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paulgoatallen
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DECEMBER FEATURE #1: The Inexpicables by Cherie Priest

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
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paulgoatallen
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Registered: ‎08-16-2007

Re: DECEMBER FEATURE #1: The Inexpicables by Cherie Priest

[ Edited ]

 

 

 

Publishers Weekly review of The Inexplicables

Rector “Wreck ’Em” Sherman is an 18-year-old dealer of and addict to sap, a narcotic distilled from the poisonous gas that destroyed the walled-in city of Seattle. Six months after the events of Boneshaker (2009), Rector has no prospects and is haunted by the phantom of a boy he’s sure he sent to die. He finds his way into Seattle, inhabited now by zombies, criminals, and the Doornails, stubborn holdouts who have scraped out a tenuous existence in the ruins, and is quickly enmeshed in strangeness and trouble as people are stalked by a monstrous being, and out-of-town criminals try to take control of the city and the sap trade. Rector’s story is an old-fashioned boys’ adventure, and Priest’s alternate 1880 is as intriguing and enjoyable as ever, but the pacing is slack, and Rector is a more passive protagonist than the vibrant leads of her other three Clockwork Century books. Newcomers would be advised to begin at the beginning. Agent: Jennifer Jackson, the Donald Maass Agency. (Nov.)

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
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Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: DECEMBER FEATURE #1: The Inexpicables by Cherie Priest

Just a quick question for readers – are you currently interested, or have you ever been interested, in steampunk as a literary movement? If so, why? Do you think this literary trend is almost played out or does it still have limitless growth potential?

 


I very much enjoy reading the steampunk class.  But, there is a fine line here.  I've noticed there are many books classified as steampunk because there a one or two things that show up powered by steam.  That to me is not steampunk.  I want my steampunk to be full of a world run with steam, gears, and such.  The world rotates around it.  And there are many that don't.

 

I like a few steampunk books, but others to me use the name to try to get known.  I think if writers aren't careful, yes this fad will fade.  There seems to be only so much you can do with this creation.  Many are mystery settings in Victorian age.  It can get old after a while.

 

But for me, with the right authors and writing, I hope it's around for a long time. :smileyhappy: 

 

I like the creation of the steampunk, gears, and such.  I'm a huge magic fan and these mechanicals are a magic all their own.  I've read a few great retells and tales in which magic was substitued with gears and steam, and wow amazingly well done with the authors creations.  One such book is a short story...

Aladdin and His Wonderfully Infernal Device  

 

I loved reading this remake.  Well done by Tee Morris with substituing steam and gears for magic.

 

To me the steam and gear oriented setting is new, and the creations from the deeps depths of a creators mind can make anything in any way.  That's the magic here.  To have it in the proper setting and the perfect story, I think this could be loved and around for a long time.  But authors will have to watch as to me as a reader there seems to be books that don't fit the bill as closely as they should, but that's in all genre classifications as well.

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MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,173
Registered: ‎07-25-2011

Re: DECEMBER FEATURE #1: The Inexpicables by Cherie Priest

Just a quick question for readers – are you currently interested, or have you ever been interested, in steampunk as a literary movement? If so, why? Do you think this literary trend is almost played out or does it still have limitless growth potential?

 

For an opposing viewpoint:

I just don't really get it.  As an alternate history thought experiment, it's mildly interesting.  What if people like Babbage and Ada Byron had actually managed to achieve steam-powered mechanical computation?  I enjoyed The Difference Engine when it first came out, but unlike Gibson's other work (Neuromancer started a movement and deserved to) I don't see the need to spawn a genre from it.  I've read a number of stories and novellas in the magazines, and they're OK, but nothing that really grabs me.  I fail to see how the idea justifies a literary movement any more than some other alternate history premises like the Nazis winning WW2 or the Chinese settling America.

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Melhay
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Re: DECEMBER FEATURE #1: The Inexpicables by Cherie Priest

MacMcK, I see your side.  As I've not read the two authors/books mentioned I'm not sure about them.  

 

I like when the steampunk, gearpunk, or clockworks move away from Victorian age.  That's when the classification grows most for me.  When the author stands on their own creations and "magic" in the system they are creating.  Many of the stories seem to stick, or feel restricted, when in the Victorian age and not much growth is made in the class for me.

_______________________
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Melhay
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Re: DECEMBER FEATURE #1: The Inexpicables by Cherie Priest

Sometimes I see this classification of Steampunk, gearpunk, clockworks, and such (as there are different areas with it too) as a type of Science Fiction.  If authors let their imagination run wild with the potential of all these workings, it's a sort of Science Fiction tale - with gears and other ways of power other than computers.

 

As I mentioned in previous post, if the authors restrict themselves to one setting - Victorian Age - then the classification has sunk itself in the water like the lead metal weight it is.  I do like the Victorian Age setting, don't get me wrong, but yet it's one that could grow old if reading to many books one after another.

 

I like the setting of reading Meljean Brook's books.  I've only read the novella's (I need to get to the novels), but I like that there is more to her world than just some airships and steam machines.  She has created a world from the gears and steam.  This is an example of her using steampunk and gears to create her own Science Fiction setting....with romance mixed in. :smileyhappy:

The Iron Duke (Iron Seas Series #1)  

Riveted  

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
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paulgoatallen
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Registered: ‎08-16-2007

Re: DECEMBER FEATURE #1: The Inexpicables by Cherie Priest

Finally got to this one – and loved it. It got me to thinking though – about how the term steampunk is so misused. There is a kind of stigma associated with it as well. I know many readers who HATE steampunk but really haven't read any. Priest's Clockwork Century is what steampunk should be. Before judging steampunk, read this series.

 

My extended rambling is here:

 

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Explorations-The-BN-SciFi-and/Are-the-Glory-Days-of-Steampunk...

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky