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Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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March Nook feature- Sacred Treason

Ta da

 

Sacred Treason  

 

is our March Nook Feature

 

remember this is the only thread for the read, it's spoiler friendly just let people know if you're posting spoilers.

 

And let the conversation begin

 

 

Scribe
TarHeelGirl00
Posts: 679
Registered: ‎02-10-2012

Re: March Nook feature- Sacred Treason

I am really enjoying this book!  I hope others are reading it as well.  Hopefully I will find time to finish it this weekend.  I can't wait to find out what happens and I am counting on a good ending.  Has anybody finished yet?

Reader 4
bluebuckeye
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎03-08-2013

Re: March Nook feature- Sacred Treason

**For anyone who hasn't begun or who hasn't progressed very far, this might contain some spoilers.**  I have almost finished this book, and I have enjoyed it.  However, I am having a difficult time finding the character of Rebecca to be believable, given the time period.  Don't get me wrong--I like her.  I just tend to think that a woman during that time period would not be that physically strong of a character (unfortunately).  I also have found a couple of the scenes to be likewise far-fetched, given the time period and wondered if the author arranged them more in an attempt to build attraction between the two main characters (the bathing scene at Summmerhill is the scene that foremost comes to mind here.)  Anyone else have those thoughts?  It just seemed to me that as the book has progressed, the characters have become somewhat less authentic--Rebecca, in particular.

Scribe
TarHeelGirl00
Posts: 679
Registered: ‎02-10-2012

Re: March Nook feature- Sacred Treason

**For anyone who hasn't begun or who hasn't progressed very far, this might contain some spoilers.**
bluebuckeye wrote:

**For anyone who hasn't begun or who hasn't progressed very far, this might contain some spoilers.**  I have almost finished this book, and I have enjoyed it.  However, I am having a difficult time finding the character of Rebecca to be believable, given the time period.  Don't get me wrong--I like her.  I just tend to think that a woman during that time period would not be that physically strong of a character (unfortunately).  I also have found a couple of the scenes to be likewise far-fetched, given the time period and wondered if the author arranged them more in an attempt to build attraction between the two main characters (the bathing scene at Summmerhill is the scene that foremost comes to mind here.)  Anyone else have those thoughts?  It just seemed to me that as the book has progressed, the characters have become somewhat less authentic--Rebecca, in particular.

 


I just finished the book today and the Summerhill bathing scene is one that I had made a note to comment on.  After the tub is brought in and filled with rose petals, herbs, etc, I was surprised that Clarenceux is the one to bathe first.  I like his character, but getting in the water before Rebecca with his wounded body doesn't seem like the gentlemanly thing to do. Then I was not expecting him to stand up out of the tub naked in front of her.  Although she is embarrassed to be caught looking, I guess I would have expected her to turn her head. But I agree as bluebuckeye pointed out, it does help to build the attraction between them.  Their attraction served as a nice break-in-the-action for me.  I kept hoping Clarenceux would not be unfaithful to his wife. But what about Rebecca falling for another man so quickly after her husband's death!?!  For me, it's not that the characters became less authentic, it's a matter of me sometimes wanting to believe that "back in the old days" all the moral dilemnas of today were not an issue, when really they were maybe no less prominent, just not made as widely known.

Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: March Nook feature- Sacred Treason

I'm glad you're both enjoying the read.

bluebuckeye-Isn't that the hardest thing to take when a character is so, well out of character. I mean we know they're fictional but we still have to believe them even in a sci-fi/fantasy

 

thanks for your comments

 

TarHeelGirl-your statement is right on the money even back when I was growing up in the 50s the same social problems were there we just didn't live in a tell all, 24/7 information world then. For our February featured read The House of Velvet and Glass set in the early 1900s near the Titanic disaster and WWI we learned how widespread the problem of Opium addiction was in this country, how there were dens all over the place that were perfectly legal.

 

I still hope to read this novel, I'm thrashing through my required reading as fast as I can :smileyhappy:

Reader 4
bluebuckeye
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎03-08-2013

Re: March Nook feature- Sacred Treason

[ Edited ]

I finished the book last night.  And yes, I totally agree with you both about hoping the moral dilemmas being present "back in the old days," yet never discussed.  I was satisfied with the ending, and to me, it seemed that the characters slipped back into their previous roles.  As if, in their desperate situation, they were able to escape their assigned roles in society, and now that the threat had passed, they almost regretted having to go back to their lives.  Of course, Rebecca doesn't have much to look forward to, at this point.  The thing that sort of irked me about the bathing scene was that the tub was just brought right out into the open.  I guess I would have assumed that the tub would have been put somewhere private, particularly for Rebecca's sake.  At first, I wondered why they would share a tub, but then, given everything involved in drawing the water, heating it, etc., that wasn't so hard for me to believe.  I agree with TarHeelGirl--I found it odd that Clarenceux did not allow Rebecca to bathe first.  And given the time period--or really, any time period, I would not have thought that the men would have remained in the room.  I realize that is a silly thing to get hung up on.  lol  However, I did enjoy the book.

 

I am curious about something else, however.  After finishing the book, did anyone else wonder what the point of all of the Knights of the Round Table even was?  It seemed odd to involve all of these other men in this, when they really didn't seem necessary.  Or, did I miss something?  The story was exciting, but when it got to the end, it just didn't seem that all of the death, torture, and sacrifice was worth what these people went through.  I understand the importance of the information that this was all about--what the implications of it being made public would entail.  I just didn't understand the point of all of these other men being involved in this scheme.

Correspondent
barry2B
Posts: 124
Registered: ‎11-17-2010

Re: March Nook feature- Sacred Treason

I guess here is where I throw my oar in the water. I believe it was common practice at that time that the man used the water first, usually followed by the children then the wife at the end. They all used the same water just adding to it if needed. Also the idea that it would take place somewhere more private is also more modern thinking creeping in.  I kept waiting for the characters to "slip" due to there travelling as man and wife, but I was happy that they did manage to hold firm even though they were both tempted.

Scribe
TarHeelGirl00
Posts: 679
Registered: ‎02-10-2012
0 Kudos

Re: March Nook feature- Sacred Treason


barry2B wrote:

I guess here is where I throw my oar in the water. I believe it was common practice at that time that the man used the water first, usually followed by the children then the wife at the end. They all used the same water just adding to it if needed. Also the idea that it would take place somewhere more private is also more modern thinking creeping in.  I kept waiting for the characters to "slip" due to there travelling as man and wife, but I was happy that they did manage to hold firm even though they were both tempted.


I didn't realize that was common practice, so now it makes a lot more sense.  Thanks for the info!

 

I am also glad that they did not give in to temptation.  It really had me wondering and it did add some suspense to the storyline, but I was happy it turned out the way it did.