Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Rest of the book and appendices

 

NKJemisin wrote:

 

Nadine wrote:

When you are ready we might as well move on to what we have all been waiting for. After we are finished being astonished and/or congratulating ourselves on our cleverness, lets put in some predictions for the next two books. Nora has provided the first chapter of the second book, The Broken Kingdom, in the appendix and has told us the Sieh is the narrator for the third, so that should get our imaginations going.

 

Hey, Nora what is the title of the third book?

 

 

The Broken Kingdoms.  I've seen the preliminary cover, BTW, and it's already fantastic (though it will change somewhat from what I've seen).  :smileyhappy:

 

Nora

 

No public peek yet? :smileywink:

 

 

And I read on your blog that you have to proof read it as well before you leave. We don't want to hold you up on that!

 

Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

Well, I couldn't contain myself last night... I finished the book!  :smileyhappy:  I am ready to do any and all discussions of the book and potential future story lines.  I want to go back through my questions and make sure I got all my answers, and to think on what is to come as well.

 

You all are not going to be able to put the book down until your done! :smileywink:

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

Melhay wrote:

Melhay wrote:

I am still a little out there on Kinneths death/murder.  I am not sure how did this or why.

 

What were the facts in Kinneths death?

 

She was poisoned.  There is a puncture on the scar of her sigil.  She died in her sleep. (page 48)

 

But I think somewhere later Yeine mentions she lays in bed crying as she died.

 

But I can go back and forth on either Dakarta or the Enefadeh as killing Kinneth.

 

Dakarta could have many motives.

1) He loved his daughter so much. Maybe he could not put her through what her mother did, to pass the sigil on to the next.  Or maybe he new she would NOT have choosen the next king and set the Enefadeh free.  Kinneth did tell the Enefadeh she would help release them in order to get released from the sigil.

 

2) He disowned her and did not want her to take the king/queen position.

 

I had thought it was the Enefadeh but not to sure now.

1) To get Yeine back to Sky and release them.  Although Kinneth said she would release them, but maybe she wasn't as trustworthy as thought at one time.  Being she tried to kill Yeine at birth and maybe didn't want to release them, but to change things in a different way.

 

 

The poison!  I thought the Enefadeh where the ones who used it, but now I am leading to an Arameri.  Itempas Bright was the one to use the poison on Enefa and got it from one of the children.  So he would be the only one to get the poison.  So the Arameri (highblood family) may have access to this poison.  Through Viraine who knows the knowledge of the gods, and can read their language.

 

Okay, Maybe Viraine is the murderer!

Also, the points are stacking up against Viraine.  He watches all the messages and all people coming in and out of Sky.  Along with all the magic used.  He really has his fingers in everything that goes on.  Could he have known Kinneth was communicated outside of Sky and with the Enefadeh?  I think maybe so.  And when she came and left Viraine saw her, and he was to have been sent away like all the others.

 

I am starting to think Viraine is closer to Bright Itempas than the King is.  Strange thought, but could Viraine be Itempas?  The gods can change their appearances as they want.  That is just way off the wall, but with everything he does and has his fingers in, maybe he is the closest to Itempas than we had suspected.

 

pg 284:

"Hmm. What else is Viraine in charge of, here?"

"Magic use," Sieh said, ticking off fingers. "Everything from the routine to, well, us. Information dissemination -- he's Dekarta's liaison to the Itempan Order. He oversees all important ceremonies and rituals..."

 

We know he deals with everything communical and magic wise he catches and knows happens.  As he knew when Yeine had left with Nightlord those two times.

Okay, if you are not done with the book DON'T READ this!!!

 

 

 

 

 

I have bolded above a thought I had, which I had thought was crazy, And it ended up true!  What are the odds?  I was surprised that I had mentioned this one and it was so!  I had to say I loved the way it played out though.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
0 Kudos

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

Well,

Some of us had to go back to work. Dang it!

Luanne

 

 

Melhay wrote:

Well, I couldn't contain myself last night... I finished the book!  :smileyhappy:  I am ready to do any and all discussions of the book and potential future story lines.  I want to go back through my questions and make sure I got all my answers, and to think on what is to come as well.

 

You all are not going to be able to put the book down until your done! :smileywink:

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

 

Melhay wrote:

Melhay wrote:

Melhay wrote:

I am still a little out there on Kinneths death/murder.  I am not sure how did this or why.

 

What were the facts in Kinneths death?

 

She was poisoned.  There is a puncture on the scar of her sigil.  She died in her sleep. (page 48)

 

But I think somewhere later Yeine mentions she lays in bed crying as she died.

 

But I can go back and forth on either Dakarta or the Enefadeh as killing Kinneth.

 

Dakarta could have many motives.

1) He loved his daughter so much. Maybe he could not put her through what her mother did, to pass the sigil on to the next.  Or maybe he new she would NOT have choosen the next king and set the Enefadeh free.  Kinneth did tell the Enefadeh she would help release them in order to get released from the sigil.

 

2) He disowned her and did not want her to take the king/queen position.

 

I had thought it was the Enefadeh but not to sure now.

1) To get Yeine back to Sky and release them.  Although Kinneth said she would release them, but maybe she wasn't as trustworthy as thought at one time.  Being she tried to kill Yeine at birth and maybe didn't want to release them, but to change things in a different way.

 

 

The poison!  I thought the Enefadeh where the ones who used it, but now I am leading to an Arameri.  Itempas Bright was the one to use the poison on Enefa and got it from one of the children.  So he would be the only one to get the poison.  So the Arameri (highblood family) may have access to this poison.  Through Viraine who knows the knowledge of the gods, and can read their language.

 

Okay, Maybe Viraine is the murderer!

Also, the points are stacking up against Viraine.  He watches all the messages and all people coming in and out of Sky.  Along with all the magic used.  He really has his fingers in everything that goes on.  Could he have known Kinneth was communicated outside of Sky and with the Enefadeh?  I think maybe so.  And when she came and left Viraine saw her, and he was to have been sent away like all the others.

 

I am starting to think Viraine is closer to Bright Itempas than the King is.  Strange thought, but could Viraine be Itempas?  The gods can change their appearances as they want.  That is just way off the wall, but with everything he does and has his fingers in, maybe he is the closest to Itempas than we had suspected.

 

pg 284:

"Hmm. What else is Viraine in charge of, here?"

"Magic use," Sieh said, ticking off fingers. "Everything from the routine to, well, us. Information dissemination -- he's Dekarta's liaison to the Itempan Order. He oversees all important ceremonies and rituals..."

 

We know he deals with everything communical and magic wise he catches and knows happens.  As he knew when Yeine had left with Nightlord those two times.

Okay, if you are not done with the book DON'T READ this!!!

 

 

 

 

 

I have bolded above a thought I had, which I had thought was crazy, And it ended up true!  What are the odds?  I was surprised that I had mentioned this one and it was so!  I had to say I loved the way it played out though.

 

 

Very good call Melissa!

 

A lot of surprises. I'll be back a bit later with my comments.

Contributor
ScribbledNotes
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎02-28-2010

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

Good job, Melissa. I have to admit that although I figured that Itempas would show up at the end, I certainly didn't expect an appearance like that.

 

What a great ending! I never pictured Kurue as the killer of Yeine's mother and I certainly never expected her to act the way that she did at the top of the spire. But what I loved most about the ending was that it was efficient and exciting, and it had such great images. I mean, the glass enclosed room at dawn conjured up such an ethereal picture in my head. All in all, a clever and entertaining end.

 

I did have one question, but it's certainly not anything huge. Remember when Yeine overhead T'vril talking with a servant about "waiting for the signal" or something? Did this ever play out? I wondered if he was talking about the celebration for the servants that happened in the middle of the novel, but I can't remember whether this part fo the book ever came to fruition. Did I miss something?

 

And thanks Nadine for you compliments on my posting. I'm just glad that I can keep up with all of you more established posters!

 

Brandon

"Preserve your memories, they're all that's left you."
Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

ScribbledNotes wrote:

Good job, Melissa. I have to admit that although I figured that Itempas would show up at the end, I certainly didn't expect an appearance like that.

 

What a great ending! I never pictured Kurue as the killer of Yeine's mother and I certainly never expected her to act the way that she did at the top of the spire. But what I loved most about the ending was that it was efficient and exciting, and it had such great images. I mean, the glass enclosed room at dawn conjured up such an ethereal picture in my head. All in all, a clever and entertaining end.

 

I did have one question, but it's certainly not anything huge. Remember when Yeine overhead T'vril talking with a servant about "waiting for the signal" or something? Did this ever play out? I wondered if he was talking about the celebration for the servants that happened in the middle of the novel, but I can't remember whether this part fo the book ever came to fruition. Did I miss something?

 

And thanks Nadine for you compliments on my posting. I'm just glad that I can keep up with all of you more established posters!

 

Brandon

 

Thank you Brandon!

 

I was surprised yet I wasn't of Kurue.  I didn't really get why we didn't see much of her and thought there was something wrong there.  Also, I saw the connection between Bright Itempas and the poison and just figured it was the Enefadeh who were who poisoned Yeines mother.  But I couldn't figure out why they would do it with what they were trying to do.  I kind of thought maybe it was so they could get Yeine to Sky.  I was a little off on that one.

 

On T'vril and what he was talking to the servants.

On page 304 Yeine realizes what he was talking to the servants about.  I believe it was an evacuation routine in case something went array with the Earth Stone being delivered to the room and with the gods being present.

"Immediately after the ball, the Stone of Earth will be sent through the palace's central shaft to the ritual chamber, in the solarium spire."

"Ah. I heard you warning the servants about this last week."

T'vril turned the clipboard in his fingers gently, not looking at me/ "Yes/ A fleeting exposure supposedly does no harm, but..." He shrugged. "It's a thing of the gods. Best to stay away."

 

On page 397 Yeine, the goddess, is now talking with her grandfather.  I think she is able to see, or know things that are happening around.  I don't know if this realy shows anything to do with the plan, maybe more of his qualities to take charge and be the next heir.

I smiled to myself, seeing without eyes through the layers of Sky.  Within, the palace was not so very different.  Bark and branches had replaced the pearly Skystuff in places, and some of the dead spaces had been filled with living wood.  But even this simple change was enough to terrify the denizens of Sky, highblood and low alike.  At the heart of the chaos was T'vril, marshaling the palace's servants and organizing an evacuation.

 

I think he was trying to get his people away from where the gods and the Stone of Earth are when the stone is transported there.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

I finished The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (Inheritance Trilogy Series) yesterday and felt the need to comment on the book. It was a engrossing read which kept me up half the night. The narrative voice of the protagonist, Yeine Darr, was compelling., The mythology and related world building were impressive. And, the plot was convoluted, intriguing and satisfying. Nonetheless, I did have some reservations which concerned the mythology created within the book and the character of the protagonist.

 

In regard to the mythos, a female deity or form has been worshiped since pre-historic times as the creator of life/fertility. (The rotund stone statues of obviously pregnant females attest to this long-held myth.) On the other hand, archeologists have not found male figures as deities until the rise of the first civilization in ancient Sumer. It has been surmised that there were no male deities until hunter-gatherer groups of humans settled and organized themselves under the rule of physically stronger males. Essentially, male dominance equalled male deities. Eventually, the monotheistic male god figure came to predominant.

 

As applied to the book, it predictably casts the female god as the deity of life/balance while simultaneously acknowledging the predominance of the male god, by having two male gods to the one female and by casting a male god, Nahadoth, as the first and oldest god. Note, it's not that I object to this mythology, it's just that I crave a book which creates a mythos that doesn't pay tribute to the predominance of the male diety and/or doesn't predictably cast a female deity in the role of the goddess of life/fertility.

 

With respect to the character of Yeine, she just wasn't quite as conflicted or nuanced as I believe most individuals are. Note, she was quite compelling and engaging, but her thoughts and actions seemed too scripted and directed (and not what a real 19 year old girl would experience in her place). Further, when she ascends to godhood, she's just seemed too blase, remote and competent. She's a 19 year old girl, not an millenniums old deity. In short, her transformation just seem too easy and a bit artificial to me.  

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

Good call Melhay. I did not see that.

I was not happy when Yeine was killed. I am glad she is a god, not quite what I had thought.

The whole end was good. I hated to stop because I had to go back to work.

Then I got home and had to go celebrate. But it was worth waiting to read the very end.

Good book. Luanne

 

Melhay wrote:

I am starting to think Viraine is closer to Bright Itempas than the King is.  Strange thought, but could Viraine be Itempas?  The gods can change their appearances as they want.  That is just way off the wall, but with everything he does and has his fingers in, maybe he is the closest to Itempas than we had suspected.

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

I had Kurue in my list of important characters, but I did not picture her role in the book to be that way in the end. I am curious about how Kurue will be if she is in the next book.

I agree with you on the ending. Luanne

 

 

ScribbledNotes wrote:

Good job, Melissa. I have to admit that although I figured that Itempas would show up at the end, I certainly didn't expect an appearance like that.

 

What a great ending! I never pictured Kurue as the killer of Yeine's mother and I certainly never expected her to act the way that she did at the top of the spire. But what I loved most about the ending was that it was efficient and exciting, and it had such great images. I mean, the glass enclosed room at dawn conjured up such an ethereal picture in my head. All in all, a clever and entertaining end.

 

I did have one question, but it's certainly not anything huge. Remember when Yeine overhead T'vril talking with a servant about "waiting for the signal" or something? Did this ever play out? I wondered if he was talking about the celebration for the servants that happened in the middle of the novel, but I can't remember whether this part fo the book ever came to fruition. Did I miss something?

 

And thanks Nadine for you compliments on my posting. I'm just glad that I can keep up with all of you more established posters!

 

Brandon

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

Ok, I have to admit I was totally surprised with the ending. I would never have been able to guess it.

 

I knew Viraine had to be important because of where Nora listed him but I never figured whe would be housing Itempas.

 

I thought T'vil might have ended up with a more active role in the end but he just became the defacto non-king. I wonder if his role might be continued into the future books. But more on that when we get to The Broken Kingdom predictions.

 

I figured Kurue, being the wise, would have some part in all of this but never figured her for her final part in all of this. I think I'm going to have to go back and read that library scene again. I don't fully understand this idea of gods dying but they don't seem to stay dead long. More on this a bit later as well.

 

I didn't expect either Yeine or, in her own way (?),  Enefa "dying". Is Enefa gone or merely merged with Yeine? On Yeine, I would kind of now want to reread the first few chapters, to see what clues we had there.

 

OK, Kinneth still has me wondering. There is an implication that Kinneth had planned this. Page 396 Dekarta says: "Ah, Kinneth never did things by half measures did she?"

 

I love the poetic justice of Scimina's fate.

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

 

dalnewt wrote:

I finished The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (Inheritance Trilogy Series) yesterday and felt the need to comment on the book. It was a engrossing read which kept me up half the night. The narrative voice of the protagonist, Yeine Darr, was compelling., The mythology and related world building were impressive. And, the plot was convoluted, intriguing and satisfying. Nonetheless, I did have some reservations which concerned the mythology created within the book and the character of the protagonist.

 

In regard to the mythos, a female deity or form has been worshiped since pre-historic times as the creator of life/fertility. (The rotund stone statues of obviously pregnant females attest to this long-held myth.) On the other hand, archeologists have not found male figures as deities until the rise of the first civilization in ancient Sumer. It has been surmised that there were no male deities until hunter-gatherer groups of humans settled and organized themselves under the rule of physically stronger males. Essentially, male dominance equalled male deities. Eventually, the monotheistic male god figure came to predominant.

 

As applied to the book, it predictably casts the female god as the deity of life/balance while simultaneously acknowledging the predominance of the male god, by having two male gods to the one female and by casting a male god, Nahadoth, as the first and oldest god. Note, it's not that I object to this mythology, it's just that I crave a book which creates a mythos that doesn't pay tribute to the predominance of the male diety and/or doesn't predictably cast a female deity in the role of the goddess of life/fertility.

 

With respect to the character of Yeine, she just wasn't quite as conflicted or nuanced as I believe most individuals are. Note, she was quite compelling and engaging, but her thoughts and actions seemed too scripted and directed (and not what a real 19 year old girl would experience in her place). Further, when she ascends to godhood, she's just seemed too blase, remote and competent. She's a 19 year old girl, not an millenniums old deity. In short, her transformation just seem too easy and a bit artificial to me.  

 

I felt she adjusted rather quickly myself to some incredible changes. But there seems to be some implication here that there was more to Yeine than apparent. Like she was bred for this role.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

I am too, Luanne, and Kurue dying seemed too simple. I too have a feeling we may see more of her later. I will post my thoughts when we get to The Broken Kingdom discussion.

 

 

pen21 wrote:

I had Kurue in my list of important characters, but I did not picture her role in the book to be that way in the end. I am curious about how Kurue will be if she is in the next book.

I agree with you on the ending. Luanne

 

 

ScribbledNotes wrote:

Good job, Melissa. I have to admit that although I figured that Itempas would show up at the end, I certainly didn't expect an appearance like that.

 

What a great ending! I never pictured Kurue as the killer of Yeine's mother and I certainly never expected her to act the way that she did at the top of the spire. But what I loved most about the ending was that it was efficient and exciting, and it had such great images. I mean, the glass enclosed room at dawn conjured up such an ethereal picture in my head. All in all, a clever and entertaining end.

 

I did have one question, but it's certainly not anything huge. Remember when Yeine overhead T'vril talking with a servant about "waiting for the signal" or something? Did this ever play out? I wondered if he was talking about the celebration for the servants that happened in the middle of the novel, but I can't remember whether this part fo the book ever came to fruition. Did I miss something?

 

And thanks Nadine for you compliments on my posting. I'm just glad that I can keep up with all of you more established posters!

 

Brandon

 

 

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

The Broken Kingdom

I thought I might set up a different header for any of our forward speculations. That way we can pull them all forward when that book comes out.

 

Have any of you read the sample chapter to The Broken Kingdom at the back of our book?

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

Now there are a few unresolved things for me. But this is only the first book in a trilogy. One is the Chaos chapter dream. That has got to have some purpose. Did it happen in the past, will it happen in the future, will Yeine become part of some other mortal, or was it just a dream to establish the cruelty of the Arameri.

 

The altarskirt rose. Yeine makes a point of saying this is important. Page 3:

 

"There is a rose that is famous in the High North. (This is not a digression.) It is called the alterskirt rose. Not only do its petals unfold in a radiance of pearled white, but frequently it grows an incomplete secondary flower about the base of its stem. In its most prized form, the altarskirt grows a layer of overlarge petals that drape the ground. The two bloom in tandem, seedbearing head and skirt, glory above and below."

 

It is also in the glossary so it has to have some relevance. My only thought is that it represented the kind of symbiotic relationship between Yeine and Enefa and Viraine and Itempas. But I'm not sure. I don't think it comes up again in the book.

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

I have some questions for Nora pertaining just to this book.

 

In the original writing of this book, did it have this ending? I definitely agree, the first person approach you took was the best way to tell this story with this ending.

 

What was the mythological basis for the ending of the book? Were you inspired by a particular story or mythology or did it just come out of the mythological soup in your brain?

 

What was the original inspiration that started you on the storyline for this book? Did your original plan invision just this book or the whole trilogy?

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006

Re: The Broken Kingdom

[ Edited ]

I thought I would start looking at some things that we know about the next book.

 

In her interview in the back, Nora makes some statements about what will be in the next book.

 

1. "In book two, you'll learn what becomes of Itempas after his fall from power."

 

2. "what caused him to turn on his fellow gods at the start of the Gods' War.

 

3 "In book two, I want to focus on the ordinary people of this world .

 

4. "how they cope when giant trees obscure the sky"

 

5. "the corner grocer might be a godling in disguise."

 

6. "The story will focus on a young blindwoman who finds a homeless man in her trash heap one morning--glowing like the rising sun."

 

7. :smileyfrustrated:he takes him in and this simple act of kindness lands her in the middle of a conspiracy to destroy the gods."

 

8. "Many characters from the first book will put in an appearance"

Contributor
ScribbledNotes
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎02-28-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

 

Melhay wrote:

On T'vril and what he was talking to the servants.

On page 304 Yeine realizes what he was talking to the servants about.  I believe it was an evacuation routine in case something went array with the Earth Stone being delivered to the room and with the gods being present.

"Immediately after the ball, the Stone of Earth will be sent through the palace's central shaft to the ritual chamber, in the solarium spire."

"Ah. I heard you warning the servants about this last week."

T'vril turned the clipboard in his fingers gently, not looking at me/ "Yes/ A fleeting exposure supposedly does no harm, but..." He shrugged. "It's a thing of the gods. Best to stay away."

 

On page 397 Yeine, the goddess, is now talking with her grandfather.  I think she is able to see, or know things that are happening around.  I don't know if this realy shows anything to do with the plan, maybe more of his qualities to take charge and be the next heir.

I smiled to myself, seeing without eyes through the layers of Sky.  Within, the palace was not so very different.  Bark and branches had replaced the pearly Skystuff in places, and some of the dead spaces had been filled with living wood.  But even this simple change was enough to terrify the denizens of Sky, highblood and low alike.  At the heart of the chaos was T'vril, marshaling the palace's servants and organizing an evacuation.

 

I think he was trying to get his people away from where the gods and the Stone of Earth are when the stone is transported there.

 

 

Wow, I'm surprised that I couldn't remember this. I knew I must have read it somewhere but I justcouldn;t place it. Thanks for letting me know!

 

Brandon

"Preserve your memories, they're all that's left you."
Contributor
ScribbledNotes
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎02-28-2010

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

 

dalnewt wrote:

I finished The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (Inheritance Trilogy Series) yesterday and felt the need to comment on the book. It was a engrossing read which kept me up half the night. The narrative voice of the protagonist, Yeine Darr, was compelling., The mythology and related world building were impressive. And, the plot was convoluted, intriguing and satisfying. Nonetheless, I did have some reservations which concerned the mythology created within the book and the character of the protagonist.

 

In regard to the mythos, a female deity or form has been worshiped since pre-historic times as the creator of life/fertility. (The rotund stone statues of obviously pregnant females attest to this long-held myth.) On the other hand, archeologists have not found male figures as deities until the rise of the first civilization in ancient Sumer. It has been surmised that there were no male deities until hunter-gatherer groups of humans settled and organized themselves under the rule of physically stronger males. Essentially, male dominance equalled male deities. Eventually, the monotheistic male god figure came to predominant.

 

As applied to the book, it predictably casts the female god as the deity of life/balance while simultaneously acknowledging the predominance of the male god, by having two male gods to the one female and by casting a male god, Nahadoth, as the first and oldest god. Note, it's not that I object to this mythology, it's just that I crave a book which creates a mythos that doesn't pay tribute to the predominance of the male diety and/or doesn't predictably cast a female deity in the role of the goddess of life/fertility.

 

With respect to the character of Yeine, she just wasn't quite as conflicted or nuanced as I believe most individuals are. Note, she was quite compelling and engaging, but her thoughts and actions seemed too scripted and directed (and not what a real 19 year old girl would experience in her place). Further, when she ascends to godhood, she's just seemed too blase, remote and competent. She's a 19 year old girl, not an millenniums old deity. In short, her transformation just seem too easy and a bit artificial to me.  

 

 

Hmmm...I also did think that the ending of the books moved faster than I expected, but I don;t think it hurt the book. It seemed to me at the end, that while Yeine achieved godhood, part of her was still Enefa. I think that Enefa and Yeine combined to form a new separate god-entity, which would explain her slightly different demeanor post-transformation.

 

I would like to respectfully disagree with your comment about the male/female deity portrayal. I think that there was a part of the book in which one of the Enefadeh reminded Yeine that Enefa also did plenty of destroying as well as life-giving. And I actually thought that the portrayal of Itempas and the larger relationship between the Three demonstrated the flaws and evils that can result from a single-god dominated system of living. Itempas' tyranny is shown to be very wrong, in my opinion. I actually think that  the gender of the gods had little to do with the major themes of the book. But that;s just my opinion as well.

 

Brandon

"Preserve your memories, they're all that's left you."
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

[ Edited ]

Brandon Wrote:

Hmmm...I also did think that the ending of the books moved faster than I expected, but I don;t think it hurt the book. It seemed to me at the end, that while Yeine achieved godhood, part of her was still Enefa. I think that Enefa and Yeine combined to form a new separate god-entity, which would explain her slightly different demeanor post-transformation.

---------------------------------------------------------

 

I'm a bit fuzzy on this but I'm inclined to go along with your thinking, Brandon. Whether true or not, I like the idea of Yeine and Enefa forming a new god person. This is especially true since Yeine not only moved up to godhood fast but also seems to be the top dog god. It was she who made most of the final decisions and the rest of the gods (and humans) followed her decisions.

 

I am still wondering who was Yeine's father. And if this final transference was part of Kinneth plan.

---------------------------------

 

I would like to respectfully disagree with your comment about the male/female deity portrayal. I think that there was a part of the book in which one of the Enefadeh reminded Yeine that Enefa also did plenty of destroying as well as life-giving. And I actually thought that the portrayal of Itempas and the larger relationship between the Three demonstrated the flaws and evils that can result from a single-god dominated system of living. Itempas' tyranny is shown to be very wrong, in my opinion. I actually think that  the gender of the gods had little to do with the major themes of the book. But that;s just my opinion as well.

 

Brandon

-------------------------------

 

I agree, I don't think the gender of the gods was that important except that Nahadoth's maleness was a prominent feature. My feeling, though, was in Nora's mythology these gods really had no particular form in their natural state. The Maelstrom certainly had no form.  But the gods were kind of locked into a semi-mortal state where they did take on a gender appearance. But even within their mortal cages they did change ages and shapes.

 

There is no right or wrong way to depict gods in a mythology--each people create their unique mythology to fit their needs and explain their universe. Creating them male and female is one way people can relate to the gods. It need not follow an historic precidence or logic. That is why a left-brained Leo like me has a hard time wraping my mind around some of this stuff. You almost have to sense it rather than understand it.

 

Maybe when Nora gets back she can comment on all of this. Maybe I will look around and see if she blogged on any of it.