1 wrote:

BookWoman718 wrote:

Carole, thanks for joining in this discussion, and sharing your insights with us. My question to you would be whether you felt that some parts of the book just didn't ring true. For me, the description of Ginny sounded more like a woman in ill health in her 80s, rather than her 60s. The 60-something women I know, as I said in a post on another thread, if they chose to live alone, would be picking up books at the library, taking long walks in the countryside, and renting movies from Netflix. So did you question that at all? I wondered if Poppy Adams had much experience around women of that age, or perhaps she just sees everyone over 50 as old. (I can remember those days when we didn't trust anyone over 30.)





I have to agree about the age thing, that kept bugging me. I kept feeling I was reading about two women nearing their 80s (and I have a friend and mother who would resent that lol) rather than two women in their mid to last 60s. Both of these women seem way way too old for the 60s, even the tail end of it. Half the women I seem to know anymore are int their 60s and would also resent that lol. I know that a lot of us kept going over parts of the story to figure their ages again cause it just didnt fit for any women of this 1900's, not American women anyway. Did you notice that as you were first reading this book Carole? And imagine this in as a movie. If you did it with two women playing that age, it just wouldnt feel the same at all, as the book does making them seem older.

BookWoman and Vivico,  I am going to disagree with you on this.  When you look a the book as a whole, the characteristics that make Ginny seem old early in the book are really characteristics of her "oddities."  Their arthritis seems (in my very unprofessional opinion) to be the severe kind that strikes and cripples at any age--not just arthritis from natural aging.  Vivi DOES get out to church, to visit Eileen, talks on a cell phone, and arrives stylishly dressed.  Ginny does none of those things, but it is not because she is "old."
 
(Pardon my intrusion into your thread, Ms. Baron!)
Ann, bookhunter


i didn't really think about their age.  Like you I know more woman at the age of 60 who are vital and energetic.  But then they didn't have the childhood or grow up in the circumstances of Ginny and Vivi.  It was a question,as you say Ann, bookhunter, Ginny's stay at home was more a part of her "oddities".  I don't think she did much at the age of 30 either.  Her life was AT HOME. Vivi did get out but clearly retired, or was retired. SoI had no problem with their age.   Carole


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Carole_Baron
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Re: Questions for the Editor



vivico1 wrote:

bookhunter wrote:


vivico1 wrote:

BookWoman718 wrote:

Carole, thanks for joining in this discussion, and sharing your insights with us. My question to you would be whether you felt that some parts of the book just didn't ring true. For me, the description of Ginny sounded more like a woman in ill health in her 80s, rather than her 60s. The 60-something women I know, as I said in a post on another thread, if they chose to live alone, would be picking up books at the library, taking long walks in the countryside, and renting movies from Netflix. So did you question that at all? I wondered if Poppy Adams had much experience around women of that age, or perhaps she just sees everyone over 50 as old. (I can remember those days when we didn't trust anyone over 30.)





I have to agree about the age thing, that kept bugging me. I kept feeling I was reading about two women nearing their 80s (and I have a friend and mother who would resent that lol) rather than two women in their mid to last 60s. Both of these women seem way way too old for the 60s, even the tail end of it. Half the women I seem to know anymore are int their 60s and would also resent that lol. I know that a lot of us kept going over parts of the story to figure their ages again cause it just didnt fit for any women of this 1900's, not American women anyway. Did you notice that as you were first reading this book Carole? And imagine this in as a movie. If you did it with two women playing that age, it just wouldnt feel the same at all, as the book does making them seem older.

BookWoman and Vivico, I am going to disagree with you on this. When you look a the book as a whole, the characteristics that make Ginny seem old early in the book are really characteristics of her "oddities." Their arthritis seems (in my very unprofessional opinion) to be the severe kind that strikes and cripples at any age--not just arthritis from natural aging. Vivi DOES get out to church, to visit Eileen, talks on a cell phone, and arrives stylishly dressed. Ginny does none of those things, but it is not because she is "old."
(Pardon my intrusion into your thread, Ms. Baron!)
Ann, bookhunter



Ann, its not just the arthritis, I am 51 and I have arthritis, thats why I didn't mention arthritis, its their whole demeanor and other physical problems and attributes. Its just them overall.

 Part of Ginny's oddness was that she stayed at home and didn't want to see anyone. It wasn't a question of age or illness.  It was who she was.  cb


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Carole_Baron
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Re: Questions for the Editor

actually, yes.  The author tried to be meticulous and had it read by the professionals.  But why don't you ask her next week more about it.  Poppy is a scientist herself, although this is not her field, so she respected the idea of getting it right. Thanks for asking the question.


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Carole_Baron
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Re: Questions for the Editor



Everyman wrote:
Ms. Baron: I don't know how long you'll be with us, but I want to thank you for taking the time to be here and for your insightful comments. It's been very interesting.

I always enjoy talking about books that I read. I hope you have a little insight of the editorial process.


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Carole_Baron
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Re: Questions for the Editor



PattyJean wrote:
I loved the book - hard for me to go back to discussing individual chapters as it all flowed very well for me. Liked the moths - they reminded me of how Ginny was put away in a sense...moths flying out of old clothing when brought to light and secrets flying out of the sisters when their lives were brought to light. I was hooked from the first page.

I could only guess at what Dr. Moyce was up to - but guessed that Ginny was autistic? Reading too much into it?

.Dr. Moyce was a strange one.  He probably was in love with Maude.  Now there is an idea.  Clearly they thought something was wrong with Ginny.  I am glad you liked the book.  It certainly is one of the most involving books I have read in a long time.


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Carole_Baron
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Re: Questions for the Editor



dordavis33 wrote:
Ms. Baron,

Thank you for the opportunity to read The Sister. I have to admit I was captivated almost immediately by Ginny's behavior. I kept thinking something is definitely not right with this lady, then eventually the whole family. I had to go back to my literature class days because I am thinking that there is so much to this story. My interpretation is that the Stone family represents humanity in general. It is so easy and safe to regard such unpleasant familial qualities as repulsive and think one could never fall to such depravity, but the truth is anyone is capable of becoming a Clive, Maud, Ginny, or Vivien...an abuser, manipulator, mentally unstable, or even worse a murderer. The potential rests in every human being; it is just easier to think that other people are that way. Ms. Adams takes readers out of our comfort zone and causes us to look at the darker side of family relations, especially the dynamics between sisters.
Maybe this wasn't her take on the book but either way, it was indeed an interesting read. Once again, thanks for the opportunity!

It always fascinates me to read a story in the first person where we are only getting one point of view.  And I always have to ask myself if that Point of View is accurate.  The family dynamic is constantly changing and Ginny's perceptions challenge the reader.  I agree, Poppy Adams takes us on a ride odf questioning what we thing we know.  But the final point is that I think she has written a terrific story.


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vivico1
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Re: Questions for the Editor


Carole_Baron wrote:


PattyJean wrote:
I loved the book - hard for me to go back to discussing individual chapters as it all flowed very well for me. Liked the moths - they reminded me of how Ginny was put away in a sense...moths flying out of old clothing when brought to light and secrets flying out of the sisters when their lives were brought to light. I was hooked from the first page.

I could only guess at what Dr. Moyce was up to - but guessed that Ginny was autistic? Reading too much into it?

.Dr. Moyce was a strange one. He probably was in love with Maude. Now there is an idea. Clearly they thought something was wrong with Ginny. I am glad you liked the book. It certainly is one of the most involving books I have read in a long time.



I read a book called Preditor by Patricia Cornwall, where part of it is about studies they are doing on death row psychotic killers. Trying to see how their brain functioned (or didnt) and one of the tests they did on them, was basically the card game here. They were shown these pictures of people's faces with various expressions. The theory being, sociopaths of this type, could not distinguish appropriate expressions for the pictures. They couldnt read them, couldnt connect the facial expression with what it might mean. I thought about that when we finally read about the card game the Doctor was playing with Ginny and then he did seem more of a psychiatric doctor looking for something, instead of the creepy perv I was afraid he might be. But then I was seeing him through Ginny's eyes, that could not see clearly the world around her anyway. She was always, looking through a glass darkly.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Maria_H
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Re: Questions for the Editor

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ladylala
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Re: Questions for the Editor

I feel the character (Ginny) is quite interesting...I'm just SO disappointed b/c I feel I know more about moths than I do her. This book falls short of what the potential is in such a flagrant way that I'm frustrated having spent the time to read the book. I craved to learn more of her and found myself skipping over the "moth tirades". It seems that the author was writing from the heart when writing about Virginia but went into a mode of "look Ma, I'm writing" when moths were involved. Poppy, I hope that you consider a "rewrite". Find the place from which Ginny came from, sit down, and have another conversation with her. Leave the moths to Mother Nature.
What we do not make conscious emerges later as fate.
-Carl Jung
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3M
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Re: Questions for the Editor

I am so glad you stated that the moth info was staying in the book. In my opinion, it was essential to the multiple layers of the novel.

However, I did notice quite a few typos. I do hope those will be edited out.
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