Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Distinguished Wordsmith
crzynwrd4lf
Posts: 503
Registered: ‎04-04-2010
0 Kudos

Ender Saga's

I'm not much of a Science fiction buff, I love fantasy novels and series, but I picked up Ender's game because of the intriguing story line. Needless to say, the book sent a flurry of emotions through me and I quickly went and picked up Speaker for the Dead, Exenocide, and Children of the Mind.

 

These books have definitely shaped my perspective on life and have helped me to understand the human struggle both internally and externally and I believe that Card has done a phenomenal job explaining philosophy and using the Heirarchy of Foreigness to do this. Has anyone else used the HF in real life? At first, I didn't realize I was doing it, but when I did I found it very fascinating even when relating it to myself.

 

Also, I'm currently reading the Shadow Series with Bean. When I was reading the Ender Saga, I keep struggling with the curiosity of what had happened on Earth after the Formic Wars. I know they explain it in the Ender Saga, but I still wanted more detail about what happened to the battle school kids and I think Card has done a fantastic job in placating this curiosity.  Anyone else feel the same? disagree?

"One potato, two potato, three potato, four/ she's coming for you now, you better lock the door"-- Promise Not To Tell
Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007

Re: Ender Saga's

[ Edited ]

Well, you've definitely got discerning tastes, crzy!

 

Ender's Game won both the Hugo and the Nebula Award – as did Speaker for the Dead, which is absolutely amazing!

 

I actually enjoyed the Bean Quartet a little better than the original series – I just love Bean, though.... great character.

 

Paul

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Distinguished Wordsmith
crzynwrd4lf
Posts: 503
Registered: ‎04-04-2010

Re: Ender Saga's

Don't get me wrong I love the bean quartet and how Card always manages to fit everything together and he has one of the most unique story lines I've ever read. When I first read Ender's Game I was floored and adding to the shock value was how old the kids were. I mean what were you doing when you were ten, I certainly wasn't learning military tactics or even geometry for that matter!

 

Bean is definitely one of my favorite characters because he doesn't realize his own selflessness. Another character that I like but others probably won't agree with is Peter. In Ender's game he was portrayed as a monster bent on conquering the world. By the time I read Children of the Mind, even though it was Ender's Aiua, i had a soft spot for him. I think it's because Ender was always characterized as both Peter and Valentine's strongest attributes which created an internal conflict for Ender but once he let his whole aiua go to 'Peter' the conflict ended and 'Peter' actually became Peter.

 

Sounds confusing I know, but once I started reading the Bean quartet I could see the resemblance between the two. There are some attributes of Peter that conflict with 'Peter' but the overall nature I think is the same. Agree? Disagree?

"One potato, two potato, three potato, four/ she's coming for you now, you better lock the door"-- Promise Not To Tell
Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Ender Saga's

 

crzynwrd4lf wrote:

Don't get me wrong I love the bean quartet and how Card always manages to fit everything together and he has one of the most unique story lines I've ever read. When I first read Ender's Game I was floored and adding to the shock value was how old the kids were. I mean what were you doing when you were ten, I certainly wasn't learning military tactics or even geometry for that matter!

 

Bean is definitely one of my favorite characters because he doesn't realize his own selflessness. Another character that I like but others probably won't agree with is Peter. In Ender's game he was portrayed as a monster bent on conquering the world. By the time I read Children of the Mind, even though it was Ender's Aiua, i had a soft spot for him. I think it's because Ender was always characterized as both Peter and Valentine's strongest attributes which created an internal conflict for Ender but once he let his whole aiua go to 'Peter' the conflict ended and 'Peter' actually became Peter.

 

Sounds confusing I know, but once I started reading the Bean quartet I could see the resemblance between the two. There are some attributes of Peter that conflict with 'Peter' but the overall nature I think is the same. Agree? Disagree?

 

 

Agree. Absolutely. That was one of OSC's genius moves in writing an entire story from another perspective.. brilliant stuff.

 

Paul

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky