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Frequent Contributor
EinsteinPD
Posts: 235
Registered: ‎05-08-2012
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Science Question/Problem - Swimming on the Moon.

I have posteds a science question/problem on my website Philduke.weebly.com. The MOON Base colonists have constructed an underground swimming pool on the Moon, and the question/problem relates to their swimming in it. The best answer will be Posted, and receive a gifted ebook of mine. Hint: The Moon's gravity is one-sixth that of Earth's. Good luck!

 

Phillip Duke Ph.D.

 

MOON Base Colony  

MOON Base Colony  

Frequent Contributor
EinsteinPD
Posts: 235
Registered: ‎05-08-2012
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Re: Science Question/Problem - Swimming on the Moon.

Either there is no interest, or no one is willing to tackle this relatively simple (but to my mind interesting) problem in hydrostatics. I thought at least ManuelGarcia would give it a try. Here is something hopefully helpful .

 

Archimedes of Syracuse discovered the law of buoyancy named after him. It states the following: "An object immersed in a fluid experiences a buoyant/upward force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced."

 

Come on, all you science experts, let's see what you can do with this relatively simple problem. You were quick enougfh to criticize my book "Starship To New Earth Now." ManuelGarcia gave it a two star review supposedly based on his calculations regarding the propulsion system. I have repeatedly asked him to please send me the calculations, so that I could include them in a new, revised edition of the book. I never received them.

 

Since the two star review of "Starship To New Earth Now" is based on calculations that ManuelGarcia will not provide me, it becomes evident that the review is actually based on spite, and is due to my refusal to simply accept his statement that the propulsion system is inadequate. This being so it is a spite review, and should be removed. Therefore I ask ManuelGarcia to please remove the review, or send me the calculations justifying it. If he will do neither, I will ask Support to remove the review.

 

Phillip Duke Ph.D.

 

Correspondent
ManuelGarcia
Posts: 83
Registered: ‎12-25-2009

Re: Science Question/Problem - Swimming on the Moon.

[ Edited ]

I posted the math of Tsiolkovsky rocket equation in the Buck Rogers thread and emailed it to you. So I stand by my review.

Frequent Contributor
EinsteinPD
Posts: 235
Registered: ‎05-08-2012
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Re: Science Question/Problem - Swimming on the Moon.

ManuelGarcia, I never received the email, please send it again to drpduke@wmconnect.com. It may be futile at this time to say again as I have before, that I respect your expertise, and your calculations may be correct. And, that my ebook "Starship to New Earth Now" is intended to get across the concept that a starship is theoretically feasible, when at present essentially no one except me thinks this. I believe that once the concept is considered feasible, a satisfactory propulsion system of some kind would soon be developed, and become available.

 

When the Wright Brothers were finally ready to put a gasoline engine on their final glider, "The Flyer" nothing  available was suitable. So they designed the engine (and the propellers, and the control system) themselves. And it flew!

 

Why don't you solve the "Swimming on the MOON" problem, and send me the answer? With your scientific knowledge I expect it will be easy..

 

Best regards,

 

Phillip Duke Ph.D.

Wrught Brothers.jpg

Correspondent
ManuelGarcia
Posts: 83
Registered: ‎12-25-2009

Re: Science Question/Problem - Swimming on the Moon.

[ Edited ]

I got a reply from you about my email to you on 2/26/13.  But it doesn't matter, the email I sent is just a copy of what I posted in the Buck Rodger's thread.  Feel free to use any of it. The Tsiolkovsky rocketequation is as well know as Einstein's e=mc²

 
Yes the Wright brothers knew the engine requirement and built one. The same way the Icarus Interstellar Project  and 100 Year Starship project know the requirements for Interstellar travel and are working on engine designs that meet the requirements.

As for swimming on the moon, just google "swimming on the moon" and you will find this question has been asked and answered before.

Correspondent
ManuelGarcia
Posts: 83
Registered: ‎12-25-2009

Re: Science Question/Problem - Swimming on the Moon.

[ Edited ]

I wish I had time to go to The Icarus Interstellar Starship Congress to get information from people that understand the math of what is required. I did sent them a few bucks via kickstarter to get a Build a Star Ship T-Shirt.