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jmanrique
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Best Dialogue ... and the award goes to?

As a reader and a writer I love crisp, smart and snappy dialogue. In the category of General Fiction, my award for best dialogue would go to Elmore Leonard - his delivery is so sharp, natural and cool. Two of his best are Tishomingo Blues and Rum Punch.

I would like to hear what y'all think. Who is your favorite dialogue writer? Favorite title?
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becke_davis
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Re: Best Dialogue ... and the award goes to?



jmanrique wrote:
As a reader and a writer I love crisp, smart and snappy dialogue. In the category of General Fiction, my award for best dialogue would go to Elmore Leonard - his delivery is so sharp, natural and cool. Two of his best are Tishomingo Blues and Rum Punch.

I would like to hear what y'all think. Who is your favorite dialogue writer? Favorite title?




Can I get a little girly here? From a female standpoint, I like the way Nora Roberts and Jennifer Crusie write dialogue. From the standpoint of general fiction, Robert Parker (Spencer) comes to mind.
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jmanrique
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Re: Best Dialogue ... and the award goes to?



becke_davis wrote:


jmanrique wrote:
As a reader and a writer I love crisp, smart and snappy dialogue. In the category of General Fiction, my award for best dialogue would go to Elmore Leonard - his delivery is so sharp, natural and cool. Two of his best are Tishomingo Blues and Rum Punch.

I would like to hear what y'all think. Who is your favorite dialogue writer? Favorite title?




Can I get a little girly here? From a female standpoint, I like the way Nora Roberts and Jennifer Crusie write dialogue. From the standpoint of general fiction, Robert Parker (Spencer) comes to mind.




I'm not familiar with Robert Parker. Which title would you suggest I check out?

When I'm ready to get girly, I'll hit you up for recommendations on Nora Roberts and Jennifer Cruise titles? Thanks!
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becke_davis
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Re: Best Dialogue ... and the award goes to?

[ Edited ]
Robert Parker has written so many books I couldn't begin to count them. His most famous series features a detective called Spencer. He has two other detective series, one featuring Sunny Randall and one featuring Jesse Stone. The Spencer books were the basis of the old TV series Spencer: For Hire that starred Robert Urich. There is a more recent series of made-for-TV movies with Tom Selleck starring in the Jesse Stone role. It seems to me there was a more recent Spencer TV movie starring Joe Mantegna, too.

I like all three series but the Spencer books are by far the most popular. You don't actually have to start reading them in chronological order (there are a LOT of books in this series), but there are several recurring characters and it might make things clearer if you read them in order, even if you miss some books that fall in between. I don't know if I really have a favorite. I guess the books that fall somewhere in the middle of the publication timeline were my favorites -- I miss Pearl (Spencer's dog, who dies of old age late in the series).

Message Edited by becke_davis on 09-10-2007 12:27 AM
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Everyman
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Re: Best Dialogue ... and the award goes to?



becke_davis wrote:
From the standpoint of general fiction, Robert Parker (Spencer) comes to mind.


I'll agree with that. His dialogue is realistic, crisp, and fun to read.
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ABI
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Re: Best Dialogue ... and the award goes to?

Best dialogue...tough. Er, I would say Sarah Dunant - in her historical fiction she manages to really portray the language that might have been used during the time period; then Tracy Chevelier(sp?) (especially in Falling Angels for the realism of her younger characters), or Jeffrey Eugenides(sp?) - for his blatantly true style.
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kiakar
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Re: Best Dialogue ... and the award goes to?



ABI wrote:
Best dialogue...tough. Er, I would say Sarah Dunant - in her historical fiction she manages to really portray the language that might have been used during the time period; then Tracy Chevelier(sp?) (especially in Falling Angels for the realism of her younger characters), or Jeffrey Eugenides(sp?) - for his blatantly true style.




Yes, You mentioned some great ones for diaglog.
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verbatim
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Re: Best Dialogue ... and the award goes to?

Oscar Wilde, hands down.
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becke_davis
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Re: Best Dialogue ... and the award goes to?

Contemporary author? Jennifer Crusie.
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Kinsasha
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Re: Best Dialogue ... and the award goes to?

Robert Parker and Elmore Leonard are both great authors. If you want film noir, I'd go for Mickey Spillane and those pulp novels from the fifties and early sixties. I'd give Nora Roberts a try, but she's always got that icky romance stuff thrown in. If I want romance, I'll go to Goodwill, spend 50 cents on whatever smut they've got lying around, read all the naughty bits and hate myself in the morning. Thank heavens that doesn't happen often. And Oscar Wilde is the epitome of English wit. Good choice. Be well!

Kins
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becke_davis
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Re: Best Dialogue ... and the award goes to?



Kinsasha wrote:
Robert Parker and Elmore Leonard are both great authors. If you want film noir, I'd go for Mickey Spillane and those pulp novels from the fifties and early sixties. I'd give Nora Roberts a try, but she's always got that icky romance stuff thrown in. If I want romance, I'll go to Goodwill, spend 50 cents on whatever smut they've got lying around, read all the naughty bits and hate myself in the morning. Thank heavens that doesn't happen often. And Oscar Wilde is the epitome of English wit. Good choice. Be well!

Kins




I'll start out by saying I'm a big fan of romance (and mystery and paranormal and just about everything else). I totally agree that Robert Parker is a master of dialogue. I would add John Mortimer (Rumpole of the Bailey) and maybe Christopher Moore, too.

I'm not a big fan of Elmore Leonard but, yes, definitely add Nora Roberts. When I read my first Roberts' blockbuster (book 2 of the Three Sisters Island trilogy, which I didn't realize was book 2 when I bought it) it was the snappy, funny dialogue that hooked me. It was that AND the romance that she writes so well that keeps me and millions of other readers coming back for more.

I've read all those books they have in garage sales and at Goodwill, too, and I have one thing to say: we've come a long way, baby. (And with that quote, you can tell exactly how old I am, too.) I liked those old romances as much as anyone else, but if you read any of the contemporary romance authors I think you will see a big difference. Publishers seem confused by this trend, too, since sometimes I find my favorite authors under Literature and sometimes under Romance. A good read is a good read, though, however you classify it.