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paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007

OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

!!!LET THE GAMES BEGIN!!!

 

 

Suzanne Collins. If the response to her first two novels, The Hunger Games and Catching Fire,  are any indication, her name will soon be spoken of in the same conversations as J.K. Rowling, Stephenie Meyer, and Jeanne DuPrau. When adults start raving about "young adult" sagas like harry Potter, Twilight or City of Ember, that's when I sit up and take notice. It also helps when dozens of regulars message me to say, "HEY, FEATURE THESE BOOKS!"

 

 

So, without further ado, here is the Suzanne Collins thread. I still have these books on order but I should get them any day and will have them read asap. In the meantime, please feel free to share any and all comments about this series.

 

1. Why is this series soooo appealing? Especially to adults?

2.Is this a dystopian novel? Post-apocalyptic? what's the Message here?

3. When the third installment of the Hunger Games trilogy is released, where do you think this series will be ranked historically will other comparable sagas? It is "classic"?

 

 

Below is a great review for the Hunger Games for PW:

 

 

If there really are only seven original plots in the world, it's odd that "boy meets girl" is always mentioned, and "society goes bad and attacks the good guy" never is. Yet we have Fahrenheit 451, The Giver, The House of the Scorpion-and now, following a long tradition of Brave New Worlds, The Hunger Games.

 

Collins hasn't tied her future to a specific date, or weighted it down with too much finger wagging. Rather less 1984 and rather more Death Race 2000, hers is a gripping story set in a postapocalyptic world where a replacement for the United States demands a tribute from each of its territories: two children to be used as gladiators in a televised fight to the death.

 

Katniss, from what was once Appalachia, offers to take the place of her sister in the Hunger Games, but after this ultimate sacrifice, she is entirely focused on survival at any cost. It is her teammate, Peeta, who recognizes the importance of holding on to one's humanity in such inhuman circumstances. It's a credit to Collins's skill at characterization that Katniss, like a new Theseus, is cold, calculating and still likable. She has the attributes to be a winner, where Peeta has the grace to be a good loser.

 

It's no accident that these games are presented as pop culture. Every generation projects its fear: runaway science, communism, overpopulation, nuclear wars and, now, reality TV. The State of Panem-which needs to keep its tributaries subdued and its citizens complacent-may have created the Games, but mindless television is the real danger, the means by which societypacifies its citizens and punishes those who fail to conform. Will its connection to reality TV, ubiquitous today, date the book? It might, but for now, it makes this the right book at the right time.

 

What happens if we choose entertainment over humanity? In Collins's world, we'll be obsessed with grooming, we'll talk funny, and all our sentences will end with the same rise as questions. When Katniss is sent to stylists to be made more telegenic before she competes, she stands naked in front of them, strangely unembarrassed. "They're so unlike people that I'm no more self-conscious than if a trio of oddly colored birds were pecking around my feet," she thinks. In order not to hate these creatures who are sending her to her death, she imagines them as pets. It isn't just the contestants who risk the loss of their humanity. It is all who watch.

 

 

 

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

[ Edited ]

 

I wonder if adults like these books so much because one of the themes seems really current. The children of the territories are suffering for the past "crimes" of their elders in the failed uprisings. Today, we are facing a situation of possibly burdening our future generations with the payment for our "crime" of a failed economy. The headlines and talking heads keep reminding us of our failures, insisting that the fix will place an undue burden upon our children and grandchildren. Insinuations of coming danger appear nightly on the news. The fight between good and evil is ongoing in our own world. Perhaps we identify because we are all afraid of the apocalypse.
The book touches every human emotion and condition; love, fear, arrogance, courage, deceit, innocence, anger, hate, kindness, tenderness, hostility, violence, retribution, injustice, thoughtfulness, etc., you name it. All of these human conditions are handled beautifully by the characters. The children seem mature and capable, accepting their fate with strength and bravery. Each character exhibits some of these traits, in one way or another, in order to survive and the fight for survival is horrific. Their descriptions allow us to see them in our mind's eye, feeling their pain and fear, joy and grief while tearing at our hearts as we root for one or the other, knowing there can only be one winner.
Although the Hunger Games are brutal and the children do heinous things in order to survive, there are moments of tenderness and compassion as well as violence and horror. These children from the territories never seem to lose their humanity completely while those wreaking havoc upon them seem to have no humanity at all, inflicting loathsome punishments. The powerful are only concerned with retaining power. Doesn't that concept sound familiar? Perhaps on some level we identify with the themes of the book.
The uprising and the fight for justice in the territories, is defeated. The unjust win. However, there is always the underlying hope that right will  make might, against all odds, ultimately. The books are about the two worlds colliding, utopia and dystopia. Utopia is the post-apocalyptic world of Panem and its elite who live in a society that serves all of their needs. They are content but seem naive and shallow, believing the youth want to die for their entertainment. They are self-serving people who subjugate the inhabitiants of the second dystopic nightmare world of the territories, treating their underlings as throwaways, nothing more than playthings. Just as we hope in our own world that things will eventually have a happy ending, we hope for it in this book. We hope the truth will come to light and all will be well, one day.
In some ways both books reminded me of the Holocaust since in the territories and in the Hunger Games, there was a  constant fight for survival by people no longer considered worthwhile or human, who existed in a constant state of deprivation and fear. The Nazis lost, so perhaps we are hoping that in the end, so too will the powers that be in Panem who wield it so brutally. Perhaps we believe that it will mean there is hope for us too!

paulgoatallen wrote:

!!!LET THE GAMES BEGIN!!!

 

 

Suzanne Collins. If the response to her first two novels, The Hunger Games and Catching Fire,  are any indication, her name will soon be spoken of in the same conversations as J.K. Rowling, Stephenie Meyer, and Jeanne DuPrau. When adults start raving about "young adult" sagas like harry Potter, Twilight or City of Ember, that's when I sit up and take notice. It also helps when dozens of regulars message me to say, "HEY, FEATURE THESE BOOKS!

So, without further ado, here is the Suzanne Collins thread. I still have these books on order but I should get them any day and will have them read asap. In the meantime, please feel free to share any and all comments about this series.

 

1. Why is this series soooo appealing? Especially to adults?

2.Is this a dystopian novel? Post-apocalyptic? what's the Message here?

3. When the third installment of the Hunger Games trilogy is released, where do you think this series will be ranked historically will other comparable sagas? It is "classic"?

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

I bumped Hunger Games to the top of my books. I am about 100 pages in to the book.

Great book so far. The Hunger Games set up an good concept for the story. The character descriptions are not overwhelming the story. It was a good mix in this first part of the book, definitely a page turner.

I am glad I set a few books aside to read this. I will get back to those anthologies (another reason why short stories are nice).

pen21

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Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

I am not quite sure as to why adults are so attracted to these books.  I had no desire to read these until friends talked me into them.  I did not like the idea of killing games, let alone having children the center of the whole “game” idea.  However, I listened to friends and picked up the book, and then I couldn’t put it down.

 

I did find it interesting on the section that tells a brief history of how the world fell apart by way of the disasters, droughts, storms, and fires.  This was all talked about on page 18.  It very much reminded me of the predictions of the way the world is to end.  It struck me as post-apocalyptical.  Then what was left was put back together in thirteen districts.

 

I find it interesting to read how others foresee what could happen or what the world could turn to.  Not that these are true visions, just ideas of an alternate world to us.

 

In this world the government takes what is most precious to the people – all they have in this run down world, their children.  The children are the ones to pay for what their ancestors did many years before – fighting against the government.  Not only do the children have to pay as a reminder to the people both young and old, they are a way of torturing the people into what the government wants.

 

So what is the point to this book?  I think there is always another way out of what ever predicament you find yourself in if you think about it.  Could there be another meaning behind it?  I am going to make a stretch here, our shows have become more violent, people seem to enjoy watching violence.  Look at the shows, all this killing and hurting everyone, then look at the sports, the popular ones have a lot of physical harm or the potential of it in them.  The people of the districts seem to not like having to watch these games so I am not sure if the author was using what we are starting to watch so much as to get to another point or if there is a thought here on violence as well.  I was thinking there was something with the way of the government.  I felt that there was a statement being made about the government, but I can’t seem to put my finger on it.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
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Melhay
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Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

I do have to say I loved the characters.  The characters all seemed to stay true to their personalities and the personalities were what we could relate to.  The evil, mean character which we all see out there.  The way Katniss and Peeta react and feel seem so true and real, very human.  I have to admit I got pulled in to the feelings of Katniss and Peeta.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
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Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

***SPOILERS***

 

I have to say I really believed the feelings of the characters.  I truly felt bad for Peeta.  He spilled his heart out through this whole thing to Katniss.  She wasn’t sure if it was real but played it up so they both could live.  Yet, they are both so young yet to be in love.  I almost feel more for Peeta by the end of the book.  Katniss is very clever with her ideas.  She is very smart as well. 

 

I would love to be in District 12 when they get home.  See how their friends and Families react: to them alive & the love thing.  Gale kept popping into my head at times through the book.  What was he going to tell Katniss when he was ushered out of the room before she left for the games?  Was he going to tell her he loved her?  After their strange conversation in the woods of running away together, I started to wonder.  How does Gale feel for Katniss?

 

Is Peeta’s dad in trouble with his mom after what Peeta said of his dad wanting to marry Katniss’s mom?

 

Who, if any boy, does Katniss pick?

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

 

Your question is interesting. I was thinking about and I realized that our reality tv, in some ways, mirrors the days of Rome and The Colosseum when Christians were fed to the lions and gladiators fought to the death. Perhaps the message of the book is that we have gone full circle and humanity has not advanced at all. Maybe it is a warning about our future if we don't rethink our behavior.
Melhay wrote:

Perhaps what is the point to this book?  I think there is always another way out of what ever predicament you find yourself in if you think about it.  Could there be another meaning behind it?  I am going to make a stretch here, our shows have become more violent, people seem to enjoy watching violence.  Look at the shows, all this killing and hurting everyone, then look at the sports, the popular ones have a lot of physical harm or the potential of it in them.  The people of the districts seem to not like having to watch these games so I am not sure if the author was using what we are starting to watch so much as to get to another point or if there is a thought here on violence as well.  I was thinking there was something with the way of the government.  I felt that there was a statement being made about the government, but I can’t seem to put my finger on it.


 

 

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carmen22
Posts: 988
Registered: ‎01-12-2009
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Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

Hey Mel, I have to get going for the night but I'll be back on sometime tomorrow to comment on The Hunger Games and Catching Fire! Oh, and I'm about half way through Catching Fire, and so far it's just AWESOME! Talk to you tomorrow!

 

 

 

Oh and Paul, I hope you enjoy it when you get it! I look forward to seeing what you have to say about it....

_______________________
"Bright colors, Vasher thought. I'll have to get used to those again. In any other nation, the vibrant blues and yellows would have been ridiculous on soldiers. This, however, was Hallandren: land of Returned gods, Lifeless servants, BioChromatic research, and - of course - color." Warbreaker By Brandon Sanderson
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Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008
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Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins


carmen22 wrote:

Hey Mel, I have to get going for the night but I'll be back on sometime tomorrow to comment on The Hunger Games and Catching Fire! Oh, and I'm about half way through Catching Fire, and so far it's just AWESOME! Talk to you tomorrow!

 

 

 

Oh and Paul, I hope you enjoy it when you get it! I look forward to seeing what you have to say about it....


 

Krista,

 

Man, you are way ahead of me.  I am only on pg 163.  I better get moving on this book.  I am just loving it greatly!  Talk to you later.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

***SPOILERS***

 

Okay, I just read pg 172 & 173 in Catching Fire.  I was soooo afraid this was going to be what happens for the Quarter Quell.  This is where my heart just dropped and I almost couldn't believe it. 

 

Wow, they will try anything to get rid of her, huh?

 

I think Haymitch will go as the boy to help save her as long as he can and sacrifice himself in the end for her to win.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

I am about half way through Catching Fire and I just wanted to mention the pacing in both of these books is great.  I read for a little while then want to finish the chapter to go to bed, or go back to work after lunch.  And every time it never fails there is a big climax that happens and I can't put the book down.  I have to read a little further to see what happens.

 

The characters, for some reason, I feel I know very well.  I think that I haven't got a lot of details but I understand the characters wonderfully.  The character developement is well done through the happenings, other characters responces & reactions, and then what they do more than what they say.  I feel I can read into the characters very well and understand why they do what they do. 

 

The story is very straight forward type story but the many climaxes really make me want to keep going and see what the author has in store next and how will they get out of what just occured.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

I have finished the Hunger Games, but am waiting for Catching Fire to be delivered. Dang!

I really agree on the character development. Without pages and pages of who that character is, I feel I know a lot about them. The author did a nice job on that. I like the plot and action to carry the story.

I can see why these books are recommended to everyone. They rearranged the Barnes and Noble store I go to, I had to ask where to find the first book. They should definitely put the books in a more prominent place, or in several places, not just hide them in the Teen section. Which in the new layout was back in the corner by the bathrooms where the craft books used to be.

Anyway I am glad I moved these to the top of the pile, even though I have a lot of really good books waiting there at the top of the pile.

pen21

 

 


Melhay wrote:

I am about half way through Catching Fire and I just wanted to mention the pacing in both of these books is great.  I read for a little while then want to finish the chapter to go to bed, or go back to work after lunch.  And every time it never fails there is a big climax that happens and I can't put the book down.  I have to read a little further to see what happens.

 

The characters, for some reason, I feel I know very well.  I think that I haven't got a lot of details but I understand the characters wonderfully.  The character developement is well done through the happenings, other characters responces & reactions, and then what they do more than what they say.  I feel I can read into the characters very well and understand why they do what they do. 

 

The story is very straight forward type story but the many climaxes really make me want to keep going and see what the author has in store next and how will they get out of what just occured.


 

 

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Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008
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Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

pen21,

 

I hope you get Catching Fire here soon.  That would be a great day when you see it in the mailbox.  I am really happy with this one as well.  I was afraid it would have the middle book syndrome, but it has kept me going... maybe even better than the first one. (and that one was well done!)

 

So, they put the teens in the back corner... Is that a sign?  lol.  I wonder if they moved our store around.  It has been a little while since I have been in.  The last time I was there a few months ago they were moving some of the sections around and spacing them out differently.  I may have to stop and check it out.  Some times I wonder if teen should be devided like regular books too, by genre to find some books a little easier.  It seems to be a growing area in the books store ~ Young Adult.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

Okay, Any thoughts on when the third book will be coming out?  The first one was September 2009 and the first one was October 2008.  Will the third one be in one year?  What do you think?

 

I just can’t leave everyone this way.  I want to read the third and final book to their lives.  I just need to finish the story.

 

I had some pieces placed together at the beginning and some others not.  But even the pieces that I had placed I was still surprised when I read them.  It is the journey of how the author gets there that is fun and makes it worth the ride.  This author really gives you the ride to get there and that is what makes the book.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

Okay, everyone is pulling for someone different in this series.  I have seen many people are Team Peeta.  Katniss seems to be the symbol everyone needs but Peeta is able to do the talking.  They really are a wonderful team.

 

I have to say I love Peeta but I am for Gale for Katniss.  I am starting to wonder though.  Gale has always been Katniss’s rock and person in life.  They just seem to fit together naturally in the real world.  Peeta seems to be that person she is attached to due to a trauma.  Peeta is the one who comforts her with everything dealing with the games.  Even though life after the games has relation to that he is not the one she always wants.  They were thrown together in a terrible time and when that memory comes up he is who she wants there out of habit.  Peeta is a wonderful and good man for Katniss, but it seems that Gale is the one she fits with.  Although, this seems as it could be changing with the way life is since the Games, and even after the Quarter Quell in Catching Fire.

So, who are you for?

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
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melissas
Posts: 392
Registered: ‎05-25-2009

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

1. Why is this series soooo appealing? Especially to adults?

I suppose most of its appeal lies in its morbidity. I hate to use the cliche, but it's like a train wreck...the scenario is awful, but you must see what's happening. I can't speak for most adults, because in general I find teen lit appealing, but if I had to guess it's because of my aforementioned reason, plus the fact that the characters aren't written like teens. There isn't the adolescent drama that appears in many YA books, so adults can relate to the characters more. They are well-written without going on for pages about hair color, chiseled muscles, and the smell of their breath.

 

2.Is this a dystopian novel? Post-apocalyptic? What's the Message here?

I would classify this as dystopian fiction,  considering that it describes an almost nightmarish world which could prophesy reality given the right conditions. I hadn't given too much thought to the message, but I guess my first response would be to say that given the right circumstances, the government could subjugate us with threats of violence, starvation, and other forms of manipulation. Unfortunately, the conditions of the creation Panem are not described elaborately enough to understand the underlying reason that the United States collapsed. So we don't exactly know how the government took control in such a tyrannical way. However, I think some of the answer lies in another message: our willingness to put aside our obligations to humanity (morals, or just common decency) in exchange for having our obsessions with entertainment, glamour, and celebrity satisfied. In fact, watching the live Hunger Games as well as the behind-the-scenes pageantry has zombie-fied many citizens in a way; they are so consumed by it that they no longer realize that people's lives and families are at stake here. Especially as long as it's not their own. Although this is an extreme example of "what if", I think this signifies the idea that American society could easily disregard all murder, violence, starvation, and other malfeasance as long as they are being enchanted by other things.

 

3. When the third installment of the Hunger Games trilogy is released, where do you think this series will be ranked historically will other comparable sagas? It is "classic"?

I loved both of these books (read each in one sitting), and am certain to love the next, but I'm not sure if it's classic. Personally, I hope so, but I just don't know if has a broad enough appeal (despite its appearance on the NYT Bestsellers List). As long as I am a bookseller, I will recommend it with the highest regard, but I think only time will tell with this series. But then again, let's discuss "comparable sagas". I can't think of one!

 

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Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

I was looking through my flags on the books and I found the brief description as to what the book says happened to the United states.  Part of this leads me to think the book may be Post-apocalyptic.  But I soooo see the dystopian novel also.  I don't know now which way I would lean.  Maybe dystopian because that is more of what is detailed in the books, yet the apocalyptic had to happen to get it there.  So, now I am just not sure....*shrugging*

 

But this is found in Hunger Games page 18:

It's the same story every year.  He tells of the history of Panem, the country that rose up out of the ashes of a place that was once called North America.  He lists the disasters, the droughts, the storms, the fires, the encroaching seas that swallowed up so much of the land, the brutal war for what little sustenance remained.  The result was Panem, a shining Capitol ringed by thirteen districts, which brought peace and prosperity to its citizens.  Then came the Dark Days, the uprising of the districts against the Capitol.  Twelve were defeated, the thirteenth obliterated.  The Treaty of Treason gave us the new laws to guarantee peace and, as our yearly reminder that the Dark Days must never be repeated, it gave us the Hunger Games.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
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Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

This is just a thought on the books I had, and was wondering what others thought as well.

 

It appeared to me that more people didn't like or want to do the Games as compared to who wanted to watch them.  The people of the Districts are forced to watch the Games.  Katniss even talks of how they are checked to make sure everyone is in presence of the games and drawings to force them to see as a reminder of the Dark Days.

 

Yet, these poor people are so beat down by the government and have no way to defend themselves against the governments strong men with powerful weapons that could kill instantly.

 

The districts are even arranged so the people can NOT communicate with other districts to work together & uprise at the same time to over power, by number, the government.  I think this is part of the reason Katniss & Peeta where under such heavy guard on tour.  Not for their safety but to keep them from talking rebellion with the different Districts.

 

So, how do you try to over power a powerful government who is always watching over your shoulder & if hears any inckling of an idea of rebellion will kill to stop it before it starts?  (Remember the kiss Katniss had which President Snow is well aware of.  How did he know?  Cameras?)

 

This is part of what I am curious to read about.  I want to know what happened in District 12 and how will they over throw the government? Or will they not?

 

Any thoughts???

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

***SPOILERS - about Catching Fire***

I finished Catching Fire. Definitely a great middle book to a series. It kept me moving through the whole book. Just when I thought there would be a lull after the Victory Tour, the choices for Quarter Quell got the book flying. I am ready for the third book. I have been recommending the books, even to those who don't usually read scifi. They are surprised when I tell them to look in the teen section.

The Games built on human competition to the death are brutal. But there is a balance with the hope of Katniss and Peeta to survive and return to their families. Their families and friends are vital to the characters in the books. What would each of us do if our families were threatened? The Capitol's threat to torture and kill family members drives them to do things they do not agree with. The rebellion in this book brought more momentum to the unrest. I am wondering how the third book will handle how separated the districts are, especially communication between the districts.

Definitely a good book for a wide range of ages.

pen21

Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: OCTOBER FEATURE #3: The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins


pen21 wrote:

***SPOILERS - about Catching Fire***

I finished Catching Fire. Definitely a great middle book to a series. It kept me moving through the whole book. Just when I thought there would be a lull after the Victory Tour, the choices for Quarter Quell got the book flying. I am ready for the third book. I have been recommending the books, even to those who don't usually read scifi. They are surprised when I tell them to look in the teen section.

The Games built on human competition to the death are brutal. But there is a balance with the hope of Katniss and Peeta to survive and return to their families. Their families and friends are vital to the characters in the books. What would each of us do if our families were threatened? The Capitol's threat to torture and kill family members drives them to do things they do not agree with. The rebellion in this book brought more momentum to the unrest. I am wondering how the third book will handle how separated the districts are, especially communication between the districts.

Definitely a good book for a wide range of ages.

pen21


 

Pen, I agree with you.  I am wondering how these districts have worked together or will work together.  I think after they get past their differences that these differences are what will make them survive and win against the Capitol.  Each district has its own specialty to say, and this could be what makes them survive.  I am curious to see how this all works out in the end.  I know they have to be working together in some way to know that they were revolting at the same time.  But how? Who?  I really can't wait to see the "behind the scenes" of the conspiracy. 

 

I am curious as to the people who live in the Capitol as well.  There are some against the Capitol or so it seems and there are others that seem to be just oblivious to the way the rest of the world lives.  I am curious to see how they are affected and who helps or who doesn't.  We already have an idea of a few who are helping but are they enough?

 

I am excited for the next book and as well I have been suggesting these books.

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

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