Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Author
kenscholes
Posts: 136
Registered: ‎10-17-2008
0 Kudos

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes *spoilers*

Ha!  And I have a short story coming out in a few months called "Love in the Time of Car Alarms."  An intentional play on words.  :smileyhappy:
Frequent Contributor
Jon_B
Posts: 1,893
Registered: ‎07-15-2008
0 Kudos

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes *spoilers*


kenscholes wrote:
Ha!  And I have a short story coming out in a few months called "Love in the Time of Car Alarms."  An intentional play on words.  :smileyhappy:
Sounds like something that would fit on our Mashups board :smileyhappy:

 

________________________________________

Need some help setting up your My B&N profile? Click here!

Looking for a particular book, but can't remember the title or author? Ask about it here!
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes *spoilers*


kenscholes wrote:
Ha!  And I have a short story coming out in a few months called "Love in the Time of Car Alarms."  An intentional play on words.  :smileyhappy:

I love it already! Will you be posting it on your website?

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes


Melhay wrote:

I to did pick up on the religious aspect, it did appear to me also.  However, the further I got in the book I realized the normal thinking of religion we think of; being a worship of a or many God(s) or the Catholic or a type, was not what was present.  It was more of the structure of the Androfrancines city and life in what they do and how they do it.  The worship of "the light" and to protect it along with its people (which is all the people).

-----------------------------------

 

Shortly into the story I also didn't think of this as a religion at all. It was based on a religious structure and that was about it. It seems more like just a political system -- a way to organize a scholarly pursuit and a government. It kind of reminds me of Plato's "Philosopher King." The "Pope" essentially was a Philosopher King.

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes


carmen22 wrote:

 

  I think Winters cares alot about Neb and has them watch over him I don't think he is supposed to know they are there. Thats just what I think!

 

This is just a guess on the other questions but I think When Neb first does it I think he was just so traumatized by whats happened and with Winters I just thought they were Nevous or something but good question!!!

 

        I also think and hope Winters will have a bigger part in the books to come!!!

 

              Carmen


 I'm sure we will get to know more about the mysterious Marshers as we get deeper into the series. Right now I my working theory is they had to do more with the events then seem apparent so far. I think Neb is an important part of "their" plan. In fact the fact that Neb breaks into this strange language under stress and has prophetic dreams, and mind-links with Winters is making me wonder if Neb is not a Marsher himself. Some nagging loose ends in my head are that we really don't know who Neb's father was (or his mother), he was moved out of harms way in a curious coincidence (was it deliberate?), he was left to witness the destruction (a traumatic effect and standard practice of the Queen's Game players in grooming and moving forward the players), brought to the Marshers camp and is being watched over by them. We don't even know for sure if Brother Hebda is dead. He may have just conveniently have left Neb for the traumatic effect. It seems strange that Brother Hebda didn't check on something so important as the letters of introduction and credit (which was one of the first things Petronous looked for as soon as they were safely away), and possibly removed them himself for a convenient excuse. In fact Ken has left lots of loose end indicating that Sethbert may not have been the one ultimately responsible for the destruction of Windwir, but only a player.

 I can see that my copy of Lamentation is going to be pretty dog-eared by the time Canticle is out.

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes

Ken, I know that many books and happenings in your life went into the writing of this series. But I was curious if there was a single event or book that greatly influenced your thinking and/or the construction of the series?
Inspired Scribe
carmen22
Posts: 988
Registered: ‎01-12-2009

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes


Nadine wrote:

 I'm sure we will get to know more about the mysterious Marshers as we get deeper into the series. Right now I my working theory is they had to do more with the events then seem apparent so far. I think Neb is an important part of "their" plan. In fact the fact that Neb breaks into this strange language under stress and has prophetic dreams, and mind-links with Winters is making me wonder if Neb is not a Marsher himself. Some nagging loose ends in my head are that we really don't know who Neb's father was (or his mother), he was moved out of harms way in a curious coincidence (was it deliberate?), he was left to witness the destruction (a traumatic effect and standard practice of the Queen's Game players in grooming and moving forward the players), brought to the Marshers camp and is being watched over by them. We don't even know for sure if Brother Hebda is dead. He may have just conveniently have left Neb for the traumatic effect. It seems strange that Brother Hebda didn't check on something so important as the letters of introduction and credit (which was one of the first things Petronous looked for as soon as they were safely away), and possibly removed them himself for a convenient excuse. In fact Ken has left lots of loose end indicating that Sethbert may not have been the one ultimately responsible for the destruction of Windwir, but only a player.

 I can see that my copy of Lamentation is going to be pretty dog-eared by the time Canticle is out.


  I know it did say why they had to place Neb in the orphanage was because they wanted to hide the fact that Brother Hebda had a son and wasn't betrothed. It does make you wonder to because Brother Hebda is also in Nebs dreams showing him the way, so maybe your right and he might have some Marsher blood or something. I agree he did leave alot lots of loose ends like the Gold Bird and where Vald is going to find out and Kill the Person who had it and sent it into Windwir. And I'm also not convinced Sethbert was the main player in the down fall of Windwir!!

 

_______________________
"Bright colors, Vasher thought. I'll have to get used to those again. In any other nation, the vibrant blues and yellows would have been ridiculous on soldiers. This, however, was Hallandren: land of Returned gods, Lifeless servants, BioChromatic research, and - of course - color." Warbreaker By Brandon Sanderson
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes


carmen22 wrote:

  I know it did say why they had to place Neb in the orphanage was because they wanted to hide the fact that Brother Hebda had a son and wasn't betrothed. It does make you wonder to because Brother Hebda is also in Nebs dreams showing him the way, so maybe your right and he might have some Marsher blood or something. I agree he did leave alot lots of loose ends like the Gold Bird and where Vald is going to find out and Kill the Person who had it and sent it into Windwir. And I'm also not convinced Sethbert was the main player in the down fall of Windwir!!

 


Carmen:
It does make you wonder to because Brother Hebda is also in Nebs dreams showing him the way...
---------------------------------------

 

Oh, good point! I missed that one. Do you happen to remember what page that was on?

That Gold Bird is pretty significant but I did not note much about it within the story as I went through it the first time. I'm trying to note references to it as I reread the book. The very short tight Postlude has volumes to say. I'm also looking for "scarlet sleeves"!

 

Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes

[ Edited ]

Nadine wrote:

carmen22 wrote:

  I know it did say why they had to place Neb in the orphanage was because they wanted to hide the fact that Brother Hebda had a son and wasn't betrothed. It does make you wonder to because Brother Hebda is also in Nebs dreams showing him the way, so maybe your right and he might have some Marsher blood or something. I agree he did leave alot lots of loose ends like the Gold Bird and where Vald is going to find out and Kill the Person who had it and sent it into Windwir. And I'm also not convinced Sethbert was the main player in the down fall of Windwir!!

 


Carmen:
It does make you wonder to because Brother Hebda is also in Nebs dreams showing him the way...
---------------------------------------

 

Oh, good point! I missed that one. Do you happen to remember what page that was on?


Nadine

 

Page 161.  See my notes came in handy. :smileywink: (giving myself a pat on the back.)  Sorry, I had a moment.  The first dream of Brother Hebda is page 161. 

 

I was starting to think that maybe you all had something with Hebda maybe being alive.  Since Winters and Neb are not dead and dream of each other.  That is a possiblity.  But then there is a line that "Death was unkind to Brother Hebda.  He'd lost weight and his features sagged with the weight of despair."  This could be the weight of grief for him.  We shall wait and see in the next book.

 

Melissa

Message Edited by Melhay on 03-12-2009 11:02 PM
_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes

Mel Wrote:
Petronus was one of my favorite characters.  He felt he was living a lie, I wanted to tell him he just had a broader mind.  I felt he could see more 'out of the box'.  He was not one that was stuck in one way of life.  He saw there was more things to life and other ways to approach the way things are done or handled.  He was a man ready for change with a wider view stuck in a world of many people set in one way, the old way - the backward dream.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

I really admired Petronus. He seemed like the most moral person in the book with his "abdication" by suicide of the Papacy, his distress at the destruction of Windwir, his devotion to the task of burying all the dead, his selfless devotion to the future by taking on the Papacy again. But on this second reading, I started wondering about him. (I seem to be getting suspicious of everyone.). Some nagging questions. Why did he order the utter destruction of Marshers village--their actions didn't quite seem to warrant such drastic action? Why did he give up the Papacy? Was there more to his rescuing Neb (and risking himself doing it) or was it an act of kindness toward a boy he didn't know. And why did he immediately want to find the letters of introduction and credit (everything is coded in this book). Petronous seems to know more about what happened, how and why. After all he had been Pope and he felt that if he still was he could have prevented it. And some of his actions at the end of the book totally threw me. He suddenly seemed like one of the Queen's Game players and manipulating events. He killed Sethbert on the spot with his own hands. Was that to prevent him from ever reveling something? Stay tuned. I think we are going to encounter many more surprises with Petronus. It may all be positive and I hope so.
Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes

Carmen mentioned about lose ends with Vlad Li Tam and the Gold Bird.  I completely agree!!  I don't think we have heard the last of Vlad at all.  He was so in depth with all the "plans".  Amaizing on how the deception and schemeing he, his father, and fathers father, and so on have done and been involved in.  (based on the size of his personal library he was burning, and the size of the fire.) 

 

I did have a few questions pop into my head with this Golden Bird also.  Why would he send the Golden Bird to the new library knowing its scrolls were altered to implicate him for the destruction of Windwir?  This would make him look like the bad guy and possibly dishonor the Li Tam House.  Then, this question came up in the book between Isaak and Petronus, Why was the bird damaged so badly & not the Mechoservitors, particularly Isaak?  Are the materials the Mechoservitors made of stronger against the heat and fire?  I really wondered if the bird had something to do with the spell, then I read the Prelude again and thought against it.

 

I think even though Vlad 'looks' broken and sounds as though he feels broken at the time of leaving he has many ideas for the future.  With him off searching for who or what is out there that changed the scrolls and tiped him off, he will be back.  He may be the one to pull everyone; Petronus Rudolfo, Jin, Neb, & etc. together again without them even knowing it to protect against who ever is out there.  Do you think he still has tricks up his sleeves?  Who or what do you think is out there?

 

What a web we weave...

 

I was wondering if Ken had any difficulty or more fun in creating Vlad?  He has to be tied to everyone to be able to manipulate them the way he did.

 

Mel

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Inspired Scribe
carmen22
Posts: 988
Registered: ‎01-12-2009

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes


Nadine wrote:

I really admired Petronus. He seemed like the most moral person in the book with his "abdication" by suicide of the Papacy, his distress at the destruction of Windwir, his devotion to the task of burying all the dead, his selfless devotion to the future by taking on the Papacy again. But on this second reading, I started wondering about him. (I seem to be getting suspicious of everyone.). Some nagging questions. Why did he order the utter destruction of Marshers village--their actions didn't quite seem to warrant such drastic action? Why did he give up the Papacy? Was there more to his rescuing Neb (and risking himself doing it) or was it an act of kindness toward a boy he didn't know. And why did he immediately want to find the letters of introduction and credit (everything is coded in this book). Petronous seems to know more about what happened, how and why. After all he had been Pope and he felt that if he still was he could have prevented it. And some of his actions at the end of the book totally threw me. He suddenly seemed like one of the Queen's Game players and manipulating events. He killed Sethbert on the spot with his own hands. Was that to prevent him from ever reveling something? Stay tuned. I think we are going to encounter many more surprises with Petronus. It may all be positive and I hope so.

  I'm not so sure I agree with you here about Petronous but he might know a little more than he lets on but I just don't think he helped with it!!

 

  Why did he order the utter destruction of Marshers village--their actions didn't quite seem to warrant such drastic action? Why did he give up the Papacy?

    I think the reason he left because of what he did to the Marshers he didn't realize what he was doing until he went and seen first hand the Villiage in ruins thats when he decide to leave.

 

He killed Sethbert on the spot with his own hands. Was that to prevent him from ever reveling something?

  He had to kill Sethbert so there wouldn't be antother as pope the pope couldn't have blood on his hands and when he killed Sethbert he could no longer be the Pope. He knew that Neb would try so he wouldn't let him because he knew the role of Pope had to come to and end.

 

Carmen 

_______________________
"Bright colors, Vasher thought. I'll have to get used to those again. In any other nation, the vibrant blues and yellows would have been ridiculous on soldiers. This, however, was Hallandren: land of Returned gods, Lifeless servants, BioChromatic research, and - of course - color." Warbreaker By Brandon Sanderson
Inspired Scribe
carmen22
Posts: 988
Registered: ‎01-12-2009

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes


Melhay wrote:

 

I did have a few questions pop into my head with this Golden Bird also.  Why would he send the Golden Bird to the new library knowing its scrolls were altered to implicate him for the destruction of Windwir?  This would make him look like the bad guy and possibly dishonor the Li Tam House.  Then, this question came up in the book between Isaak and Petronus, Why was the bird damaged so badly & not the Mechoservitors, particularly Isaak?  Are the materials the Mechoservitors made of stronger against the heat and fire?  I really wondered if the bird had something to do with the spell, then I read the Prelude again and thought against it.

 

Mel


 

In had all those same questions as well when I was finished but I'm sure they will be addressed in the next book or at least I hope so!

 

Do you think he still has tricks up his sleeves?  Who or what do you think is out there?

   Oh yes I think he does but what I do not know!! And who I can't wait to find out LOL!!

_______________________
"Bright colors, Vasher thought. I'll have to get used to those again. In any other nation, the vibrant blues and yellows would have been ridiculous on soldiers. This, however, was Hallandren: land of Returned gods, Lifeless servants, BioChromatic research, and - of course - color." Warbreaker By Brandon Sanderson
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes

Great observations, Mel. Some of these questions have been coming up in my mind but you have opened up a lot of new possibilities. I've been noting some of these on my reread but maybe I should refresh my mind with the ending again now. Everything happened so fast and much was totally unexpected.
I too was wondering how come the mechoservitors were not damaged at all when everything else was and why the bird was damaged. That bird seems like an important clue. And I don't remember now how he got to all the places and his relationship to Vlad Li Tam (or someother Watcher). (I am now writing down a thousand times -- "I will remember to take notes!)"
 I do think that some of the action in the next book will be shifting to the area southeast of the Named Lands. I believe that is where Vlad was heading, the bird ended up in the Postlude, and Ken has already dropped the hint somewhere in the thread that there is a back story about Rudolpho and Gregory among the Pirates coming up.
I'm going to take some time and follow up on some of your great ideas, here. I think you have hit upon some important clues and observations.
Ken is probably chuckling over all our analysis. But he did mention that his book was part mystery. And the series is half written and, since it is finite story that seems to be well planned out to his known ending, I think clues (and red herring) has already been dropped into this first book. He is still just inventing the details of how he gets there. So there has to be "method" in all of this.

Melhay wrote:

Carmen mentioned about lose ends with Vlad Li Tam and the Gold Bird.  I completely agree!!  I don't think we have heard the last of Vlad at all.  He was so in depth with all the "plans".  Amaizing on how the deception and schemeing he, his father, and fathers father, and so on have done and been involved in.  (based on the size of his personal library he was burning, and the size of the fire.) 

 

I did have a few questions pop into my head with this Golden Bird also.  Why would he send the Golden Bird to the new library knowing its scrolls were altered to implicate him for the destruction of Windwir?  This would make him look like the bad guy and possibly dishonor the Li Tam House.  Then, this question came up in the book between Isaak and Petronus, Why was the bird damaged so badly & not the Mechoservitors, particularly Isaak?  Are the materials the Mechoservitors made of stronger against the heat and fire?  I really wondered if the bird had something to do with the spell, then I read the Prelude again and thought against it.

 

I think even though Vlad 'looks' broken and sounds as though he feels broken at the time of leaving he has many ideas for the future.  With him off searching for who or what is out there that changed the scrolls and tiped him off, he will be back.  He may be the one to pull everyone; Petronus Rudolfo, Jin, Neb, & etc. together again without them even knowing it to protect against who ever is out there.  Do you think he still has tricks up his sleeves?  Who or what do you think is out there?

 

What a web we weave...

 

I was wondering if Ken had any difficulty or more fun in creating Vlad?  He has to be tied to everyone to be able to manipulate them the way he did.

 

Mel


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes

[ Edited ]

I skimmed through some of Ken's posting here to pull together some interesting statements about where the story is going.

 

===============================

 

Miscellaneous Notes from Ken from this forum:

In Canticle, we learn Rudolfo and Gregoric sailed with a pirate/smuggler during their youth.

-------

There are a few bits that I've planned but nothing so elaborate as a puzzle that unlocks the story.  I was just writing far too quickly on Lamentation to plan that deeply, but my subconcious did some of that for me.  There are a few places where I "put a pistol on the mantle" so-to-speak, something that should be used later to forward the story, and then, in reading over the book, saw the "pistol" and thought "Aha, something to use in book 2 or book 3...."  So there's a part of this that's very concious and deliberate.  Then there's an organic part that grows as I do the work and read later on what my subconcious was up to.

-----------

While I have the grand arc of the story figured out there are a lot of bits and pieces that will come together for me as I'm writing.  My process is a combination of a big picture plan and lots of little picture details that come together organically as I'm caught up in the writing.

--------------------

I do consider Psalms of Isaak post-apocalyptic though I'm starting to wonder if the book isn't a bit cross-functional when it comes to genre.  It reads like epic fantasy, I'm told, and certainly my protagonists believe they're in a fantasy.  But if 'technology out of control' is the trope of a technothriller, and Isaak is a technological wonder turned weapon, then there are also bits of the technothriller and maybe some mystery, too. 

-------------------

Right now, there's also another tie in story at Tor.com (I think I linked to it in my introduction here), set about 4,000 years earlier, called "A Weeping Czar Beholds the Fallen Moon."  It ties in particularly to Canticle but it also fleshes out some of the history and mythology of the age before the reign of the wizard kings.


[I printed this out to read and then forgot about it. I think I will dig this out and read it.]

-------------

There is definitely something afoot between her [Winters] and Neb with the ecstatic utterances and prophetic dreams.  And something afoot with the kin-clave between the Marsh and the Ninefold Forest.  More coming on that in CANTICLE and subsequent books. 

-------------------------------------------------------------

From the editor Beth


And as Ken said, re-reading LAMENTATION after having read CANTICLE and the first bit of ANTIPHON puts a whole new light on many things.  I love these books anyway, but it's a joy to discover just how much the series is going to reward re-reading.

Message Edited by Nadine on 03-13-2009 10:57 AM
Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008
0 Kudos

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes


Nadine wrote:
I too was wondering how come the mechoservitors were not damaged at all when everything else was and why the bird was damaged. That bird seems like an important clue. And I don't remember now how he got to all the places and his relationship to Vlad Li Tam (or someother Watcher). (I am now writing down a thousand times -- "I will remember to take notes!)"
Ken is probably chuckling over all our analysis. But he did mention that his book was part mystery. And the series is half written and, since it is finite story that seems to be well planned out to his known ending, I think clues (and red herring) has already been dropped into this first book. He is still just inventing the details of how he gets there. So there has to be "method" in all of this.


 


Taking notes does take a little longer to get through the book, but it helps me to understand more what I am reading.  When I have a question I write it down then when I get the answer I write the page number by it with a small note.  Or if I think something is important I will note it.

 

I do hope Ken is getting a good kick out of this.  I know I am really enjoying myself with this discussion.  I enjoy hearing and talking over different point of views.  To me it helps make a great book all that much better.

 

I will have to review every thing from all these posts, my notes, and the book again.  You all have brought up very good views and I want to look into them more.

 

Mel

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Contributor
JohnAPitts
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎03-05-2009
0 Kudos

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes

Hello.  John Pitts here.  I'm a member of Ken's Team 4J.

 

I've read almost everything Ken has written, much less published. :smileyhappy:

 

I'm lucky enough to read all of this series as it is being created.  It's amazing stuff.  You are going to love, love Canticle (and Antiphon)... Of course, I'm confident in the whole series, but I haven't read what he hasn't written.

 

Great stuff.

Bibliophile
Melhay
Posts: 2,062
Registered: ‎12-11-2008
0 Kudos

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes

Thanks for pulling together the notes from Ken in the thread.  That was one of the things I was going to do, with my notes.  I have been really thinking hard over what he wrote and thinking on the new book.

 

This discussion is really making me more excited for Canticle.  When is it coming out?  I think I read in a post by Beth the editor something about 6 months apart?  It may have been in another thread somewhere else though.

 

Mel

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

My Blog Spot: http://melissa-melsworld.blogspot.com/
Inspired Scribe
carmen22
Posts: 988
Registered: ‎01-12-2009
0 Kudos

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes

I hope it comes out sooner than later that's for sure LOL!! I'm so looking forward to it!!

_______________________
"Bright colors, Vasher thought. I'll have to get used to those again. In any other nation, the vibrant blues and yellows would have been ridiculous on soldiers. This, however, was Hallandren: land of Returned gods, Lifeless servants, BioChromatic research, and - of course - color." Warbreaker By Brandon Sanderson
Inspired Bibliophile
Nelsmom
Posts: 2,628
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: MARCH FEATURE #1: Lamentation by Ken Scholes

Found Beth's message and she said ARC's come out sometime in April or early May and the book comes out sometime in June or July.  I'm just hoping we get a first read when the ARC's come out so Paul doesn't get to spend a few month's gloating over the fact that he is getting an ARC.  Not that he shouldn't get one I just want to gloat with him.

 

Toni

Toni L. Chapman
Everyone needs some Tender Loving Care