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MattW
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Nancy Drew & the new movie

I'm starting to see movie trailers for the new Nancy Drew movie, which arrives in theaters the weekend of June 15th. Looks great! I posted this in another board, but I'm hoping that kids re-discover the classic books along with the new movie. There's so much history there!

How do you think that younger readers in this day and age will appreciate the classic Nancy Drew as much? How did Nancy Drew have an impact on you when you were young?
Matt
Teens Editor, B&N.com
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Everyman
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie



MattW wrote:
I'm starting to see movie trailers for the new Nancy Drew movie, which arrives in theaters the weekend of June 15th. Looks great! I posted this in another board, but I'm hoping that kids re-discover the classic books along with the new movie.

Elsewhere on BNBC there has been an ongoing discussion of whether kids who watch movies are more or less inclined to read the books they're made from. The general thinking is that kids who watch the movie won't want the slower paced, less visually exciting option of reading the book; they think they already know what it's about, and that's all they need.

What do people here think? Will watching a Nancy Drew movie encourage kids to go get the books to read, or not?
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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jinglesdelarock
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie

I work in the kids department at a Barnes and Noble and really popular books turned into movies do encourage kids to read. Some kids just aren't modivated to read but when they see a movie they like they're more attracted to the book it was based on. However I will be extremly dissapointed in the Nancy Drew movie if the producers have decided to take this role model of a book and turn it into an unnecessary love story, IE: having Nancy fall in love or like a boy with the mysteries on the side. I just hate how media for young children ages 5-13 is based on crushes and love. I feel that a powerful idol like Nancy Drew should stay an positive role model for girls teaching them that they too can be smart, and do whatever they want...not just fall for some boy.
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ginger81
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie

I agree. I was so excited when I saw the trailor for the movie! Nancy Drew was always one of my favorites. In fact, I am going to try to re-read some of the novels.
I also would like to see this movie be a big success. I teach 7th & 8th grade, and I would love for my female students to have a strong female character to relate to and to look up to!

GW
GW
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becke_davis
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie

I think modern kids will like the new Nancy Drew. I'm not sure if the original Nancy Drew books will hold the charm for them that they did for me. When I reread them as an adult I was a little sad because they had lost a lot of the mystique. I LOVED them when I was young. I've never been to Louisiana but I still think of The Mystery of the Old Bayou and the images it brought to mind when I read that at about age 10. I think I'd like to preserve those early impressions! But the books have been continued and now they are aimed at a more modern audience, so hopefully kids today will still enjoy them.
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MattW
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie

I hear you, Becke, about the Nancy Drew books losing their mystique. While I wasn't a ND fan, I was a Hardy Boys fan, and re-reading those books have had the same effect on me: I was a little sad when I tried to re-read them again because some of the luster had gone out. Then again, it's amazing to see a child discover a classic for the first time!

I'm not saying that ND falls into this, but it still stuns me how there are books that are made just for kids, while others are made for kids AND adults -- some kids' books 'wink over children's heads' so that adults can appreciate them on another level. I'm not sure whether I agree that's right, though. What do others think about that? Sometimes I see picture books out there that are so wordy, and I think, how in the world can a child read those words on his/her own? When they get old enough to read the words on their own, will they even be interested in that picture book anymore?
Matt
Teens Editor, B&N.com
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becke_davis
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie

I agree with you, to a point. The Harry Potter books are full of multisyllabic words and that doesn't stop kids reading them. One of the things I liked with the old Nancy Drew books was that they used words I didn't know, and that made the books seem kind of exotic to me: coupe, attorney, hearth (which I mispronounced for YEARS) -- words that adults might have taken for granted, but they were new to me at the time.
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MattW
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie



becke_davis wrote:
I agree with you, to a point. The Harry Potter books are full of multisyllabic words and that doesn't stop kids reading them. One of the things I liked with the old Nancy Drew books was that they used words I didn't know, and that made the books seem kind of exotic to me: coupe, attorney, hearth (which I mispronounced for YEARS) -- words that adults might have taken for granted, but they were new to me at the time.




Right, and I totally agree. I don't have a problem with books being challenging for kids, of course, in terms of vocabulary - I'm speaking more about children's books that are on another level that may be beyond them. For example, a picture book that's too wordy for kids at a picture book reading level, so they can't appreciate reading it for themselves.
Matt
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becke_davis
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie

You're right, I've noticed that in some books for early readers. My son had trouble reading at first, until he discovered the Hop on Pop, Bears on Wheels type books. At the beginning of the summer he was reading those, and within a few months he was reading Boxcar Children books.

It's like a lot of supposedly "kids" movies today, that are full of innuendo and jokes that are clearly aimed at the adults watching with the kids. Maybe some authors are assuming adults will be reading to the kids, if their books are so wordy.
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pianoplayer
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie

It is hard to get a child to read a book after seeing the movie. We tried to get our daughter to read "Charlotte's Web" and "Meet the Robinsons" after seeing the movie and it just didn't work. We are trying something different with the new Nancy Drew Movie. Our daughter is hosting a summer book club. They are reading "The Movie Star Mystery" before the movie is released on June 15, 2007. All book club members and their parents signed a contract agreeing to participate in related reading and writing activities. The reward is a trip to the movie and ice afterwards. I will give an update in two weeks to let everyone know how it worked. For now the girls are very excited. By the way, my daughter is an avid reader (second grade) who loves to solve mysteries but had no interest in Nancy Drew previously.
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MattW
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie



pianoplayer wrote:
It is hard to get a child to read a book after seeing the movie. We tried to get our daughter to read "Charlotte's Web" and "Meet the Robinsons" after seeing the movie and it just didn't work. We are trying something different with the new Nancy Drew Movie. Our daughter is hosting a summer book club. They are reading "The Movie Star Mystery" before the movie is released on June 15, 2007. All book club members and their parents signed a contract agreeing to participate in related reading and writing activities. The reward is a trip to the movie and ice afterwards. I will give an update in two weeks to let everyone know how it worked. For now the girls are very excited. By the way, my daughter is an avid reader (second grade) who loves to solve mysteries but had no interest in Nancy Drew previously.




I think that's a terrific idea to get kids to read the book before the movie comes out - they'll be able to compare their opinion of the book to the movie, which can get their critical skills firing. I'm interested to hear how your plan works out!
Matt
Teens Editor, B&N.com
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AGEHAMIL
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie

The policy in our home has always been that you read the book (or have it read to you) before you see the movie. Often older movies are on DVD. We have read, The Mixed up Files of Mrs. basil E. Frankweiler and then rented the movie as a treat when we were done. So often the book is So much better than the movie! Also, I like my kids to use their imaginations to picture the characters as they see them not as the casting directors see them. That is why I never buy trade paperbacks with scenes from the film and always try to find ones with the original illustrations.
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Wrighty
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie


AGEHAMIL wrote:
The policy in our home has always been that you read the book (or have it read to you) before you see the movie. Often older movies are on DVD. We have read, The Mixed up Files of Mrs. basil E. Frankweiler and then rented the movie as a treat when we were done. So often the book is So much better than the movie! Also, I like my kids to use their imaginations to picture the characters as they see them not as the casting directors see them. That is why I never buy trade paperbacks with scenes from the film and always try to find ones with the original illustrations.




That's a great idea and I bet your children will develop habits that they will enjoy their whole life. I do the same thing for myself but my kids don't follow it. They are teenagers and they often see reading as a chore so I don't force it on them. I want them to enjoy it, not grow to hate it. I just keep trying to find books and magazines that they will enjoy and when I do it's like striking gold. Hopefully this way they will love it again as adults the way they did when they were little.
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JulieZ
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie

I just saw the new Nancy Drew movie last night -- at Shankweiler's Drive-In Theater, the oldest existing drive-in in the country. I loved the books when I was younger, and I was worried that the movie would be a disappointment. However, I really enjoyed it, and the movie did a great job of staying faithful to the books. The movie was quite scary and suspenseful for a kid's movie, and it used many of the plot devices seen in the books. There was a bit of a subplot with boys (but no more than the books, where Ned was always tagging along but Nancy was in charge). I can remember my mom telling me to "Be like Nancy Drew," when I was little, and the Nancy of the movie was still a great role model for smart, responsible, confident girls.

The one subplot I didn't like so much was one about Nancy's clothes. Nancy still wore the precious '50s outfits she wore in the books, and in a movie set in modern times, she was made fun of for her outfits and overall sweet, competent persona. Nancy didn't wear those outfits to be quaint in the books; she was stylish for her time. If she was living in our times, she would be wearing modern clothes.

But anyway, I really enjoyed the movie, and I hope it inspires lots of future readers to enjoy this great series! I know my younger sister read one of the books for the first time in preparation for the movie, and she loved it and just checked 2 more out of the library!
Julie
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MattW
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie



JulieZ wrote:
I just saw the new Nancy Drew movie last night -- at Shankweiler's Drive-In Theater, the oldest existing drive-in in the country. I loved the books when I was younger, and I was worried that the movie would be a disappointment. However, I really enjoyed it, and the movie did a great job of staying faithful to the books. The movie was quite scary and suspenseful for a kid's movie, and it used many of the plot devices seen in the books. There was a bit of a subplot with boys (but no more than the books, where Ned was always tagging along but Nancy was in charge). I can remember my mom telling me to "Be like Nancy Drew," when I was little, and the Nancy of the movie was still a great role model for smart, responsible, confident girls.

The one subplot I didn't like so much was one about Nancy's clothes. Nancy still wore the precious '50s outfits she wore in the books, and in a movie set in modern times, she was made fun of for her outfits and overall sweet, competent persona. Nancy didn't wear those outfits to be quaint in the books; she was stylish for her time. If she was living in our times, she would be wearing modern clothes.

But anyway, I really enjoyed the movie, and I hope it inspires lots of future readers to enjoy this great series! I know my younger sister read one of the books for the first time in preparation for the movie, and she loved it and just checked 2 more out of the library!



Thanks for your comment on the movie, JulieZ. I haven't seen it yet but am looking forward to it. Has anyone else seen it? If so, what do you think?
Matt
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coreen222
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie



MattW wrote:
I hear you, Becke, about the Nancy Drew books losing their mystique. While I wasn't a ND fan, I was a Hardy Boys fan, and re-reading those books have had the same effect on me: I was a little sad when I tried to re-read them again because some of the luster had gone out. Then again, it's amazing to see a child discover a classic for the first time!

I'm not saying that ND falls into this, but it still stuns me how there are books that are made just for kids, while others are made for kids AND adults -- some kids' books 'wink over children's heads' so that adults can appreciate them on another level. I'm not sure whether I agree that's right, though. What do others think about that? Sometimes I see picture books out there that are so wordy, and I think, how in the world can a child read those words on his/her own? When they get old enough to read the words on their own, will they even be interested in that picture book anymore?




I think you have to consider that most picture books are meant to be read aloud to children who cannot yet read it themselves--with the exception of easy readers which are designed to help children read independently by using picture cues and limited text and vocabulary. Once children are old enough to read they usually are drawn to chapter books (which are shorter than novels, think Junie B. Jones, or the Magic Treehouse series.) And then eventually novels. Kids who are already reading chapter books might still enjoy the occasional read aloud picture book, I know teachers will still read aloud a picture book to children who are already reading. Usually they are nonfiction, or biographical, or historical in some way, but again, they are usually read aloud.
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tink45
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie

[ Edited ]


Message Edited by tink45 on 06-24-2007 01:39 PM
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MattW
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Re: Nancy Drew & the new movie



coreen222 wrote:


MattW wrote:
I hear you, Becke, about the Nancy Drew books losing their mystique. While I wasn't a ND fan, I was a Hardy Boys fan, and re-reading those books have had the same effect on me: I was a little sad when I tried to re-read them again because some of the luster had gone out. Then again, it's amazing to see a child discover a classic for the first time!

I'm not saying that ND falls into this, but it still stuns me how there are books that are made just for kids, while others are made for kids AND adults -- some kids' books 'wink over children's heads' so that adults can appreciate them on another level. I'm not sure whether I agree that's right, though. What do others think about that? Sometimes I see picture books out there that are so wordy, and I think, how in the world can a child read those words on his/her own? When they get old enough to read the words on their own, will they even be interested in that picture book anymore?




I think you have to consider that most picture books are meant to be read aloud to children who cannot yet read it themselves--with the exception of easy readers which are designed to help children read independently by using picture cues and limited text and vocabulary. Once children are old enough to read they usually are drawn to chapter books (which are shorter than novels, think Junie B. Jones, or the Magic Treehouse series.) And then eventually novels. Kids who are already reading chapter books might still enjoy the occasional read aloud picture book, I know teachers will still read aloud a picture book to children who are already reading. Usually they are nonfiction, or biographical, or historical in some way, but again, they are usually read aloud.



Thanks, this is good food for thought!
Matt
Teens Editor, B&N.com