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Inspired Scribe
carmen22
Posts: 988
Registered: ‎01-12-2009
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Music

  I just finished reading The Name of the Wind by Rothfuss and am on the fourth book of The Pellinor series by Alison Croggon. These books use music in an exhilarating, spine-tingling and captivating way. I really rather enjoy the use of Music as such a powerful thing and was wondering if other people feel the same way and if there are other books that use music in such a enlivening way?
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"Bright colors, Vasher thought. I'll have to get used to those again. In any other nation, the vibrant blues and yellows would have been ridiculous on soldiers. This, however, was Hallandren: land of Returned gods, Lifeless servants, BioChromatic research, and - of course - color." Warbreaker By Brandon Sanderson
Frequent Contributor
Jon_B
Posts: 1,893
Registered: ‎07-15-2008

Re: Music

The Memory of Whiteness by Kim Stanley Robinson is a great scifi book that revolves around music.  The protagonist is a composer from out beyond Pluto doing a grand tour of the solar system getting gradually closer to the sun.  If you are familiar with Robinson's more famous "Red Mars / Green Mars / Blue Mars" series, this book kind of "crosses through" that series during the stop on Mars.  It's somewhat surreal and very philosopical, maybe a little too philosopical at times.  But still, a pretty good read.
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Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006

Re: Music


carmen22 wrote:
  I just finished reading The Name of the Wind by Rothfuss and am on the fourth book of The Pellinor series by Alison Croggon. These books use music in an exhilarating, spine-tingling and captivating way. I really rather enjoy the use of Music as such a powerful thing and was wondering if other people feel the same way and if there are other books that use music in such a enlivening way?

Tolkien uses songs throughout his Lord of the Rings. However, the most beautiful way he used music was in the first chapter of the Silmarillion -- his creation story. The world was actually created from a song. It is called the Ainuindale and beautifully developed.If you want to hear this read you can go to Audio of Ainuindale. The introductory music sounds a lot like Wagner's creation theme from his opera Rhinegold.

Inspired Bibliophile
Nelsmom
Posts: 2,628
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Music

Jon,

 

Thank you for the information on the book and I am going to see if the library has a copy of it.  My son and I have read the Mars series and enjoyed them very much.

 

Toni

Toni L. Chapman
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paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007

Re: Music

Carmen

I'd suggest Singer in the Snow by Louise Marley, who, besides being a fantastic writer has also been an opera and folk singer, an elementary school music teacher and a college music professor. Music is a huge element in many of her novels but in Singer in the Snow, the use of music is just magical. Although, this book is categorized as "YA" I read and reviewed it for BN.com a few years ago and was blown away by the "ageless" power of Louise's message. I'll post my review below in case you – or anyone else – is interested...

Paul

 

 Singer in the Snow by Louise Marley: Book Cover

 

The Barnes & Noble Review
Almost ten years since the conclusion of her Singers of Nevya trilogy (Sing the Light, Sing the Warmth, and Receive the Gift), Louise Marley returns to the ice planet with a science fantasy masterwork about two unique young women struggling to realize their potential.

On the planet of Nevya -- a world without any advanced technology where summer only comes every five years -- simply being outside at the wrong time can mean certain death. The Nevyans depend solely on Singers ("Gifted" individuals with the ability to channel psi energy through music to create heat and light) for survival. Mreen is one of the most powerful psi channelers Nevya has ever seen, but she's completely mute. Emle, on the other hand, is an exceptional Singer who can't productively channel her energy. When the two are sent from the shelter of the Nevyan Conservatory to a distant outpost, they must rely on each other for strength. But once at Tarus, their problems become secondary, as the two become involved in a young Gifted girl's life-and-death struggle to survive a negligent mother and a violently abusive stepfather.

From the beautifully lyrical writing style and deeply heartfelt themes to the extraordinary cover art and design, Marley's Singer in the Snow is truly magical. While categorized as a young adult title, this novel can -- and should -- be read by science fiction and fantasy fans of all ages. Remember the first time you read Le Guin's Earthsea novels or Tolkien's Lord of the Rings? All that timeless magic and wisdom is just as powerful in this instant classic. Paul Goat Allen

 

 

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Inspired Scribe
carmen22
Posts: 988
Registered: ‎01-12-2009
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Re: Music

   Thank you Jon, Nadine and Paul and if you happen across any others I would love to hear about them and thanks once again!!

 

Krista

_______________________
"Bright colors, Vasher thought. I'll have to get used to those again. In any other nation, the vibrant blues and yellows would have been ridiculous on soldiers. This, however, was Hallandren: land of Returned gods, Lifeless servants, BioChromatic research, and - of course - color." Warbreaker By Brandon Sanderson