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pen21
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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases

VermontCozy gave me a heads up on these ebook releases by Mira Grant.

Susan knows I love the Mira Grant books.

 

Countdown 

The year is 2014, the year everything changed. We cured cancer. We cured the common cold. We died. This is the story of how we rose. When will you rise? Countdown is a novella set in the world of Feed. 

Apocalypse Scenario #683   

A new short story from Mira Grant, the author of Feed. Every week five friends get together to play a game-- a game they call the Apocalypse Game. It's a fun time with chips and beer and plotting the end of the world. Except this time, one of them is missing and the stakes are higher than ever before.

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dalnewt
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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases

[ Edited ]
I just picked up  

A Soldier's Duty and 

Germline  

at my local B&N. I don't know when I'll get to them, but I'm looking forward to it.:smileyhappy:

 

I also picked up <coughs> a few other books. One is the followup to Chimera (Chimera Series #1) entitled  

Basilisk (Chimera Series #2).  

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Htom_Serveaux
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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases

As usual, fall brings some Good Stuff with it:

 

Yet Another Discworld novel:

 

Snuff (Discworld Series #39)  
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and the third Sandman Slim installment:

 

Aloha from Hell (Sandman Slim Series #3)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And some current new goodies:

 

The Panama Laugh  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

which I'm enjoying so far, significant in that I *hate* zombie stories. :smileyhappy:

 

And last but not least the off beat

 

The Postmortal  

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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases

[ Edited ]

Here are the October Fantasy and Sci-Fi releases listed by Tor: Fiction Affliction: Diagnosing October Releases in Fantasy and Fiction Affliction: Diagnosing October Releases in Science Fiction

 

Notable October Sci-Fi releases include: Frail (Featured #2 on Paranormal and Urban Fantasy board); The Children of the Sky (Feature #2 on this board); and, Zone One (to be released October 18).

 

(Note, other books listed by Tor on Fiction Affliction: Diagnosing October Releases in Urban Fantasy, Horror, and Paranormal Romance might interest people on this board. I'm interested in many books on that list including The Twilight of Lake Woebegotton and Mayberry's horror book entitled Dead of Night. For sure I'm going to get Kadrey's third Sandman Slim book Aloha from Hell.)

 

Notable October Fantasy releases include: the October 4 release The Traitor’s Daughter; the sequel to Steel remains entitled The Cold Commands, the 34th Discworld installment Snuff; the fantasy Fenrir (looks good and available right now despite a projected October 25 release date); and, the last book in Jemison's Inheritance trilogy The Kingdom of Gods presently scheduled for release Oct 27.  

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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases


dalnewt wrote:

Here are the October Fantasy and Sci-Fi releases listed by Tor: Fiction Affliction: Diagnosing October Releases in Fantasy and Fiction Affliction: Diagnosing October Releases in Science Fiction

 

Notable October Sci-Fi releases include: Frail (Featured #2 on Paranormal and Urban Fantasy board); The Children of the Sky (Feature #2 on this board); and, Zone One (to be released October 18).

 

(Note, other books listed by Tor on Fiction Affliction: Diagnosing October Releases in Urban Fantasy, Horror, and Paranormal Romance might interest people on this board. I'm interested in many books on that list including The Twilight of Lake Woebegotton and Mayberry's horror book entitled Dead of Night. For sure I'm going to get Kadrey's third Sandman Slim book Aloha from Hell.)

 

Notable October Fantasy releases include: the October 4 release The Traitor’s Daughter; the sequel to Steel remains entitled The Cold Commands, the 34th Discworld installment Snuff; the fantasy Fenrir (looks good and available right now despite a projected October 25 release date); and, the last book in Jemison's Inheritance trilogy The Kingdom of Gods presently scheduled for release Oct 27.  


Here's the cover of the final Inheritance trilogy book by N. K. Jemison to be released October 27:

The Kingdom of Gods  

Cover Image

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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases

[ Edited ]

I forgot to mention that the sequel to Gauntlgrym (Neverwinter Series #1) was released October 4. The book is

Neverwinter (Neverwinter Series #2)

Cover Image

 

A review of the book is set forth below and can be found at GDN: Neverwinter Book II of the Neverwinter Saga Book Review .... 



Neverwinter Book II of the Neverwinter Saga Book Review
Posted by Christophor Rick (TheSuperGuido), 3 days ago

R. A. Salvatore has been writing Drizzt Do`Urden books for longer than some readers have been alive. The first book was published back in 1990 and the unstoppable, long-lived Drow Elf has been churning through adventures ever since.

 

With Wizards of the Coast`s focus on Neverwinter for 2011, Drizzt returns to prominence with the 2010 release of Gauntlgrym and now, the second book in the Neverwinter Saga, Neverwinter, is ready for Drizzt Do’Urden to return to the Jewel of the North, readers in tow.

 

I won’t give any spoilers because that defeats the purpose of a book review. But know that many of the characters from the previous Drizzt books are dead and several from last year’s are still around including the enigmatic Dahlia, and the evil witch Sylora Salm. On top of that there are some stalwarts of the Dungeons and Dragons Forgotten Realms making appearances including Szass Tam, the lich Zulkir of Thay.

 

Events of late have changed the face of not only Neverwinter but the power structures of the region. The Netherese have returned, Thay seeks domninance in the region and Neverwinter is undergoing changes itself including rebuilding, new factions and more.

 

Is it any wonder that Drizzt is drawn back into the area?

 

Salvatore continues to write with his unmistakable form, but Drizzt returns a changed Drow. More introspective because of events in his long life, yet still very much a Drow of action. The high morals that characterize Drizzt, whom Salvatore has described as "the classic romantic hero—misunderstood, holding to a code of ideals even when the going gets tough, and getting no appreciation for it most of the time," in Dragon Magazine #252, are even more prominent now that he seems to be questioning his existence and the meaning of it all.

 

Luckily, the somewhat morose Drow, still stinging from the loss of dear friends, is now accompanied by the mischievous Dahlia Sin’felle who drags him from adventure to adventure.

 

This is where some fans of Drizzt might be less than happy. Drizzt is going through changes, as one imagines living as long as he has, one would. It is refreshing to see the character progression, which is generally lacking in much fiction and to see Salvatore taking the time to further explore the character and look at how so many decades of life would take their toll on someone.

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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases

I'm always on the hunt for unique and resonant fantasies. I just ordered the following book because it looks different and completely appealing.

 

The Hum and the Shiver    (released September 27) 

Cover Image

 

Publishers Weekly -- Bronwyn Hyatt is a young Iraq War veteran invalided out of the Army after she's wounded in the kind of close combat situation that earns men Purple Hearts. Reporters are shocked to find that "The Bronwynator" and her smalltown Tennessee neighbors, while polite, want no publicity. What the reporters don't know is that Bronwyn and her extended family are Tufa, an insular rural group who devote themselves to music, work magic, and fly on the wind. Bledsoe turns standard urban fantasy tropes on their head by reimagining modern elves as a tiny, isolated ethnic group unsure of their own origins, like the Lemkos of Poland or the Melungeons of the southern Appalachians. The plot is a bit thin, but the slowly unfolding mystery of the Tufa is a fascinating and absorbing masterpiece of world-building. (Oct.)

Library Journal --Long before settlers arrived in the Smoky Mountains of East Tennessee, the Tufa, dark-haired people with deep superstitions and a magical power over music, had already claimed the land. Wounded in body and spirit, Private Bronwyn Hyatt returns home from Iraq to her mountain community of Needsville to recover and embrace once more her ancient Tufa heritage. But the trauma of war has stripped her of the songs she once knew, and omens point to an impending death in her family. With a deep love for the mountains embedded in his language, the author of the Eddie LaCrosse fantasy detective series (Burn Me Deadly) crafts a deceptively simple story of family and community, laced throughout with the music and beliefs of a magical reality. VERDICT Elegantly told, this series opener calls to mind the Silver John tales of the late Manly Wade Wellman and should attract a wide readership beyond genre fans.
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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases

I just posted this in the Upcoming Release thread on the PUF board but thought that this board, dedicated to Sci-Fi and Fantasy, was where it should really go. Anyway here's my copied post:

 


dalnewt wrote:

 

I don't know if anyone posted this before, but here's the B&N link for the third Newsflesh book Blackout. It's presently scheduled for release June 1. Per goodreads the cover is going to look lo look like this:

 

 

P.S. I couldn't find a nookbook link, so those with a nook who are interested in this series should hit the request a nookbook from the publisher option.


 

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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases

[ Edited ]

Here are links to the Fiction Affliction lists enumerating the December Releases in Fantasy and Sci-Fi:

  Fiction Affliction: December Releases in Fantasy and

  Fiction Affliction: December Releases in Science Fiction.

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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases

[ Edited ]

dalnewt wrote:

Here are links to the Fiction Affliction lists enumerating the December Releases in Fantasy and Sci-Fi:

  Fiction Affliction: December Releases in Fantasy and

  Fiction Affliction: December Releases in Science Fiction.


Here's the link to the Fiction Affliction Gender-Bender list:  Fiction Affliction: “Genre-Benders” for December.

 

Note, Planesrunner, scheduled for release Dec 6, is particularly appealing (to me).

Planesrunner

 

 

Overview

Multiple-award-winning author making his YA debut

There is not one you. There are many yous. There is not one world. There are many worlds. Ours is one of billions of parallel earths.

When Everett Singh's scientist father is kidnapped from the streets of London, he leaves young Everett a mysterious app on his computer. Suddenly, this teenager has become the owner of the most valuable object in the multiverse-the Infundibulum-the map of all the parallel earths, and there are dark forces in the Ten Known Worlds who will stop at nothing to get it. They've got power, authority, and the might of ten planets-some of them more technologically advanced than our Earth-at their fingertips. He's got wits, intelligence, and a knack for Indian cooking.

To keep the Infundibulum safe, Everett must trick his way through the Heisenberg Gate his dad helped build and go on the run in a parallel Earth. But to rescue his Dad from Charlotte Villiers and the sinister Order, this Planesrunner's going to need friends. Friends like Captain Anastasia Sixsmyth, her adopted daughter Sen, and the crew of the airship Everness.

Can they rescue Everett's father and get the Infundibulum to safety? The game is afoot!

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING:

"Smashing adventure fiction that spans the multiverse without ever losing its cool or its sense of style. Ian McDonald is one of the greats of science fiction, and his young adult debut is everything you could hope for: romantic, action packed, wildly imaginative, and full of heart." --Cory Doctorow, author For the Win

"This is science fiction adventure at its best, and at its core is Everett, the heroic little geekling that we all wanted to be as kids... With "Ten Known Worlds" as part of this book's lore-I want an interdimensional passport ASAP- The adventure simply never stops- Snappy dialogue-and fascinating details round out this marvelous series debut. -Speculative Fiction Examiner

 

Publishers Weekly

In this first YA novel from noted SF writer McDonald (The Dervish House), 14-year-old Everett Singh is still dealing with his parents’ divorce when his quantum physicist father is kidnapped, and both the police and Everett’s father’s boss are acting strangely. Then Everett is emailed a complex computer program, the Infundibulum, which allows Everett, no slouch at math himself, to map out an infinite number of alternate worlds. Everett learns that his father was kidnapped because the governments of the so-called Ten Known Worlds want the Infundibulum for themselves. Soon he winds up in an alternate “electropunk” England in which sophisticated dirigibles rule the skies; there he meets Sen, the pixyish pilot of the Everness, who initially attempts to steal his computer, but becomes a close ally. Athletic, brilliant, and always ahead of the game, Everett is too perfect, but it doesn’t detract from the book’s fun. McDonald writes with scientific and literary sophistication, as well as a wicked sense of humor. Add nonstop action, eccentric characters, and expert universe building, and this first volume of the Everness series is a winner. Ages 12–up. (Dec.)

 

Other notable releases on this list are:

 

Hell Train scheduled for release December 27.

Hell Train

 

Overview

Imagine there was a supernatural chiller that Hammer Films never made. A grand epic produced at the studio’s peak, which played like a cross between the Dracula andFrankenstein films and Dr Terror’s House Of Horrors...

Four passengers meet on a train journey through Eastern Europe during the First World War, and face a mystery that must be solved if they are to survive. As the ‘Arkangel’ races through the war-torn countryside, they must find out:

What is in the casket that everyone is so afraid of?

What is the tragic secret of the veiled Red Countess who travels with them?

Why is their fellow passenger the army brigadier so feared by his own men?

And what exactly is the devilish secret of the Arkangel itself?

Bizarre creatures, satanic rites, terrified passengers and the romance of travelling by train, all in a classically styled horror novel.

 

Publishers Weekly

The affection of British Fantasy Award–winner Fowler for classic Hammer Films horror movies pays off in this intricately recursive tale of terror. In London, 1966, American writer Shane Carter is given less than five days to come up with a script for Hammer’s next Peter Cushing vehicle. Given only the vague guidance that the plot should have something to do with a train, Carter finds an old board game called Hell Train. The narrative shifts to a story within the story, as an unnamed young girl ignores the warning message on the same game, and then to the conceit of the game itself: a disparate group of desperate people in 1916 Carpathia board a mysterious midnight train to an unknown destination. Fowler (the Bryant and May series) neatly incorporates many of the Hammer studio’s trademarks: “young lovers, fearsome creatures, a dire warning, rituals and curses, and dreadful consequences.” The shocks never stop coming, bolstered by crisp writing and well-defined, sympathetic characters. (Dec.)

 

Mike Resnick's The Doctor and the Kid  that has already been released.

The Doctor and the Kid: A Weird West Tale

 

Publishers Weekly

Resnick follows the first Weird West Tale, 2010’s The Buntline Special, with another dime-novel adventure featuring famous gunslinger Doc Holliday. Holliday is all set to retire to the sanatorium and die of consumption until a desire to impress Oscar Wilde leads him to make a terrible mistake at the gambling table. Broke, Holliday must recoup his funds with his guns. Seeking the bounty on Billy the Kid, the self-deprecating Holliday teams up with Thomas Edison and Ned Buntline to pit their science against the magic of the Indians while avoiding feminine wiles and local law enforcement. Resnick has done his research, and fast guns, fast plotting, and a comfortably entertaining writing style make this novel a rollicking Western with a steampunk tweak. (Dec.)

 

 

Dean Koontz's 77 Shadow Street scheduled for release December 27

77 Shadow Street

  

Robert
Conroy's Himmler's War (apparently presently available in hardback form)

 

And, a (very interesting) novella novella scheduled for release December 28 which is entitled The Ballad of Ballard and Sandrine

  

 

Publishers Weekly

Twisting time and expectations, Straub’s disturbing novella slowly submerges readers in an enigmatic nightmare. Ballard and Sandrine are lovers decades apart in age. As they enjoy a yacht trip down the Amazon River, all their needs are taken care of—including supplies for their increasingly brutal acts of sadomasochism—but they never see the crew and are barred from parts of the boat. Unreliable memories and visions float through the repetitive days, and breaking the rules seems like harmless fun until the couple are faced with situations that threaten their serenity and sanity. Peculiar and upsetting moments flicker in and out of early scenes before steadily building to the climax. Horror master Straub (A Special Place) creates a deeply unsettling mystery, erring only with a conclusion that provides too many answers rather than leaving readers to imagine what lurks below deck. (Jan.)

 

P.S. Human for a Day, a star-studded anthology to be released December 6, looks very good!

Human for a Day

 

The Fiction Affliction book description states the following:

 

Here’s an anthology that examines what it means to be human in all its positive and negative aspects. If you were an intelligent robot, would the opportunity to become human for a day be worth the risks? If a magic spell switched the bodies of a vampire and a teenage girl, would both savor the experience or search for a way to undo the enchantment? Sixteen original stories from Ian Tregillis, Jay Lake, Seanan McGuire, Anton Strout, Fiona Patton, Erik Scott de Bie, Dylan Birtolo, Tanith Lee, Laura Resnick, Jean Rabe, Tim Waggoner, Eugie Foster, Jody Lynn Nye, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, David D. Levine, and Jim C. Hines. 

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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases

[ Edited ]
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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases

[ Edited ]

In March I'll be reading Kingdoms of Dust (scheduled for release 3/1) 

Kingdoms of Dust

 

Those of you who like Brent Weeks, well, note the praise he gives this book on the cover. Here's what PW has to say:

 

Publishers Weekly

Necromancer Isyllt Iskaldur, exiled and forsworn following the events of 2011’s The Bone Palace, takes refuge with her mercenary comrade Adam at the court of the Assari empress. Stalked by agents of rival factions of Quietus, a fast-shrinking order of mages dedicated to containing ancient spirits of entropy, Isyllt and Asheris al Seth, a jinn bound in human flesh, venture into the burning desert in search of the ancient city of Qais and the source of the destructive ghost winds that threaten Assar’s very existence. Downum leavens the fast-paced fantasy adventure with the anger and despair of those bound, sometimes brutally, to preserve humanity’s safety and the moral dilemma the situation presents for Isyllt. This magnificent and multifaceted work, set against a richly detailed quasi-Arabian background, confirms Downum’s Necromancer Chronicles as a top-notch fantasy series. Agent: Jennifer Jackson, the Donald Maass Agency. (Mar.)

 

I LOVED 

The Bone Palace. I couldn't recommend it enough in the   

New and Recommended thread. Furthermore, Downum's books have been independent and completely self-contained so far. I see no reason why she would stray from that pattern, which means that a reader could enjoy this book w/out reading either of the earlier books. Note, I never read her first book, but I completely understood and totally enjoyed The Bone Palace.

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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases


dalnewt wrote:

In March I'll be reading Kingdoms of Dust (scheduled for release 3/1) 

Kingdoms of Dust

 

 

wow great cover

 

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Re: New/Upcoming Fantasy/Sci-Fi Releases

In addition to Kingdoms of Dust (which is waiting for my pickup at my local B&N) I'll also be reading Stina Leicht's And Blue Skies from Pain (3/20 release) 

 

And Blue Skies from Pain

   

Publishers Weekly

This deft sequel to Of Blood and Honey, set in 1977 Ireland, follows half-fey Liam Kelly in his continuing struggles. He longs to convince the Church that fairies are not devils, and to learn about his long-lost father and his people. He’s also trying to come to terms with his metaphorical demons, including his guilt over his wife’s death and the damage he did as a member of the Irish Republican Army, his addiction to heroin, and the shame of being raped in prison. Liam’s allies, from old friends Father Murray and Frankie to chance-met fae-punks, are believable and sympathetic. The action sequences are so fast-paced and his hauntings are so vivid that readers will scarcely notice that most of the book takes place in Liam’s head. Though the magical side of things once again goes largely unexplained, tantalizing glimpses into the fae world and Liam’s growing self-acceptance hint that later installments may step further into the Twilight. Agent: Joe Monti, Barry Goldblatt Literary. (Mar.)

Here's the Fiction Affliction links for Fantasy, Sci-Fi and Glists

 

I loved reading

Of Blood and Honey.  My reader review of the book starts with the following paragraph:

 

"For general fiction readers this book provides a gritty and well-realized portrayal of the powder keg of 1070s Northern Ireland told from the viewpoint of a young Catholic man, named Liam, who is wrongfully arrested and imprisoned as a teenager and eventually joins the IRA. For fans of fantasy or urban fantasy, it provides a wonderfully authentic story with believable Celtic mythology and characters."

 

Based upon the professional reviews published on the B&N site, the following Fantasy, Steampunk and/or Sci-Fi releases looked promising to me:

 

The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year, Volume 6  (3/6 release)

 

Publishers Weekly

Strahan’s sixth annual genre-spanning anthology lacks the clarity (or perhaps narrowness) of purpose of a series focusing solely on fantasy or SF, but the 31 selections demonstrate a knowledge of and affection for the fantastic that rival editors would be hard-pressed to match. Strahan draws from sources across the anglosphere, and the stories are written by authors diverse in origin, gender, and age; venerable giants of the field like Peter S. Beagle and Bruce Sterling are accompanied by youthful newcomers like Hannu Rajaniemi and Princeton senior E. Lily Yu. Casting his net wide allows Strahan to harvest noteworthy fiction that more narrow-minded editors might have overlooked, including Libba Bray’s “The Last Ride of the Glory Girls,” a fascinating tale of an unwilling double agent, and Yu’s “The Cartographer Wasps and the Anarchist Bees,” a fable of occupation and transformation. Short-fiction fans with broad tastes will enjoy this far-ranging anthology. (Mar.) 

 

Joe Golem and the Drowning City   (3/27 release)

 

Library Journal

Comics artist Mignola (Hellboy) and novelist Golden, who previously collaborated on the gothic illustrated horror novel Baltimore, reunite for this tale of an alternate New York City, one ravaged by a 1925 earthquake that submerged the lower half of Manhattan beneath the Atlantic Ocean. The titular character, a bruiser of few words, is one of many colorful characters who populate the Drowning City, including a clockwork Victorian detective, an aging medium, and a mad occult scientist trying to gain the attention of elder gods who exist behind the stars. VERDICT The steampunk supernatural world the authors have created is unique and inventive. Many elements and themes should be familiar to Mignola buffs, but that doesn't diminish the story's originality. The illustrations are a bit disappointing, though, as most add little to the narrative and many are small and vague or indistinguishable. But that's a small mark against an otherwise fun and well-written read. Recommended for fans of Hellboy, dystopian novels, and those who like a little horror with their action stories.—Peter Petruski, Cumberland Cty. Lib. Syst., Carlisle, PA

 

The Games (3/13 releae)

 

Publishers Weekly

In this tense debut, Kosmatka embraces scientific horror, envisioning a future in which genetic engineering is used to create terrible crossbreeds. These creatures are pitted against each other as gladiators in the Olympic Games, with fortunes and careers riding on each battle. While most competitors resemble their natural “parents,” America’s latest creation is unique, designed by an ultra-advanced AI that was given one simple operating directive: survive the competition. As the nameless gladiator grows to maturity, it demonstrates feral cunning and intelligence, a taste for human flesh, and a murderous agenda. Now Silas Williams, the head of the U.S. gladiatorial program, and Vidonia João, a brilliant xenobiologist, must unravel the monster’s genetic secrets before things get out of hand. Exacting science and meticulous attention to detail provide the backbone for this thriller, which blends the best of Crichton and Koontz. Agent: Seth Fishman, Sterling Lord Literistic (now at the Gernert Company). (Mar.)

 

Starters (3/13 release)

 

Kirkus Reviews

In a future in which the elderly hold all of the power, the only things left for them to take are the bodies of the young. After a germ-warfare attack, America was only able to vaccinate high-risk groups--medically vulnerable children and senior citizens--in time, creating an age gulf and an orphaned generation. Those without guardians, like Callie and her baby brother, scavenge and sneak to survive, lest marshals catch and throw them in institutions much like prisons. Desperation leads Callie to Prime Destinations, a body-bank that circumvents laws that prohibit minors from working by allowing them to donate their bodies (to be controlled by an elderly renter through neurochips and a brain-to-computer connection) for a stipend. Only one rental away from having the money to care for her ailing brother, Callie finds her chip drastically malfunctioning during a rental, enabling her to take partial control of her body back from a renter who plans on using her for murder. In between living the high life as a socialite grandniece and ward of her wealthy renter, Callie learns of plots more dangerous than the renter's and that only she can stop them. Some exposition is clumsily dropped in through dialogue, and some plot aspects don't hold up to scrutiny, but the twists and turns come so fast that readers will stay hooked. Constantly rising stakes keep this debut intense. (Science fiction. 12 & up)

 

Emperor Mollusk versus The Sinister Brain (3/5 release)

 

Publishers Weekly

With this flashy tale of alien invaders and an evil, time-hopping brain, Martinez (Chasing the Moon) delivers space opera straight out of the pulp era. Emperor Mollusk, benevolent ruler of Earth, has given up his old serial-conqueror lifestyle to settle down as “a de facto god” and “hero of Terra.” When assassins from the Celebrants of Oblivion come calling, he’s forced to take refuge at his stronghold on Dinosaur Island with Snarg, his loyal pet ultrapede, and weapon-toting Venusian commander Zala. Mollusk is pursued by the jar-inhabiting Brain, a villain bent on ruling the universe with the help of a brain gang called the Council of Egos. There’s not much plot to speak of, but killer plants, insane robots, and a dastardly plot to steal the Eiffel Tower provide plenty of slapstick action to entertain readers comfortable with the idea that nearly anything can be fixed by reversing the polarity. Agent: Sally Harding, the Cooke Agency. (Mar.)

 

Jane Carver of Waar (3/20 release) 

 

Publishers Weekly

In this affectionate and often raunchy parody of Edgar Rice Burroughs’s John Carter of Mars books, the slavery-tolerant Confederate veteran pursued by Apaches becomes a proud biker chick on the run from cops for manslaughter. One mysterious transportation later, Jane is on an alien world. Shortly after arriving, Jane gets stuck helping lovestruck aristocrat Sai-Far, whose one true love, Wen-Jhai, has been stolen away by the bold, ambitious Kedac-Zir. Jane is far stronger than any Waar native; by contrast, Sai’s heartfelt dedication to chivalrous romance is in no way matched by prowess or courage. As they quest after Wen-Jhai, Long mocks and critiques elements of space fantasy settings that a son of the Old South like John Carter would never have noticed. Long is sometimes amused, sometimes angered, and very familiar with his source material; his book will appeal to readers who share those characteristics. (Mar.)

 

Range of Ghosts (3/27 release)

 

Publishers Weekly

Bear (Ad Eternum) launches a trilogy in a fantastic new world with this compelling tale. Temur, nephew to the now-dead khan of khans, is a survivor on the losing side of a war between his relatives for the rule of the empire. Fleeing with other refugees, Temur becomes involved with a young woman named Edene, and when she is taken by blood ghosts, he swears he will stop at nothing to get her back. With the help of Samarkar, newly made wizard and Once-Princess of the land of Rasa, and Hrahima, a tiger-woman at odds with her god, Temur has a chance to win his revenge against those who took Edene and murdered an entire city, and perhaps even restore balance to the empire. Bear creates a vivid world where wizards must sacrifice their ability to procreate in order to control magic and the sky changes to reflect the gods of the land’s rulers. The strong setting and engaging characters will have readers eager for the second installment. Agent: Jennifer Jackson, Donald Maass Literary Agency. (Apr.)

 

Tor's Fiction Affliction lists for March releases in Fantasy, Sci-Fi and Genre Benders can be found at these links:

Fiction Affliction: March Releases in Fantasy

Fiction Affliction: March Releases in Science Fiction

Fiction Affliction: Genre-Bender Releases in March