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KxBurns
Posts: 1,006
Registered: ‎09-06-2007
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Re: Tuesday and Today



mimi29 wrote:
I wanted to know so much more about these characters.  I am left with many (too many?) questions.
What was Vivi's purpose in returning to Bulborrow Court?  What had she be doing for the last forty-something years?  Her reaction to the grave of the baby...her inablility to make an emotional connection  to someone she so desperately wanted,  mirrors Ginny's behavior throughout the book.  I found that curious.  Was Ginny severely autistic? What ever happened to Dr. Moyse...and what were those tests he gave Ginny?
I finished this book in the middle of a sleepless night, thinking that reading it might help me get to sleep at 4:00 A.M.  Wrong!  My head was swimming with questions!
 


Hi mimi29 - the question of why Vivi came home is an interesting one because my take is that what Vivi encounters upon her return ends up changing the nature of her stay. And this makes it harder for us to understand her original intentions.
 
Since Ginny herself admits toward the end that she never knew her sister, I looked at Vivien's own statements on the matter. In the confrontation they have about Maud's death, Vivien at one point says, "I didn't come back home to tell you this, I came home to keep you company..." This explanation is supported by the very first chapter where Ginny states that Vivien said she was coming home so the sisters could keep each other company in their final years.
 
Of course it does not completely jibe with what we see of Vivien -- prowling around the house, provoking and challenging Ginny's Order of Things. But I attribute this dissonance to both Ginny's point of view and the fact that Vivi is completely taken by surprise by the changes she finds in both her sister and Bulburrow Court.
 
That's just my interpretation of it. :smileyhappy:  What do you think?
 
I really like your point that Vivi's stoic reaction to Samuel's grave mirrors Ginny's own lack of emotion throughout the book. Do you think this is an example of a learned coping technique that both sisters use to differing degrees? It certainly supports the idea that Ginny's problems were dispositional in nature (rather than a defined mental disorder) and were exacerbated by her environment over time. Vivi had learned the same defenses but because of her more social nature and her greater interaction with the world, she had quite a different outcome...
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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Tuesday and Today



KxBurns wrote:


mimi29 wrote:
I wanted to know so much more about these characters. I am left with many (too many?) questions.
What was Vivi's purpose in returning to Bulborrow Court? What had she be doing for the last forty-something years? Her reaction to the grave of the baby...her inablility to make an emotional connection to someone she so desperately wanted, mirrors Ginny's behavior throughout the book. I found that curious. Was Ginny severely autistic? What ever happened to Dr. Moyse...and what were those tests he gave Ginny?
I finished this book in the middle of a sleepless night, thinking that reading it might help me get to sleep at 4:00 A.M. Wrong! My head was swimming with questions!


Hi mimi29 - the question of why Vivi came home is an interesting one because my take is that what Vivi encounters upon her return ends up changing the nature of her stay. And this makes it harder for us to understand her original intentions.
Since Ginny herself admits toward the end that she never knew her sister, I looked at Vivien's own statements on the matter. In the confrontation they have about Maud's death, Vivien at one point says, "I didn't come back home to tell you this, I came home to keep you company..." This explanation is supported by the very first chapter where Ginny states that Vivien said she was coming home so the sisters could keep each other company in their final years.
Of course it does not completely jibe with what we see of Vivien -- prowling around the house, provoking and challenging Ginny's Order of Things. But I attribute this dissonance to both Ginny's point of view and the fact that Vivi is completely taken by surprise by the changes she finds in both her sister and Bulburrow Court.
That's just my interpretation of it. :smileyhappy: What do you think?
I really like your point that Vivi's stoic reaction to Samuel's grave mirrors Ginny's own lack of emotion throughout the book. Do you think this is an example of a learned coping technique that both sisters use to differing degrees? It certainly supports the idea that Ginny's problems were dispositional in nature (rather than a defined mental disorder) and were exacerbated by her environment over time. Vivi had learned the same defenses but because of her more social nature and her greater interaction with the world, she had quite a different outcome...




Karen --I think your thoughts on why Vivi came back are probably as close as we will get to understanding the why, but how realistic do you think it is that a woman who hadn't seen her sister for some thirty or forty years and as far as we know had no contact with her during that time, and who hadn't been back to her childhood home for about fifty, would just write a letter saying essentially "I'm coming back to live with you" without any preliminary conversations, any visit to the house to touch base with her sister, any "is this okay with you?," or any other contact? This is what makes me wonder whether we're getting the real story on why Vivi came back. I find it hard to believe that a normal (ore even mostly normal) person would act this way. Which makes me wonder, is there something as eccentric with Vivi as there is with Ginny, and if so what?

Or do you think this is the way a normal person would indeed behave?
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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KxBurns
Posts: 1,006
Registered: ‎09-06-2007
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Re: Tuesday and Today



Everyman wrote:

Karen --I think your thoughts on why Vivi came back are probably as close as we will get to understanding the why, but how realistic do you think it is that a woman who hadn't seen her sister for some thirty or forty years and as far as we know had no contact with her during that time, and who hadn't been back to her childhood home for about fifty, would just write a letter saying essentially "I'm coming back to live with you" without any preliminary conversations, any visit to the house to touch base with her sister, any "is this okay with you?," or any other contact? This is what makes me wonder whether we're getting the real story on why Vivi came back. I find it hard to believe that a normal (ore even mostly normal) person would act this way. Which makes me wonder, is there something as eccentric with Vivi as there is with Ginny, and if so what?

Or do you think this is the way a normal person would indeed behave?

Oh, I don't think any member of this family is normal!...
Contributor
hsb7766
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Tuesday and Today

I would agree that I was a bit disappointed that the loose ends were not tied up: What was Ginny's disability?, Why did Maud say Ginny ruined her life?, Where did Arthur go and why didn't he keep checking in on Ginny?.
 
It was a bit disconcerting that we NEVER knew anything Vivi was thinking. 
 
The end reminded me of "Life of Pi":  did it all really happen or was this a story Ginny made up in her head?
 
Heather
"It is well to read everything of something and something of everything." -Lord Henry P. Brougham
Correspondent
m3girl
Posts: 194
Registered: ‎03-02-2007
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Re: Tuesday and Today

I guess in these final two chapters I really thought most if not all of my questions would be answered....they were not.
 
Chapter 23
Who is Michael?  No answers.
 
Today
Is she in a prison mental hospital because she was caught?  Or is she in a regular mental hospital because she is nuts?  Or is she in a retirement home?  Was she taken away because she killed her sister or because she was too old and too nuts to live all alone in that big house.  If that is the case, why didn't they relocate her years ago?
 
I was disappointed that many of my questions were not clearly answered - left to my interpretation???
 
Susan
Correspondent
Rosei
Posts: 111
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Tuesday and Today

I think that this stream of questions that keep haunted my mind after reading the book is probably what Poppy Adams planned to the reader. Those questions are going to reverberate in my mind for long, I'm sure of that. And I may say I like it.
 
My main impression is that I was all the time seeing things through a narrator on who I should doubt all the time. Many things are unexplained exactly because Ginny was telling us what came into her mind, her own impressions and feelings.
 
I think that in the end she had her "revenge" and, in a way, she broke the chains that hold her at Bulburrow Court. She always felt the less loved one and the weaker, but to be true I think that she really showed everyone else that she was the stronger, even diving into her own "better exchange".
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niknak13
Posts: 26
Registered: ‎02-05-2008
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Re: Tuesday and Today

I have mixed feelings about the ending of the book.  I don't need to have everything wrapped up in a neat little package for me, but I did expect a bit more.  I'd like to have known a bit more about Ginny's "condition."  Or I'd like the ending to be a bit more sinister.  Or something.  Just a little something more. 
Contributor
dragonfly33
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎02-05-2008
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Re: Tuesday and Today

I agree  I was very dissapointed and very confused???
3M
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3M
Posts: 24
Registered: ‎12-13-2007
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Re: Tuesday and Today

I actually love the fact that things weren't neatly wrapped up. I don't mind at all when the author lets the readers come to their own conclusions.
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