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Author
NKJemisin
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎02-18-2010

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

 

Nadine wrote:
Itempas manifested fully during the Ritual of the Succession.  Before that, Viraine was himself at times and Itempas at times -- much like Nahadoth/Naha and Enefa/Yeine.

---------------------------------------------------

 

Now this caught my eye.  I assumed Naha was kind of a nickname. Did these two names represent his dual personality. And what about Zhakkarn/Zhakka?

 

 

 

 

"Naha" is both the other gods' nickname for Nahadoth (all of them have nicknames for each other, which is mostly Sieh's doing) and Yeine's attempt to differentiate between Nahadoth and his daytime form.  Nahadoth and his daytime form are extreme examples of the dual nature of gods; so are Itempas and Viraine, and Enefa/Yeine.  All these pairs actually consist of separate beings, each with their own personality and soul.  (Which is why Yeine was able to "fission off" Naha from Nahadoth at the end.  You'll see him later in the series, too. :smileywink: 

 

The dichotomy is only symbolic in the case of the godlings.  "Zhakka" is just a nickname, but it's also meant to show that she has a soft side, like a protective big sister (even though she's actually much younger than Sieh).  We never really see her true nature, though it's hinted at in the scene at the Pier, and described explicitly in the Appendices -- she is the embodiment of an army, and can transform herself into one at will.  Kurue's nickname is never mentioned -- she hates it -- though Sieh uses it to torment her whenever he can, and it's also symbolic:  Rue.  As in, regret.

 

Sieh has no nickname -- or in essence, his name is a permanent nickname.  People usually treat him in a friendly/familiar way, because of his appearance.  He works very hard to cultivate that.

 

Nora

Author
NKJemisin
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎02-18-2010

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

 

pen21 wrote:

Nora,

After reading our posts with our thoughts and predictions, what are the biggest surprises?

What prediction or assumption made you laugh out loud, spit out your coffee?

What post had a key element of the story identified earlier than you thought we would?

Just off the top of your head. No need to read through all the posts.

Thanks Luanne

 

 

There's too many to name, really.  All the speculations you guys tossed out were interesting, even when they were way off, but mostly I loved the fact that the story made you speculate so much.  I usually worry about being too predictable, but AFAICT most of you did not guess the ending in advance.  So I'm happy. :smileyhappy:

 

Nora

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

Nora,

Sorry you were frustrated with not being able to reply.

I was only online in the morning, then everything died. It was a bad day for all.

 

I am glad we entertained you. This is a fun group. I like the speculation, even when I am horribly wrong. I like being surprised by a book and its ending. Job well done.

Luanne

 

 

NKJemisin wrote:

 

pen21 wrote:

Nora,

After reading our posts with our thoughts and predictions, what are the biggest surprises?

What prediction or assumption made you laugh out loud, spit out your coffee?

What post had a key element of the story identified earlier than you thought we would?

Just off the top of your head. No need to read through all the posts.

Thanks Luanne

 

 

There's too many to name, really.  All the speculations you guys tossed out were interesting, even when they were way off, but mostly I loved the fact that the story made you speculate so much.  I usually worry about being too predictable, but AFAICT most of you did not guess the ending in advance.  So I'm happy. :smileyhappy:

 

Nora

 

 

Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007
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Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

WOW. Finally! I haven't been able to sign on since Sunday!!!!

 

Paul

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Frequent Contributor
Liago
Posts: 31
Registered: ‎11-13-2008

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

Same here sorry I wasn't able to join in more but the login here is so unpredictable so I just end up reading along :smileyhappy:

 

I enjoyed the way everything turned out and am looking forward to the next books. It will be interesting to see how Itempas deals with his punishment. Especially since he hates change so much we get a glimps of him being suicildal at the end but will he get over this and try and cause some sort of chaos in the world? This would be interesting since chaos is sort of his opposite.

 

Question for Nora, with the next books encompasing more of your world, will we see any sort of maps in them or will you leave the "vision" of the landscapes up to our minds?

Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008
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Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

Nelsmom wrote:

I just finished the book.  I had to read it in a hurry because I could only have it for a week.  I really enjoyed the book.  I know that I am going to have to reread it when it is not such a hot book.  I especially liked how Yeine learned about herself and her dual nature.  Also at the end she was able to still be herself even as a new goddess.  I am really interested to read the Broken Kingdom and see life as the less privilaged see the world and Gods.  Nora thank you for writing such an interesting book.

 

Toni

 

Okay, what a duzzy to get logged in here.  I am in for now... see if I can get back in later.

 

Everyone has been very busy here! I don't even know what to say.  Ha ha! You all have me speechless.  Never thought that would happen, huh!?!?

 

Toni, I am glad you enjoyed the book.  Sorry you had such a short time to read it.  There is but there isn't a lot to take in, in reading this.   I am really curious to see where Broken Kingdom will go after reading the sample chapter in the end of the book.  It seems as we are going to see through some other girls eyes.  I am curious as to how she is.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Broken Kingdom

pen21 wrote:

This part of your post made me curious as to how Scimina killed Relad.

I also remember reading that the sigil kept the family from killing each other.

During the ceremony was this allowed?

Luanne

 

Melhay wrote:

Now I have a question.  Will the new heir have any power?  There is nothing there to control.  The sigil had other relatively helpful things, as it kept the family from killing each other.  Remember Scimina spoke of this when she was torturing Sieh, that Yeine could not kill her with her knife.  Now the sigil was given by Itempas, so maybe it has no power anymore.  Just curious...

 

You know Luanne I am glad you caught this.  I knew Scimina killed Relad, but didn't put the two together with the sigil and keeping them from killing each other.  Wonder if it has to do with Yeine taking the Earth Stone into her.  Then that would mean there is no power to be had by the Heir or Aramari.  Right?

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: The Broken Kingdom

Melhay,

Nora answered this.

I have pasted Nora's response her.

Luanne

 

 

Argh!  Tried to respond to this twice yesterday, and the "reply" buttons wouldn't work.

 

Going to double-answer here, for Pen21 and Melhay.  First off, yes, the sigils were deactivated for the duration of the ceremony.  Since the ceremony normally ends with the ritual murder of one of the heirs (often when the winning heir orders Nahadoth to kill the loser), the sigil protections are eliminated.  This was what Viraine was doing when he caused each Arameri's sigil to flare white.  (He also put a restriction on Nahadoth when he made a white symbol appear on his head, because without the sigils Nahadoth would ordinarily have been free to kill everyone in the room.)

 

As for the new heir having power -- yes.  Plenty.  As Yeine points out, the Arameri still have insane amounts of wealth, political power, an army (though not much of one, since they've rarely needed it before now), and both the magical power (scriveners) and "propaganda power" of the Order of Itempas.  However, they're no longer invulnerable, which will play a role in coming books.

 

Nora

 

 

Melhay wrote:

pen21 wrote:

This part of your post made me curious as to how Scimina killed Relad.

I also remember reading that the sigil kept the family from killing each other.

During the ceremony was this allowed?

Luanne

 

Melhay wrote:

Now I have a question.  Will the new heir have any power?  There is nothing there to control.  The sigil had other relatively helpful things, as it kept the family from killing each other.  Remember Scimina spoke of this when she was torturing Sieh, that Yeine could not kill her with her knife.  Now the sigil was given by Itempas, so maybe it has no power anymore.  Just curious...

 

You know Luanne I am glad you caught this.  I knew Scimina killed Relad, but didn't put the two together with the sigil and keeping them from killing each other.  Wonder if it has to do with Yeine taking the Earth Stone into her.  Then that would mean there is no power to be had by the Heir or Aramari.  Right?

 

 

Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007
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Re: The Broken Kingdom

 

Nadine wrote:

I thought I might set up a different header for any of our forward speculations. That way we can pull them all forward when that book comes out.

 

Have any of you read the sample chapter to The Broken Kingdom at the back of our book?

 

 

Nadine:

The teaser for Book Two was brilliant – I love Oree already!

 

Paul

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Contributor
ScribbledNotes
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎02-28-2010
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Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

 

NKJemisin wrote:

There's too many to name, really.  All the speculations you guys tossed out were interesting, even when they were way off, but mostly I loved the fact that the story made you speculate so much.  I usually worry about being too predictable, but AFAICT most of you did not guess the ending in advance.  So I'm happy. :smileyhappy:

 

Nora

 

 

Nora,

 

Don't worry, I certainly wouldn't call HTK predictable in anyway. I'm a sucker for any media that uses surprises and revleations as its MO and this book was very engaging because of how much of a mystery everything was at first.

 

I also wanted to say that I really enjoyed all of the discussion and insight that you've provided into various plot events and character motivations and how everyone in the book relates to everyone else. It was like you were talking about the characters and events in the book like they really happened and you had been studying them for a long time. After reading all of that, I'm excited that HTK feels like it is created to be very authentic. I can't wait to read the second book.

 

I'm also glad that I wasn't the only one having log-in issues.

 

Brandon

"Preserve your memories, they're all that's left you."
Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

I had a few more areas in which I'm not quite clear. I haven't been able to post for about two days or I would have done so sooner.

 

1) In a previous post Nora indicated that Enefa's personality, as opposed to her soul, is what really disappeared immediately before the body of Yeine was resurrected by the power of the stone. I believe Nora also said that the souls of Enefa and Yeine more-or-less merged with the personality of Yeine in control. That statement seems to be add odds with the text. Specifically, on p. 378, (while the souls of Yeine and Enefa linger in the presence of the stone), the following conversation occurs:

 

(Yeine) You mean…I can come back to life? Amazing. How convenient that Viraine turned on me.

 

(Enefa) I prefer to think of it as fate.

 

(Yeine) So what now?

 

(Enefa) Your body must change. It will no longer be able to bear two souls within itself; that is the ability only mortals possess. I made your kind that way, gifted in ways that we are not, but I never dreamt it would make you so strong. Strong enough to defeat me, in spite of all my efforts. Strong enough to take my place.

 

After that Enefa explains that her essence is necessary for the world to continue and states that Yeine must restore that essence. The conversation ends with Yeine stating that she will somehow reunite the three gods and Enefa saying …Thank you. And farewell.

 

 

2) I also had a problem casting Nahadoth as entity which can be either male or female. A previous post by Nora indicated that Enefa is definitively female, Itempas is definitively male but Nahadoth is male who can also be a female. As an intellectual matter I suppose sexual gender is a matter of will for the god of the void/ chaos/change. Nonetheless Nahadoth seems to be definitively cast as a male entity by the mythology created within the book. In this regard, the Enefadeh always refer to Nahadoth as father. They're god-born entities which have existed for ages of millenniums, and to them Nahadoth is their father and a male. Then, there's the myth of the god born mortals referred to by Yeine in which Nahadoth fathers a mortal child who he later kills. (This myth is later confirmed by Nahadoth who indicates that god born mortal children represented a risk to the gods by mixing mortality with the essence of the gods. The point being that Nahadoth is again cast in the role of the sire or male progenitor. Further, there's the appendix concerning the historical record of the Arameri family (pp. 406-410). In that historical record by Aetr, daughter of the first high priestess of Shara, Nahadoth is referred to on p. 409 as a Lord Nahadoth. Note, at the time Nahadoth and the Endefadeh have just been delivered within their fleshy prisons to be used by the Amareri family. In other words, even at the first appearance of the male Naha, Nahadoth is referred to as a masculine entity. 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

 

 

NKJemisin wrote:

 

pen21 wrote:

Nora,

After reading our posts with our thoughts and predictions, what are the biggest surprises?

What prediction or assumption made you laugh out loud, spit out your coffee?

What post had a key element of the story identified earlier than you thought we would?

Just off the top of your head. No need to read through all the posts.

Thanks Luanne

 

 

There's too many to name, really.  All the speculations you guys tossed out were interesting, even when they were way off, but mostly I loved the fact that the story made you speculate so much.  I usually worry about being too predictable, but AFAICT most of you did not guess the ending in advance.  So I'm happy. :smileyhappy:

 

Nora

 

 

 

Would you like us to test your next two books for you? :smileywink:

Author
NKJemisin
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎02-18-2010

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

 

Liago wrote:

Same here sorry I wasn't able to join in more but the login here is so unpredictable so I just end up reading along :smileyhappy:

 

I enjoyed the way everything turned out and am looking forward to the next books. It will be interesting to see how Itempas deals with his punishment. Especially since he hates change so much we get a glimps of him being suicildal at the end but will he get over this and try and cause some sort of chaos in the world? This would be interesting since chaos is sort of his opposite.

 

Question for Nora, with the next books encompasing more of your world, will we see any sort of maps in them or will you leave the "vision" of the landscapes up to our minds?

 

 

Hi Liago,

 

No maps!  :smileyhappy:  I hate maps in fantasy novels.  Diana Wynne Jones, a British fantasy author who wrote The Tough Guide to Fantasyland (hilarious and highly recommended, BTW) points out how most readers can guess where the story will go based on which locations get named on fantasy-novel maps.  It's just a natural consequence of the fact that the map-makers can't make the map too complex or include things that aren't relevant to the story (like a real map would), or it becomes confusing.  So the maps make things more predictable.

 

Also, I should clarify: the next book will show more of the society of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms -- i.e., what life is like for people who aren't nobility.  But the bulk of the story will take place in the city beneath Sky, which has developed the nickname "Shadow" in the ten years since the previous book (for obvious reasons, now that the World Tree has grown).  Shadow is big and strange and beautiful and more than a little frightening -- like New York on hallucinogens, sort of.  And what map could do New York justice, without simplifying it to the point of silliness?  So no map. :smileyhappy:

 

Nora

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Re: The Broken Kingdom

I think I'm giving up on making this "Quote" thing behave properly. So I just copied things out and cobbled some stuff together so I could repost our "Facts We Know List" up front:

 

In her interview in the back, Nora makes some statements about what will be in the next book.

 

1. "In book two, you'll learn what becomes of Itempas after his fall from power."

 

2. "what caused him to turn on his fellow gods at the start of the Gods' War.

 

3 "In book two, I want to focus on the ordinary people of this world .

 

4. "how they cope when giant trees obscure the sky"

 

5. "the corner grocer might be a godling in disguise."

 

6. "The story will focus on a young blindwoman who finds a homeless man in her trash heap one morning--glowing like the rising sun."

 

7. :smileyfrustrated:he takes him in and this simple act of kindness lands her in the middle of a conspiracy to destroy the gods."

 

8. "Many characters from the first book will put in an appearance"

 

9. He [Itempas] also has a "light" nature -- but as book 2 will show, "light" does not necessarily mean "good" or "nice" or any of the other terms we normally associate with brightness.

 

From Melissa: Don't forget this comment by Nora:

 

10. T'vril will appear, briefly, in book 2

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006

Re: The Broken Kingdom

I think it is very intreguing having a blind person as the major character in this book. We should certainly get a different perspective. The other interesting thing is that she can see the godlings. The person she pulled from the trash seems to be good old Itempas. The big clue is that she is very accumstumed to seeing gods but on page 424 she remarks: I saw glory awaken in my trash pile."

 

Someone speculated somewhere (sorry I can't find it) that Itempas was likely to be suicidal. Well, it certainly looks that way, though a lot of good it does him. And another clue to the fact that this is Itempas: page 427: "I'd come to know him as a man of almost compulsive integrity, predictable as the tolling of a White Hall bell. He did not like it when the scales between us were unbalanced."

 

She obviously doesn't think too much of the gods. I am wondering if she is an unusual character who happens to be blind or if this might be the norm in this world. This big tree that Yeine grew up over everything might have blocked out all the sunlight -- well after all the god of daylight is out of commission right now.

 

Now where did all these godlings come from? They seem to be a major population sector. We don't know how much time has passed yet since the end of the last book but it has to be in T'vril's lifetime since he is going to make an appearance. Has Itempas been breeding up a storm between his suicide attemps?

 

Now Oree seems like a fascinating character. She is pretty casual about things, especially since she does take in a god. And, one of the things that threw me on her blindness, is that she is a painter. She doesn't seem blind in the ordinary sense. At first I thought she was just seeing the glowing form of the gods, but she actually "sees" detail. Page 425: "But as I stood there, transfixed by those eyes, I saw something else: pain." [Emphasis mine.]

 

Also, note: in this book as in the last, the narrator is not telling the story in real time but from a future perspective.

Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: The Broken Kingdom

Nadine wrote:

I think I'm giving up on making this "Quote" thing behave properly. So I just copied things out and cobbled some stuff together so I could repost our "Facts We Know List" up front:

 

In her interview in the back, Nora makes some statements about what will be in the next book.

 

1. "In book two, you'll learn what becomes of Itempas after his fall from power."

 

2. "what caused him to turn on his fellow gods at the start of the Gods' War.

 

3 "In book two, I want to focus on the ordinary people of this world .

 

4. "how they cope when giant trees obscure the sky"

 

5. "the corner grocer might be a godling in disguise."

 

6. "The story will focus on a young blindwoman who finds a homeless man in her trash heap one morning--glowing like the rising sun."

 

7. :smileyfrustrated:he takes him in and this simple act of kindness lands her in the middle of a conspiracy to destroy the gods."

 

8. "Many characters from the first book will put in an appearance"

 

9. He [Itempas] also has a "light" nature -- but as book 2 will show, "light" does not necessarily mean "good" or "nice" or any of the other terms we normally associate with brightness.

 

From Melissa: Don't forget this comment by Nora:

 

10. T'vril will appear, briefly, in book 2

 

Hey Nadine, I have a few recent comments from Nora I would like to add to your list here:

 

 

11)  As for the new heir having power -- yes. Plenty. As Yeine points out, the Arameri still have insane amounts of wealth, political power, an army (though not much of one, since they've rarely needed it before now), and both the magical power (scriveners) and "propaganda power" of the Order of Itempas. However, they're no longer invulnerable, which will play a role in coming books

 

12)  Also, I should clarify: the next book will show more of the society of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms -- i.e., what life is like for people who aren't nobility. But the bulk of the story will take place in the city beneath Sky, which has developed the nickname "Shadow" in the ten years since the previous book (for obvious reasons, now that the World Tree has grown). Shadow is big and strange and beautiful and more than a little frightening -- like New York on hallucinogens, sort of. And what map could do New York justice, without simplifying it to the point of silliness? So no map.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Broken Kingdom

Thanks, Melissa! There are far too many posts in this thread! And our sporatic access to things is making it difficult to figure out what you have read (unlogged in as opposed to logged in). I've been tagging all of this under "broken-kingdom" so we can find it again next November or whenever.

Author
NKJemisin
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎02-18-2010

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

 

dalnewt wrote:

I had a few more areas in which I'm not quite clear. I haven't been able to post for about two days or I would have done so sooner.

 

1) In a previous post Nora indicated that Enefa's personality, as opposed to her soul, is what really disappeared immediately before the body of Yeine was resurrected by the power of the stone. I believe Nora also said that the souls of Enefa and Yeine more-or-less merged with the personality of Yeine in control. That statement seems to be add odds with the text. Specifically, on p. 378, (while the souls of Yeine and Enefa linger in the presence of the stone), the following conversation occurs:

 

(Yeine) You mean…I can come back to life? Amazing. How convenient that Viraine turned on me.

 

(Enefa) I prefer to think of it as fate.

 

(Yeine) So what now?

 

(Enefa) Your body must change. It will no longer be able to bear two souls within itself; that is the ability only mortals possess. I made your kind that way, gifted in ways that we are not, but I never dreamt it would make you so strong. Strong enough to defeat me, in spite of all my efforts. Strong enough to take my place.

 

After that Enefa explains that her essence is necessary for the world to continue and states that Yeine must restore that essence. The conversation ends with Yeine stating that she will somehow reunite the three gods and Enefa saying …Thank you. And farewell.

 

 

2) I also had a problem casting Nahadoth as entity which can be either male or female. A previous post by Nora indicated that Enefa is definitively female, Itempas is definitively male but Nahadoth is male who can also be a female. As an intellectual matter I suppose sexual gender is a matter of will for the god of the void/ chaos/change. Nonetheless Nahadoth seems to be definitively cast as a male entity by the mythology created within the book. In this regard, the Enefadeh always refer to Nahadoth as father. They're god-born entities which have existed for ages of millenniums, and to them Nahadoth is their father and a male. Then, there's the myth of the god born mortals referred to by Yeine in which Nahadoth fathers a mortal child who he later kills. (This myth is later confirmed by Nahadoth who indicates that god born mortal children represented a risk to the gods by mixing mortality with the essence of the gods. The point being that Nahadoth is again cast in the role of the sire or male progenitor. Further, there's the appendix concerning the historical record of the Arameri family (pp. 406-410). In that historical record by Aetr, daughter of the first high priestess of Shara, Nahadoth is referred to on p. 409 as a Lord Nahadoth. Note, at the time Nahadoth and the Endefadeh have just been delivered within their fleshy prisons to be used by the Amareri family. In other words, even at the first appearance of the male Naha, Nahadoth is referred to as a masculine entity. 

 

 

Hi Dalnewt,

 

Hmm.  I'm beginning to think this isn't something I can explain in whatever way you're looking for.  And I've spent rather more time on this than I'd really like to, given that I've got a deadline coming up. So I'm going to try one more time to explain, and then if this doesn't suffice I'll just leave it to you to interpret things however you like.  It's a myth.  It's flexible.  :smileyhappy:

 

In fact, I'll start with that point:  how myths work.  I spent years digesting mythology and current belief systems both before and while I wrote The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms.  I was borrowing ideas, yes (and also attempting to avoid sounding too much like any one mythology/system).  But I was also borrowing the structure of those systems, so that regardless of what I came up with, it would have the feel of a "real" myth.  (Sorry for the oxymoron.)  And one of the key elements of any mythology or belief system is the incorporation of overlap and contradiction (syncretism).  Christianity, for example, has its "Three" (Holy Trinity) too, and there's a lot of disagreement about how that whole thing works among the various adherents of the faith.  Is Jesus the same as God or a separate being?  (He's described both ways in the Bible, so that's no help.)  Is the Holy Spirit Jesus' female principle or God's self-directed soul?  And that's leaving aside the fact that some sects of Christianity don't acknowledge either Jesus or the Holy Spirit as anything more important than a myth.

 

So I applied this to the mythology in my books.  There's the Maelstrom, which nobody even tries to understand.  Does it act with a purpose when it creates gods, or does it just spit them out randomly?  Even the gods know better than to touch that one.  Then there's the Three:  Nahadoth isn't wholly chaotic, Itempas isn't wholly orderly, and Enefa lost her balance somewhere along the way.  And the godlings:  there is no clear explanation for Sieh's nature.  The Arameri First Scriveners have written entire books about him, and they still don't understand him -- even though they had him captive and could ask him whatever questions they wanted.  (Granted, he lies.)  He's a trickster.  He's a cat.  He's the god of mischief.  He's the god of childhood. He is all these things, and then some.  (He's also been a she, in the past, though he eventually decided to be permanently male.)  None of these things are mutually exclusive.

 

So basically I'm saying there's no way I can make this neat or simple.  Gods aren't supposed to be neat and simple.  Yes, Enefa is dead.  (In the same passage you quoted above, Yeine also noted, "My soul is not used to solitude.")  But technically speaking there's a bit of Enefa left -- the Stone of Earth, which was a chunk of Enefa's old body and is now part of Yeine's, and also whatever portion of Enefa's soul was necessary to give Yeine a "goddess makeover".  :smileyhappy:  So Enefa is both alive and dead, as Yeine is both alive and dead.  (She has no heart, remember.  Just the Stone.)  They're the goddesses of life and death; what do you expect?  :smileyhappy:

 

And about Nahadoth's gender -- yes, Nahadoth is male, and has been since the Gods' War (and actually long before that).  She's also female and has been so at various times prior to and during human history, which is why the Library embossing depicted her that way.  (She has even borne children to Itempas, though rarely -- those godlings tend to be very, very unstable.  You'll meet one of them in The Broken Kingdoms.)  Nahadoth is also hermaphroditic (or intersex if you prefer that term), and genders we don't have a name for, and no gender at all. 

 

Remember that the story is being narrated by Yeine, who knows only what she's been taught about history -- and everything prior to about 2000 years before has been erased or distorted.  Also remember that 2000 years encompasses an incredibly small fraction of Nahadoth's total life thus far.  Let's say the mortal realm in the Inheritance Trilogy -- i.e., the universe -- is the same age as in our universe, about 14 billion years old at the latest estimate.  My quick math says 2000 years represents about 0.0000142 percent of 14 billion years.  Might be off by a zero somewhere, but you get the idea.  If I were to break that down in terms of the average days in a human lifetime (assuming 75 years x 365 days, or 27,375 days), that's the equivalent of 0.004 days of life, for you and me.  Google Calculator says that's about 6 minutes.

 

Time doesn't scale like that, of course; 2000 years can still pass verrrrrry slowly for gods, especially if they spend that time in utter misery.  And those numbers are way off because Nahadoth is much older than the universe.  His true age can't be counted, because he's older than time.  But basically, not even the god of change feels like changing every minute.

 

OK, back to writing.

 

Nora

Author
NKJemisin
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎02-18-2010

Re: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms: Through End of book!

 

Nadine wrote:

 

 

NKJemisin wrote:

 

pen21 wrote:

Nora,

After reading our posts with our thoughts and predictions, what are the biggest surprises?

What prediction or assumption made you laugh out loud, spit out your coffee?

What post had a key element of the story identified earlier than you thought we would?

Just off the top of your head. No need to read through all the posts.

Thanks Luanne

 

 

There's too many to name, really.  All the speculations you guys tossed out were interesting, even when they were way off, but mostly I loved the fact that the story made you speculate so much.  I usually worry about being too predictable, but AFAICT most of you did not guess the ending in advance.  So I'm happy. :smileyhappy:

 

Nora

 

 

 

Would you like us to test your next two books for you? :smileywink:

 

 

Sure, when they come out.  :smileywink:  Though depending on how many Advanced Reader Copies I get this time, I might be amenable to holding a contest here, for one of them.  :smileyhappy:  Won't know for several months, though.

 

Nora

Author
NKJemisin
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎02-18-2010

Re: The Broken Kingdom

 

Nadine wrote:

I think it is very intreguing having a blind person as the major character in this book. We should certainly get a different perspective. The other interesting thing is that she can see the godlings. The person she pulled from the trash seems to be good old Itempas. The big clue is that she is very accumstumed to seeing gods but on page 424 she remarks: I saw glory awaken in my trash pile."

 

Someone speculated somewhere (sorry I can't find it) that Itempas was likely to be suicidal. Well, it certainly looks that way, though a lot of good it does him. And another clue to the fact that this is Itempas: page 427: "I'd come to know him as a man of almost compulsive integrity, predictable as the tolling of a White Hall bell. He did not like it when the scales between us were unbalanced."

 

She obviously doesn't think too much of the gods. I am wondering if she is an unusual character who happens to be blind or if this might be the norm in this world. This big tree that Yeine grew up over everything might have blocked out all the sunlight -- well after all the god of daylight is out of commission right now.

 

Now where did all these godlings come from? They seem to be a major population sector. We don't know how much time has passed yet since the end of the last book but it has to be in T'vril's lifetime since he is going to make an appearance. Has Itempas been breeding up a storm between his suicide attemps?

 

Now Oree seems like a fascinating character. She is pretty casual about things, especially since she does take in a god. And, one of the things that threw me on her blindness, is that she is a painter. She doesn't seem blind in the ordinary sense. At first I thought she was just seeing the glowing form of the gods, but she actually "sees" detail. Page 425: "But as I stood there, transfixed by those eyes, I saw something else: pain." [Emphasis mine.]

 

Also, note: in this book as in the last, the narrator is not telling the story in real time but from a future perspective.

 

 

I'm not going to say much about The Broken Kingdoms, because it'll be out soon anyway, and because no matter what I say you guys are going to have fun with this.  :smileyhappy:  But I want to note something you might have missed in the first book, on p. 6 ("Now there are dozens [of gods], perhaps hundreds.  They breed like rabbits.") and also on p. 14 ("Not the gods that remain in the heavens, who are loyal to Bright Itempas.").  Basically, there are several dozen godlings that we haven't seen yet -- those who either fought for Itempas' side or stayed neutral.  Itempas has been keeping them away from the mortal realm all these centuries.  But now that Itempas is no longer in power...

 

Nora