Reply
Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,326
Registered: ‎08-16-2007
0 Kudos

NOVEMBER FEATURE #2: Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson

There is no other SF saga that even comes close to Frank Herbert's Dune. But when Frank Herbert died in 1986, he left behind a vast storyline with more than a few holes. His son Brian and Kevin J. Anderson have done an amazing job filling in those gaps and in their latest collaboration, Paul of Dune, they explore the lost years after the events in Dune and before those in Dune Messiah. This is Paul Muad'Dib's story...

 

I know a few of you have expressed doubt about reading this book when they haven't read any of the Herbert/Anderson works. It doesn't matter. Paul of Dune is, according to Tor Books, "a direct sequel to Dune." All you spice lovers out there should definitely check out this chronicle of Paul's "lost years".

 

This novel is one of those books that has the potential to be universally embraced or universally panned – Dune is hallowed ground for millions of readers and it will be interesting to see how those people react to this novel, which I believe is Herbert/Anderson's first venture into Frank Herbert's Dune/Dune Messiah/Children of Dune timeline. 

 

Please tell me what you think – I'll throw in my two cents once I've read Paul of Dune.

Paul 

 

 

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Paul-of-Dune/Brian-Herbert/e/9780765312945/?itm=2

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Inspired Bibliophile
Nelsmom
Posts: 2,628
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: NOVEMBER FEATURE #2: Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson

I have only read the first third of the book so far but am enjoying it very much.  I will like Paul have more comments when I finish the book.

 

Toni

Toni L. Chapman
Everyone needs some Tender Loving Care
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: NOVEMBER FEATURE #2: Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson

I have to read Dune first (I'm probably the only one on this board who hasn't) so I will be a little late to this discussion. My movie version just arrived but I think I really need the book.

 

I changed my avatar for this month. This is as close as I could come to a Bene Gesserit Lady. Hey, how do we get more avatars? 

Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,326
Registered: ‎08-16-2007
0 Kudos

Re: NOVEMBER FEATURE #2: Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson


Nadine wrote:

I have to read Dune first (I'm probably the only one on this board who hasn't) so I will be a little late to this discussion. My movie version just arrived but I think I really need the book.

 

I changed my avatar for this month. This is as close as I could come to a Bene Gesserit Lady. Hey, how do we get more avatars? 


Nadine:

Nice avatar – I had heard somewhere that more avatars may be coming soon. I'll have to check...

Paul 

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Inspired Bibliophile
Nelsmom
Posts: 2,628
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: NOVEMBER FEATURE #2: Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson

We finished Paul Of Dune and I must say that I feel Brian and Kevin did an excellent job bridging Dune and Dune Messiah with this book.  It also answered a lot of questions that I had asked myself when I orginally read the series when they came out.  I will not say anything more right now because I don't want to spoil it for those that are reading it now or will read it.  I know that there has been some controversy over the quality and style of the books that have come out since Frank passed away.  But I think that his son Brian and Friend Kevin Anderson have not compromised the work in anyway.  Yes style is a little different but still very good.

 

Toni

Toni L. Chapman
Everyone needs some Tender Loving Care
Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,326
Registered: ‎08-16-2007
0 Kudos

Re: NOVEMBER FEATURE #2: Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson

Toni:

That's fantastic to hear – I was hoping it was going to be not only well written but somewhat insightful as well. I'm just finishing up Ghost Radio for Paranormal then I'm going to  jump right into this. I'll give you my takein a few days.

 

Has anyone else there read Paul of Dune yet? What are your thoughts?

Paul 

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: NOVEMBER FEATURE #2: Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson

I'm not quite sure where I should post my comments. I will have some specifically related to Dune, the original (and I could use the "First Impressions" thread), the body of work, and the relationship of Dune to Paul of Dune (proabably). My first post is on the body of work so I guess maybe the best place is here, but where whould I put specific statements about Dune?

 

Do you have a ruling on this, Paul!?

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
0 Kudos

Re: NOVEMBER FEATURE #2: Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson

There is a Dune thread all it's own.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Paul of Dune: Tolkien-Herbert Legacy

Tolkien-Herbert Legacy

I am noticing a lot of similarities between J.R.R. Tolkien and Frank Herbert. One is their legacy, in particular how their works have been handled after their deaths. Both left their works and the determination as to how the legacy was to be handled to their children. Both Tolkien and Herbert were "world creators" and created complex worlds peopled by many individuals that encouraged the development of additional stories. Herbert's son Brian chose to join with an another author and continue the legacy building on his father's works and notes and his own and co-writer's imagination to continue and fill out the saga. Christopher, Tolkien's son, chose a very different route. He chose to stay with the cannon -- only what his father had actually written. He collected them into loose works, kind of anthologies of tales, two stand-alone books where fragmented stories were pieced together to form a cohesive whole, and histories (for scholars and fanatics only). He also did not allow any other writers to build on Tolkien's world and create their own stories. The result is we will never have a stories about the further adventures of Merry and Pippin, or the sequel to LOTR that Tolkien started (and can be found in the Histories, Vol IX), nor will anyone ever sort out and publish a fascinating back-story of Galadriel or many of the other characters.

Personally, I prefer Brian's approach. We have been deprived of such a rich heritage in Tolkien's world and I think Tolkien would have wanted it used as a basis for further stories. After all he clearly stated he was creating a "mythology for England".

I have not yet read any Dune books and certainly not any written by Brian, but I think Brian, even though he might not be the writer that his father was and maybe should have chosen a stronger partner, took the better approach by continuing the legacy.

I probably will have more to say on this subject once I have read Dune and Paul of Dune (which fall together as a good pairing for the legacy question). But in the mean time I was wondering what the rest of you might think about the continuation of an author's legacy. Should it be left "pure" and uncorrupted or should it be allowed to be continued by other writers even though the work might be inferior?
Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,326
Registered: ‎08-16-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Paul of Dune: Tolkien-Herbert Legacy

Nadine:

Excellent post. The connection between Tolkien and Herbert – especially considering what their sons have done with their "legacy" – is undeniable. Since it's publication in 1965, it's amazing how many critics have compared Dune to LOTR. It's almost inevitable. I've read Dune numerous times over the years – one of the very few books I've ever read more than once – and when I got the opportunity to write a review for B&N back in '03, here's how I described it:

 

"Science Fiction’s Supreme Masterpiece. The first novel to win both the Hugo and Nebula Award. To science fiction what Lord of the Rings is to fantasy. The beginning of a saga that has sold more copies than any other science fiction series in history. Originally published in novel form in 1965, Dune is arguably the most famous science fiction novel ever written. Over the last four decades, the grandest epic in the genre has ingrained itself into the human consciousness – the mere mention of spice or sandworms or the desert planet of Arrakis elicits instant recognition in most people, even ones who have never read the novels... It’s hard to categorize Dune and the subsequent novels as simply science fiction because the story has so many thematic threads – environmentalism, mysticism, politics, psychology, linguistics and human evolution, to name a few."

 

I never really compared Christopher Tolkien's work with Brian Herbert's before but I'm so glad you brought this topic up!  I am a big fan of The Children of Hurin and I would LOVE to read more prehistory adventures from Middle-earth but I don't ever see that happening. Both these sagas are sacred ground and expanding upon the storylines is dangerous to say the least. No one wants to tarnish the legacy of Dune or Middle-earth – least of all the author's offspring – so doing what Brian Herbert and C. Tolkien have done takes a lot of courage in my book. I think Brian was really smart in collaborating with Kevin J. Anderson who is a master at writing massive SF epics. I will admit that I didn't care for their early work but as they wrote more, they really found their groove and their Legends of Dune trilogy (The Butlerian Jihad, The Machine Crusade and The Battle of Corrin) was amazing. 

 

To answer your question, Nadine, I think both Christopher Tolkien and Brian Herbert continued their father's literary legacy with class and intelligence. While both utilized two very different writing systems, I think the end-product of both definitely didn't tarnish any legacy and in many ways made both legacies more paltable to a new generation of readers. Again, I'd love to see Christopher Tolkien do more Children of Hurin-type novels  but if no more of J.R.R.'s notes are unearthed, then I guess it's just wishful thinking...

Paul 

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,287
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Paul of Dune: Tolkien-Herbert Legacy

I just bought this book from B&N today for $5.98 so I am now looking forward to reading it.
"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,326
Registered: ‎08-16-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Paul of Dune: Tolkien-Herbert Legacy


fforgnayr wrote:
I just bought this book from B&N today for $5.98 so I am now looking forward to reading it.

Ryan:

Dude, you can't beat $5.98 for a hardcover. You'll have to tell me how you enjoyed it...

Paul 

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky