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paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007

Pleasure Model by Christopher Rowley

[ Edited ]

 

Here's one I've been wavering on – Pleasure Model by Christopher Rowley (pubs February 2, 2010) – the first release from Heavy Metal Pulp, a new imprint from Tor that combines noir fiction and SF themes with artwork a la Heavy Metal magazine. Here's the teaser:

 

 

"In Pleasure Model, the first book in the Netherworld trilogy, down-and out police detective Rook gets a big break when he’s assigned to a bizarre and vicious murder case. The clues are colder than the corpse and the case looks like it’ll remain unsolved—until an eyewitness is discovered. But the witness is a Pleasure Model, an illegal gene-grown human. Plesur’s only purpose is to provide satisfaction to her owner—in any way. When the murderer targets Plesur in order to eliminate the one witness, Rook takes her into hiding to protect her. Thus begins a descent into the dark world of exotic pleasure mods and their illicit buyers and manufacturers. Rook frantically looks for clues, struggling to stay one stop ahead of those looking to kill them both. But is Rook falling under Plesur’s spell….?"

 

Sounds awesome, right? But then I read the PW review and started having second thoughts. Here's some excerpts:

 

"There's little to like in the ugly and cliché-driven world Rowley (Arkham Woods) creates to launch Tor's Heavy Metal Pulp line..."

 

"Even readers who can tolerate the hackneyed dialogue, overt misogyny, and predictable violence will be annoyed by the utterly unresolved ending. B&W illustrations by Justin Norman mostly serve to pad the story and emphasize its cartoonish nature."

 

What do you think about this illustrated novel? Do you want to read it or not?

 

Paul

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007
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Re: Pleasure Model by Christopher Rowley

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008

Re: Pleasure Model by Christopher Rowley

Ok A few questions about the review you read. Reviewer male or female? Has the review ever read and enjoyed a single issue of HM the mag before?

 

Ok so cliche perhaps... that vid clip bit with the author ... not exactly a new story line. See sort of recent anime "Ergo Proxy"

Ergo Proxy: Box Set  See also

Appleseed

  

 

 

 

there are more than a few versions of this basic story model floating about. But I wouldn't exactly call it cliche.

 

 

AND what did they mean by cartoonish nature?

Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007
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Re: Pleasure Model by Christopher Rowley

 


TiggerBear wrote:

Ok A few questions about the review you read. Reviewer male or female? Has the review ever read and enjoyed a single issue of HM the mag before?

 

Ok so cliche perhaps... that vid clip bit with the author ... not exactly a new story line. See sort of recent anime "Ergo Proxy"

Ergo Proxy: Box Set  See also

Appleseed

  

 

 

 

there are more than a few versions of this basic story model floating about. But I wouldn't exactly call it cliche.

 

 

AND what did they mean by cartoonish nature?


 

 

Tig:

Don't take this the wrong way but I love you! That comment was exactly what I needed to read! You're absolutely right.

 

I'm going to make Pleasure Model the #3 feature for March. Because, honestly, even if it's fantastic or just plain okay, I think the discussion about why Tor Books is spending all of this time and money beginning this imprint is pretty significant as far as the future of SF/fantasy is concerned. Agreed?

 

Paul

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008

Re: Pleasure Model by Christopher Rowley

 


paulgoatallen wrote:

 


TiggerBear wrote:

Ok A few questions about the review you read. Reviewer male or female? Has the review ever read and enjoyed a single issue of HM the mag before?

 

Ok so cliche perhaps... that vid clip bit with the author ... not exactly a new story line. See sort of recent anime "Ergo Proxy"

Ergo Proxy: Box Set  See also

Appleseed

  

 

 

 

there are more than a few versions of this basic story model floating about. But I wouldn't exactly call it cliche.

 

 

AND what did they mean by cartoonish nature?


 

 

Tig:

Don't take this the wrong way but I love you! That comment was exactly what I needed to read! You're absolutely right.

 

I'm going to make Pleasure Model the #3 feature for March. Because, honestly, even if it's fantastic or just plain okay, I think the discussion about why Tor Books is spending all of this time and money beginning this imprint is pretty significant as far as the future of SF/fantasy is concerned. Agreed?

 

Paul


 

 

:smileyhappy: Ok

 

Tor so rarely does anything mediocre, so them picking it up should mean something. And yes, very much agree.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: Pleasure Model by Christopher Rowley

[ Edited ]

I read this book and really enjoyed it. I like all the hi-tech gizmos and the use of vat grown sex toys (both female and male) who have baseline IQs and maximum life spans of 10 years. The novel has a lot in common with Blade Runner, but it has a more hard-boiled edge with a 'good' cop protecting the pleasure model as evidence and, then, getting caught up in a military/political conspiracy with multiple assailants taking pot shots at him and his companions while he tries to find out why a retired black ops general was killed. I'm going to read the follow-up Bloodstained Man when I get a chance.

 

Note, the narrative is periodically enlivened by really good illustrations scattered over the course of the book.

 

Also note that sexuality/sexual attraction is a periodic theme because the genetically engineered pleasure model is designed to appeal to the male heterosexual libido and the male protagonist happens to be heterosexual. But, the actual sex scene is pretty inconsequential and involves a third party.    

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
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Re: Pleasure Model by Christopher Rowley

 


dalnewt wrote:

I read this book and really enjoyed it. I like all the hi-tech gizmos and the use of vat grown sex toys (both female and male) who have baseline IQs and maximum life spans of 10 years. The novel has a lot in common with Blade Runner, but it has a more hard-boiled edge with a 'good' cop protecting the pleasure model as evidence and, then, getting caught up in a military/political conspiracy with multiple assailants taking pot shots at him and his companions while he tries to find out why a retired black ops general was killed. I'm going to read the follow-up Bloodstained Man when I get a chance.

 

Note, the narrative is periodically enlivened by really good illustrations scattered over the course of the book.

 

Also note that sexuality/sexual attraction is a periodic theme because the genetically engineered pleasure model is designed to appeal to the male heterosexual libido and the male protagonist happens to be heterosexual. But, the actual sex scene is pretty inconsequential and involves a third party.    


 

See folks when you try books a little out of your comfort zone, often you end up happily surprised.:smileyvery-happy:

 

Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007
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Re: Pleasure Model by Christopher Rowley

One of my biggest disappointments – as far as the F/SF forum goes – is my "failure" of getting more readers to try (and enjoy) books like Rowley's Netherworld saga.

 

I know I got this one right – "It’s like Blade Runner on a mind-blowing cocktail of steroids, Viagra, and crystal meth" – and it was really disappointing to see the lack of turnout on both of the Netherworld threads.

 

I think it's yet another indication that the majority of today's F/SF readers are now reading fantasy and not science fiction. Sad...

 

Paul

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky