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Inspired Scribe
carmen22
Posts: 988
Registered: ‎01-12-2009

Re: AUGUST FEATURE #3: The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks

 


Melhay wrote:

Okay, I am finally done with this book.  I do think with being the first book in the series it has more details of the people and places.  This book is 720 some pages and the next two I think are only 520 some pages.  Maybe they will go faster.

 

I noticed at one point the separation of the characters and the story of each of their events and happenings seemed to be long sections.  The story would stop on one character at a cliffhanger and jump to another, yet by the time the section was done with this second character I had completely forgot where the last character was left at and what was happening.

 

There were times in the book that I thought there was to much time spent on getting the details across.  Such as when Shea, Panamon, and Keltset where trailing Orl through the North.  For some reason to me this section seemed to be drawn out in the tracking.  I know they had to get through the darkness, the storm, and the trolls but the inbetween seemed long for me.

 

I have enjoyed the book for the largest portion of it.


 

That's exactly how I felt about the book. I found myself skimming over the drawn out portions of the chapters and getting to the good parts every time.  I think it has a lot to do with it being his first book and there was just so much detail he felt he needed to add, it seems. All in all though I really enjoyed the book too.
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"Bright colors, Vasher thought. I'll have to get used to those again. In any other nation, the vibrant blues and yellows would have been ridiculous on soldiers. This, however, was Hallandren: land of Returned gods, Lifeless servants, BioChromatic research, and - of course - color." Warbreaker By Brandon Sanderson
Inspired Scribe
carmen22
Posts: 988
Registered: ‎01-12-2009

Re: AUGUST FEATURE #3: The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks

[ Edited ]

 


Melhay wrote:

I just have to say I still love Menion.

 

He has proved himself to be a wonderous soldier many times over.  He was able to scare the you know what out of Stenmin ( think that was wonderful) and he was the one to end the mans life in the end.

 

Menion has learned a great deal with this journey of himself and who he is and should be.  Menion has also found a wonderful love in the midst of all this horrible mess, Shirl.  I do wonder how they will live their lives.  Even though her family are the kings of Callahorn Balinor is the king now.  She could leave to live with Menion in Leah, maybe.  We will have to see if in the next book they show up together or what happens.

 

But all in all the experience Menion has received in many areas will help him to be the wonderful king he is capable to be.  I just love him.


 

Yes, Menion was a great character and you seemed to sum him up fantastically. However, I think my favorite characters were Hendel and Flick! :smileyhappy:  I really like old Hendel and his love and respect for the crew. I was really sad when he passed away but he died a honorable death, as did the Troll Keltset. I thought it was exceptionally funny and brave when Hendel went to rescue Balinor and the elves and ended up getting stuck - I did NOT see that coming. LOL! Then I felt Flick grew as a character more than any of the others. I mean he was not this brave and daring person, but in the end he had courage enough to rescue the Elven King and forfeit his life instead of just running back to Allanon. 

 

 Your right, in the end I felt more of a connection with all the other characters more than I did for Shea. I also didn't feel as though Shea grew as much as the other characters did. They were all pretty good characters, though.

Message Edited by carmen22 on 08-17-2009 10:37 AM
_______________________
"Bright colors, Vasher thought. I'll have to get used to those again. In any other nation, the vibrant blues and yellows would have been ridiculous on soldiers. This, however, was Hallandren: land of Returned gods, Lifeless servants, BioChromatic research, and - of course - color." Warbreaker By Brandon Sanderson
Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: AUGUST FEATURE #3: The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks


Melhay wrote:

I do have a question just wondering what others think.

 

This book is about a boy/man who is destine to kill the Warlock Lord due to his heritage.  Don't you think he would be the main character of the book?  I feel the book centered more around the other characters more than the Valeman Shea.  I could be wrong but it seemed to me the poor boy who should have been able to fend for himself but was to shocked by events to do so should have learned a few more things on the trip.

 

I am not complaining, and I enjoyed the book.  I just thought it would center more around Shea when I started reading the book.

 

It does seem the real lesson learned here is to accept yourself and the truth.  What do you think the lesson to be learned in the book was?  Remember back on pg 287 the Druid Allanon thought, "He sensed that there was a lesson somewhere to be learned, but at the moment it eluded him."  Was this Brooks way of trying to teach us something through Fantasy?  Maybe on the scale of prejudice and politics or about ourselves.


 

I think with a quest story, often there is no one central character, because all of the participants have to work together in order to succeed.  Shea is one of the most important (except maybe Allanon), because he is, in a way, part of the weapon needed to defeat the Warlock Lord, so they need him.  But that doesn't mean that he has to do more throughout the journey than the others.  Actually, it is most important for the others to do what they can to protect him, so he really should probably not do very much, in case it puts him in danger.

 

He did grow, though, quite a bit, I think.  Once he was washed away from the others, he had to go on by himself and not give up.  I doubt that the boy who left Shady Vale would have been able to go on like that, so he must have learned something along the way.  He was lucky to find a couple of new protectors, in Panamon Creel and Keltset, for part of the way.  But in the end, he had to be the one to stand and defeat the Warlock Lord.  Even Allanon had not necessarily expected Shea to be strong enough to do that on his own - Allanon had planned to be there with Shea to guide him to use the Sword.  And yet, Shea used the Sword and saved the world!

 

Hmmm, I tend to not really think about deep meanings in books so much, but I think that your idea of accepting the truth about yourself is a good one.  Shea started out doubting himself a lot, not thinking that he could do what was needed, but in the end he exceeded everyone's expectations, including his own.  And I think that most of the others also didn't think much about his abilities, so that goes to your point about prejudice; they didn't expect much from a small human (kind of like Frodo!).

 

I guess it's a good thing that Shea was essentially a good person.  If he had not, he might have not been able to withstand what the Sword showed him.  Now, Panamon Creel, I think, would have failed!

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Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: AUGUST FEATURE #3: The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks


carmen22 wrote:

 


Melhay wrote:

I just have to say I still love Menion.

 

He has proved himself to be a wonderous soldier many times over.  He was able to scare the you know what out of Stenmin ( think that was wonderful) and he was the one to end the mans life in the end.

 

Menion has learned a great deal with this journey of himself and who he is and should be.  Menion has also found a wonderful love in the midst of all this horrible mess, Shirl.  I do wonder how they will live their lives.  Even though her family are the kings of Callahorn Balinor is the king now.  She could leave to live with Menion in Leah, maybe.  We will have to see if in the next book they show up together or what happens.

 

But all in all the experience Menion has received in many areas will help him to be the wonderful king he is capable to be.  I just love him.


 

Yes, Menion was a great character and you seemed to sum him up fantastically. However, I think my favorite characters were Hendel and Flick! :smileyhappy:  I really like old Hendel and his love and respect for the crew. I was really sad when he passed away but he died a honorable death, as did the Troll Keltset. I thought it was exceptionally funny and brave when Hendel went to rescue Balinor and the elves and ended up getting stuck - I did NOT see that coming. LOL! Then I felt Flick grew as a character more than any of the others. I mean he was not this brave and daring person, but in the end he had courage enough to rescue the Elven King and forfeit his life instead of just running back to Allanon. 

 

 Your right, in the end I felt more of a connection with all the other characters more than I did for Shea. I also didn't feel as though Shea grew as much as the other characters did. They were all pretty good characters, though.

Message Edited by carmen22 on 08-17-2009 10:37 AM

 

Well, I guess we all fell for Menion!  I have to admit to a certain fascination with Panamon Creel, too.  He is so mysterious, and red is my favorite color, so his dressing in red is in his favor!  At the end of the book, Shea and Flick were obviously bored with their old life and dying for another adventure, so they were so excited when Panamon showed up with the Elfstones!  And it was good to know, too, as a reader, that Panamon had survived, and that the Elfstones had not been lost.

 

This is probably a bit of a spoiler about the next book, but I had expected it to be about a new adventure that Panamon summoned Shea and Flick to, but it isn't.  It actually takes place about fifty years later.  Sorry for the spoiler, but I think it is a good thing to know right from the start.  I'm enjoying it, though!  I hope that eventually you get around to reading it.

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Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia