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Distinguished Wordsmith
pjpick
Posts: 1,043
Registered: ‎03-16-2007

Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

Lost in Shangri-La  

 

I love it when someone writes history and it reads almost like a novel. After a "history book" like start Zuckoff turned it around and took us on an adventure through the WWII island of New Guinea. Although the event was tragic, the story showed the strength of perserverance, friendship, and loyalty. Zuckoff did an excellent job in researching the story taking accounts from personal interviews and diaries. I also appreciated him presenting the indigenous people's perspective and the cultural lessons we can glean from this tale. I highly recommend for those new to non-fiction--don't let the first 60 pages keep you from learning about these interesting people. I was so invested in these real life people that reading the epilogue of John made my eyes well up with tears. 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

I'm glad you liked it.  It was, to date, my favorite nonfiction book of the year.  If you want you can read my review of it.  I just finished another nf that I didn't love so much.


pjpick wrote:

Lost in Shangri-La  

 

I love it when someone writes history and it reads almost like a novel. After a "history book" like start Zuckoff turned it around and took us on an adventure through the WWII island of New Guinea. Although the event was tragic, the story showed the strength of perserverance, friendship, and loyalty. Zuckoff did an excellent job in researching the story taking accounts from personal interviews and diaries. I also appreciated him presenting the indigenous people's perspective and the cultural lessons we can glean from this tale. I highly recommend for those new to non-fiction--don't let the first 60 pages keep you from learning about these interesting people. I was so invested in these real life people that reading the epilogue of John made my eyes well up with tears. 


 

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Distinguished Wordsmith
pjpick
Posts: 1,043
Registered: ‎03-16-2007
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

[ Edited ]

Ryan_G wrote:

I'm glad you liked it.  It was, to date, my favorite nonfiction book of the year.  If you want you can read my review of it.  I just finished another nf that I didn't love so much.


pjpick wrote:

Lost in Shangri-La  

 

I love it when someone writes history and it reads almost like a novel. After a "history book" like start Zuckoff turned it around and took us on an adventure through the WWII island of New Guinea. Although the event was tragic, the story showed the strength of perserverance, friendship, and loyalty. Zuckoff did an excellent job in researching the story taking accounts from personal interviews and diaries. I also appreciated him presenting the indigenous people's perspective and the cultural lessons we can glean from this tale. I highly recommend for those new to non-fiction--don't let the first 60 pages keep you from learning about these interesting people. I was so invested in these real life people that reading the epilogue of John made my eyes well up with tears. 


 Which one was that? (so I can stay away from it:smileyhappy:)----Awesome review, Ryan!

 


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

State vs. Defense  

 

I agreed with the point the author was trying to get across, but despite my agreeing with him, I really didn't like the tone he chose to use.  It was just a little bit to cotemptous of those he was talking about.  They may have deserved it, but it took some of the impact away knowing how the author felt.

 

 

 

 

 


pjpick wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

I'm glad you liked it.  It was, to date, my favorite nonfiction book of the year.  If you want you can read my review of it.  I just finished another nf that I didn't love so much.


pjpick wrote:

Lost in Shangri-La  

 

I love it when someone writes history and it reads almost like a novel. After a "history book" like start Zuckoff turned it around and took us on an adventure through the WWII island of New Guinea. Although the event was tragic, the story showed the strength of perserverance, friendship, and loyalty. Zuckoff did an excellent job in researching the story taking accounts from personal interviews and diaries. I also appreciated him presenting the indigenous people's perspective and the cultural lessons we can glean from this tale. I highly recommend for those new to non-fiction--don't let the first 60 pages keep you from learning about these interesting people. I was so invested in these real life people that reading the epilogue of John made my eyes well up with tears. 


 Which one was that? (so I can stay away from it:smileyhappy:)----Awesome review, Ryan!

 


 


 

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Distinguished Wordsmith
pjpick
Posts: 1,043
Registered: ‎03-16-2007
0 Kudos

Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

Thanks! I'm not much in the mood for contempt either.

 


Ryan_G wrote:

State vs. Defense  

 

I agreed with the point the author was trying to get across, but despite my agreeing with him, I really didn't like the tone he chose to use.  It was just a little bit to cotemptous of those he was talking about.  They may have deserved it, but it took some of the impact away knowing how the author felt.

 

 

 

 

 


pjpick wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

I'm glad you liked it.  It was, to date, my favorite nonfiction book of the year.  If you want you can read my review of it.  I just finished another nf that I didn't love so much.


pjpick wrote:

Lost in Shangri-La  

 

I love it when someone writes history and it reads almost like a novel. After a "history book" like start Zuckoff turned it around and took us on an adventure through the WWII island of New Guinea. Although the event was tragic, the story showed the strength of perserverance, friendship, and loyalty. Zuckoff did an excellent job in researching the story taking accounts from personal interviews and diaries. I also appreciated him presenting the indigenous people's perspective and the cultural lessons we can glean from this tale. I highly recommend for those new to non-fiction--don't let the first 60 pages keep you from learning about these interesting people. I was so invested in these real life people that reading the epilogue of John made my eyes well up with tears. 


 Which one was that? (so I can stay away from it:smileyhappy:)----Awesome review, Ryan!

 


 


 


 

Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


Ryan_G wrote:

I'm glad you liked it.  It was, to date, my favorite nonfiction book of the year.  If you want you can read my review of it.  I just finished another nf that I didn't love so much.


pjpick wrote:

Lost in Shangri-La  

 

I love it when someone writes history and it reads almost like a novel. After a "history book" like start Zuckoff turned it around and took us on an adventure through the WWII island of New Guinea. Although the event was tragic, the story showed the strength of perserverance, friendship, and loyalty. Zuckoff did an excellent job in researching the story taking accounts from personal interviews and diaries. I also appreciated him presenting the indigenous people's perspective and the cultural lessons we can glean from this tale. I highly recommend for those new to non-fiction--don't let the first 60 pages keep you from learning about these interesting people. I was so invested in these real life people that reading the epilogue of John made my eyes well up with tears. 


 


Wow Ryan GREAT review, thanks for sharing

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dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

[ Edited ]
Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

I just finished a book entitled The Shake.Cover Image

 

The book melds vampire fiction, noir mystery, unsentimental realism and deep existential contemplation into an additively readable story. This book isn't exactly new, but it is a breath of fresh air.

 

The narrative is written in the first person voice of Shake, an accidentally turned century old vampire living in central California. Shake carefully selects his human victims based upon the ease with which a death will be accepted as accidental. His 'donors' of choice are clinically depressed people and the victims of staged auto accidents.

 

Although Shake has lost his humanity, he still thinks like a human. He has questions about his food choices and feels an urge to imbue his existence with some sort of context or meaning. Shake's fascination with the complexity of chance and innate curiosity provide him with some reason to exist. While going through the trunk of a his latest victim/donor, the severely depressed widow of a murdered cop, he uncovers info about the killing as well as the photo of a local real estate tycoon with the word "bloodsucker" written on the back. Shake contemplates the synchronicity of finding this particular man's picture who he knows to be a local drug runner. Shake's curiosity leads him to investigate the cop murder in conjunction with an effort to shake down that particular drug runner. What follows is a serpentine mystery enhanced by intriguing supporting characters, (including a centuries old Japanese female vampire and a barkeep/hooker turned chauffeur).

 

The writing is lean but elegant. The tone is cynical but sincere. I literally inhaled this book. It's both entertaining and thought provoking. I recommend it to all fiction readers who enjoy literary explorations of vampire psychology and/or supernatural noir mysteries. 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

[ Edited ]

Ryan_G wrote:

State vs. Defense  by Stephen Glain

 

I agreed with the point the author was trying to get across, but despite my agreeing with him, I really didn't like the tone he chose to use.  It was just a little bit to cotemptous of those he was talking about.  They may have deserved it, but it took some of the impact away knowing how the author felt.

 

 

 

 

 


pjpick wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

I'm glad you liked it.  It was, to date, my favorite nonfiction book of the year.  If you want you can read my review of it.  I just finished another nf that I didn't love so much.


pjpick wrote:
Which one was that? (so I can stay away from it:smileyhappy:)----Awesome review, Ryan!

 


 I went to find out some more about Stephan Glain and came across this:

 

http://www.stephenglain.com/stephen-glain-on-us-militarism#more-1280

 

http://www.stephenglain.com/about

 

Thanks for the review, Ryan.  I'm glad to know your perspective!  The book plays into some discussions going on around me, so will be watching to see if it comes up.  For now, my own reading plate is full!

 

(I will admit a desire to be able to contrast Glain with Rumsfield's Known and Unknown, which I did listen to a few months ago and ended up feeling it worth my time to have heard his perspectives laid out.)

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

I think my opinoin of Rumsfeld would get in the way of really being open to what he has to say in any book.  Maybe in a few years, but not right now.  I really enjoyed the information given in State Vs. Defense, I just wish the "voice" would have been different.

 


Peppermill wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

State vs. Defense  by Stephen Glain

 

I agreed with the point the author was trying to get across, but despite my agreeing with him, I really didn't like the tone he chose to use.  It was just a little bit to cotemptous of those he was talking about.  They may have deserved it, but it took some of the impact away knowing how the author felt.

 

 

 

 

 


pjpick wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

I'm glad you liked it.  It was, to date, my favorite nonfiction book of the year.  If you want you can read my review of it.  I just finished another nf that I didn't love so much.


pjpick wrote:
Which one was that? (so I can stay away from it:smileyhappy:)----Awesome review, Ryan!

 


 I went to find out some more about Stephan Glain and came across this:

 

http://www.stephenglain.com/stephen-glain-on-us-militarism#more-1280

 

http://www.stephenglain.com/about

 

Thanks for the review, Ryan.  I'm glad to know your perspective!  The book plays into some discussions going on around me, so will be watching to see if it comes up.  For now, my own reading plate is full!

 

(I will admit a desire to be able to contrast Glain with Rumsfield's Known and Unknown, which I did listen to a few months ago and ended up feeling it worth my time to have heard his perspectives laid out.)



 

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Distinguished Wordsmith
pjpick
Posts: 1,043
Registered: ‎03-16-2007

Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

Ryan, My brother would agree with you. He was a career Army man with the Pentagon and did not care for Rumsfeld at all (although he couldn't say so until Rumsfeld was out). He actually met Rumsfeld in a bathroom at the Pentagon once. My brother was standing at the urinal (in full uniform) and he noticed someone came in with an entourage. When he noticed who was standing at the urinal next to him, he just said, "Good morning, sir." and Rumsfeld returned the greeting. After a moment R turned to my brother and said, "I bet you're going to tell everyone you met me in the can." My brother simply replied, "Yep."  Just thought I would share:smileyvery-happy:

Ryan_G wrote:

I think my opinoin of Rumsfeld would get in the way of really being open to what he has to say in any book.  Maybe in a few years, but not right now.  I really enjoyed the information given in State Vs. Defense, I just wish the "voice" would have been different.

 


Peppermill wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

State vs. Defense  by Stephen Glain

 

I agreed with the point the author was trying to get across, but despite my agreeing with him, I really didn't like the tone he chose to use.  It was just a little bit to cotemptous of those he was talking about.  They may have deserved it, but it took some of the impact away knowing how the author felt.

 

 

 

 

 


pjpick wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

I'm glad you liked it.  It was, to date, my favorite nonfiction book of the year.  If you want you can read my review of it.  I just finished another nf that I didn't love so much.


pjpick wrote:
Which one was that? (so I can stay away from it:smileyhappy:)----Awesome review, Ryan!

 


 I went to find out some more about Stephan Glain and came across this:

 

http://www.stephenglain.com/stephen-glain-on-us-militarism#more-1280

 

http://www.stephenglain.com/about

 

Thanks for the review, Ryan.  I'm glad to know your perspective!  The book plays into some discussions going on around me, so will be watching to see if it comes up.  For now, my own reading plate is full!

 

(I will admit a desire to be able to contrast Glain with Rumsfield's Known and Unknown, which I did listen to a few months ago and ended up feeling it worth my time to have heard his perspectives laid out.)



 


 

Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


dalnewt wrote:

I just finished a book entitled The Shake.Cover Image

 

The book melds vampire fiction, noir mystery, unsentimental realism and deep existential contemplation into an additively readable story. This book isn't exactly new, but it is a breath of fresh air.

 

The narrative is written in the first person voice of Shake, an accidentally turned century old vampire living in central California. Shake carefully selects his human victims based upon the ease with which a death will be accepted as accidental. His 'donors' of choice are clinically depressed people and the victims of staged auto accidents.

 

Although Shake has lost his humanity, he still thinks like a human. He has questions about his food choices and feels an urge to imbue his existence with some sort of context or meaning. Shake's fascination with the complexity of chance and innate curiosity provide him with some reason to exist. While going through the trunk of a his latest victim/donor, the severely depressed widow of a murdered cop, he uncovers info about the killing as well as the photo of a local real estate tycoon with the word "bloodsucker" written on the back. Shake contemplates the synchronicity of finding this particular man's picture who he knows to be a local drug runner. Shake's curiosity leads him to investigate the cop murder in conjunction with an effort to shake down that particular drug runner. What follows is a serpentine mystery enhanced by intriguing supporting characters, (including a centuries old Japanese female vampire and a barkeep/hooker turned chauffeur).

 

The writing is lean but elegant. The tone is cynical but sincere. I literally inhaled this book. It's both entertaining and thought provoking. I recommend it to all fiction readers who enjoy literary explorations of vampire psychology and/or supernatural noir mysteries. 


dainewt, what a wonderful review. I can't see anyone not a fan of this genre who wouldn't rush to a store and pick this up from how you described it.

Distinguished Correspondent
1AnneB
Posts: 848
Registered: ‎08-03-2009
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


dhaupt wrote:

dalnewt wrote:

I just finished a book entitled The Shake.Cover Image

 

The book melds vampire fiction, noir mystery, unsentimental realism and deep existential contemplation into an additively readable story. This book isn't exactly new, but it is a breath of fresh air.

 

The narrative is written in the first person voice of Shake, an accidentally turned century old vampire living in central California. Shake carefully selects his human victims based upon the ease with which a death will be accepted as accidental. His 'donors' of choice are clinically depressed people and the victims of staged auto accidents.

 

Although Shake has lost his humanity, he still thinks like a human. He has questions about his food choices and feels an urge to imbue his existence with some sort of context or meaning. Shake's fascination with the complexity of chance and innate curiosity provide him with some reason to exist. While going through the trunk of a his latest victim/donor, the severely depressed widow of a murdered cop, he uncovers info about the killing as well as the photo of a local real estate tycoon with the word "bloodsucker" written on the back. Shake contemplates the synchronicity of finding this particular man's picture who he knows to be a local drug runner. Shake's curiosity leads him to investigate the cop murder in conjunction with an effort to shake down that particular drug runner. What follows is a serpentine mystery enhanced by intriguing supporting characters, (including a centuries old Japanese female vampire and a barkeep/hooker turned chauffeur).

 

The writing is lean but elegant. The tone is cynical but sincere. I literally inhaled this book. It's both entertaining and thought provoking. I recommend it to all fiction readers who enjoy literary explorations of vampire psychology and/or supernatural noir mysteries. 


dainewt, what a wonderful review. I can't see anyone not a fan of this genre who wouldn't rush to a store and pick this up from how you described it.


Boy !! Did that review pique my interest ! I'm really looking forward to reading it - I just downloaded is and it was on sale !!! If that's not a sign, I don't know what is. Thanks for the review dalnewt.

 

Anne

Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


dhaupt wrote:

literature wrote:

dhaupt wrote:

I wanted to give you all a heads up for our February 2012 read.

 

Paris Noire  

 

Here's my review

 

http://thereadingfrenzy.blogspot.com/2011/09/review-of-paris-noire-by-francine.html?spref=gr#close=1


 

 

 

 

 

Hi Deb,

Now you sparked my interest.  I'm going to purchase the book and get back into the book club discussions.  Definitely see you in Feb.  Am still missing FL too much!

Literature


Literature, I'm so happy you're coming back, I've missed you. :smileyhappy:


The book is now in my house, tempted to start reading, but will wait until January.  I've been glancing through it and trying very hard not to read, but time will tell.

 

Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


literature wrote:

dhaupt wrote:

literature wrote:

dhaupt wrote:

I wanted to give you all a heads up for our February 2012 read.

 

Paris Noire  

 

Here's my review

 

http://thereadingfrenzy.blogspot.com/2011/09/review-of-paris-noire-by-francine.html?spref=gr#close=1


 

 

 

 

 

Hi Deb,

Now you sparked my interest.  I'm going to purchase the book and get back into the book club discussions.  Definitely see you in Feb.  Am still missing FL too much!

Literature


Literature, I'm so happy you're coming back, I've missed you. :smileyhappy:


The book is now in my house, tempted to start reading, but will wait until January.  I've been glancing through it and trying very hard not to read, but time will tell.

 


I'll see you then literature, oh and here's what my Hometown Boy said about temptation

 


 

" I deal with temptation by yielding to it"

 

Mark Twain

Reader 2
Curledupreading
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎09-03-2011

Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter

Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter  

Hi book loving friends! I just finished another book that was very interesting. It is called Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. This book is a fiction, fantasy, horror book all rolled into one. How the book starts out is a shop owner meets a strange man that gives him a bunch of Abraham Lincoln’s vampire hunting journals. The shop owner was told to read them and write a book about it. As the book progresses it mixes true things that happened in Lincoln’s life with how he was a vampire hunter for thirty years. This includes the time that he was in office for Illinois and also as he was President. It also talks about the “true reason” for the Civil War between the “states” at this time in his life. Also the book talks about how he worked with the “Union” to win the war. The book also adds in how he loses loved ones, including his mother, first love, two sons, a dear friend, and finally his assassination. Through out the book there are illustrations of various times in Lincoln’s life and of vampires that are amazingly done. Finally I know you should not judge a book by it’s cover, but that is exactly how I came across this book! Who wouldn't’t stop and pick up a book that has Lincoln on it with blood on his coat and then on the back cover it is the back of him with his ax holding a vampire head! Seth Brahame-Smith did a great job at peaking my interest and keeping it through out the book.

Distinguished Bibliophile
shadowcat80
Posts: 2,356
Registered: ‎12-25-2010
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Batman/Superman enemies and allies review

Enemies and Allies  I reviewed this book a long time ago but not on this thread I didn't see the thread how I missed it on top of the page is a mystery to me maybe I need to world's greatest detective to solve that.

 

 

Before I go on this is a novel not a graphic book an actually novel.  This book is set in the time of President Eisenhower and Batman and Superman are both new on the scene in their respected places.  In the case of Batman he's feared by most and the police hunt him down instead of considering him a hero while in Metropolis the man of steel is cheered as the shining knight that saves the damsel in distress.

 

But lurking in the shadows is Lex Luthor who has ambitions to taking over the world and he starts by getting moles in Wayne Enterprise to get technology from Wayne's company.  Well Bruce being the brillant detective he is notices and he becomes his darker self to investigate.

 

Eventually the two heroes meet but because of the dark imagery of Batman, Superman mistakes him for a criminal at first but at some point he is in trouble due to his first encounter of his weakness Kryptonite.  Batman saves him and the two become allies and stop Lex Luthor.

 

I loved this book and if you like DC comics you would too.  I hope my review is helpful.

Help me down the crooked road. Lead me to the light. I'm not sure I know the way but with you beside me, I'm certain we'll make it through.
Inspired Wordsmith
kimba88
Posts: 790
Registered: ‎01-05-2011
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Re: Batman/Superman enemies and allies review

Inspired Contributor
j-91
Posts: 37
Registered: ‎09-29-2010
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Re: Batman/Superman enemies and allies review

Hi Everyone,
Just a reminder of all the author interviews and giveaways that I am having on my book review blog Blood Rose Books. Make sure to stop by to enter. The following authors have been featured:

Amanda Downum (Author Interview & Giveaway)
Dakota Banks (Author Interview & Giveaway)
Dianne Sylvan (Author Interview & Giveaway)
Donna Boyd (Ball) (Author Interview)
Gemma Halliday (Author Interview and Giveaway)
J. J. Westendarp (Author Interview & Giveaway)
Julie Kenner (Author Interview & Giveaway)
Kari Stewart (Author Interview)
L. J. Sellers (Author Interview & Giveaway)
Layton Green (Author Interview)
Reena Jacobs (Author Interview & Giveaway)
Richard Doetsch (Author Interview & Giveaway)
Richard Kadrey (Author Interview & Giveaway)
S. L. Pierce (Author Interview and Giveaway)
Sophie Littlefield (Author Interview & Giveaway)
Toni Lotempio (Author Interview & Giveaway)
Trevor Shane (Author Interview & Giveaway)
Xavier Lerent (Author Interview)

So make sure you stop by to check out some interviews and enter some giveaways (Blood Rose Books). All contests close October 7, 2011 at midnight central time.

Cheers!!!!

Proud to be a Bookworm :smileyhappy:


http://j9books.blogspot.com/