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dhaupt
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


Peppermill wrote:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/william-ambler/halloween-books-_b_1066471.html#s442636&title=The_Face_...

 

This link has a slide show naming a group of horror books.  Not my cup of tea to read, but interesting just to see the titles, authors, and brief reviews.

 

 


Thanks Pepper, I'm not a big fan of horror but I do like some

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literature
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


dhaupt wrote:

dalnewt wrote:

The Night Circus

Details

 

is scheduled for release September 13. It looks fantastic and has been chosen as September Feature #1 on the Fantasy and Sci-Fi genre board at SEPTEMBER FEATURE #1: The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern.

 

I became intrigued by the book recently and am definitely going to order it. See reviews and recommendations below:

 

Publishers Weekly 
Debut author Morgenstern doesn't miss a beat in this smashing tale of greed, fate, and love set in a turn of the 20th-century circus. Celia is a five-year-old with untrained psychokinetic powers when she is unceremoniously dumped on her unsuspecting father, Hector Bowen, better known as Le Cirque des Reves' Prospero the Entertainer. Hector immediately hatches a sinister scheme for Celia: pit her against a rival's young magician in an epic battle of magic that will, by design, result in the death of one of the players, though neither Celia nor her adversary, Marco, is informed of the inevitable outcome. What neither Hector nor his rival count on is that Celia and Marco will eventually fall in love. Their mentors—Marco's mentor, Alexander, plucked him from the London streets due to his psychic abilities—attempt to intervene with little success as Celia and Marco barrel toward an unexpected and oddly fitting conclusion. Supporting characters—such as Bailey, a farm boy who befriends a set of twins born into the circus who will drastically influence his future; Isobel, a circus employee and onetime girlfriend of Marco's; and theatrical producer Chandresh Christophe Lefèvre—are perfectly realized and live easily in a giant, magical story destined for bestsellerdom. This is an electric debut on par with Special Topics in Calamity Physics. (Sept.)

 

From Barnes & Nobel

"Opens at Nightfall; Closes at Dawn." The Le Cirque des Rêves is a circus unlike any other, just as this magical debut novel is equally unique. At the center of The Night Circus spectacle are two specially gifted young magicians, Celia and Marco, pitted against each other in professional competition, drawn towards one another in love. Erin Morgenstern's literary fantasy has already drawn raves for its captivating evocativeness: "A world of almost unbearable beauty.... A love story on a grand scale: it creates, it destroys, it ultimately transcends." "A novel so magical that there is no escaping its spell... If you choose to read just one novel this year, this is it.

 


 Praise For NIGHT CIRCUS

"The Night Circus made me happy. Playful and intensely imaginative, Erin Morgenstern has created the circus I have always longed for and she has populated it with dueling love-struck magicians, precocious kittens, hyper-elegant displays of beauty and complicated clocks. This is a marvelous book."

-- Audrey Niffenegger, author of The Time Traveler’s Wife 

"Self-assured, entertaining debut that blends genres and crosses continents in quest of magic… Generous in its vision and fun to read. Likely to be a big book—and, soon, a big movie, with all the franchise trimmings."
Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“To enter the black-and-white-striped tents of Le Cirque des Rêves is to enter a world where objects really do turn into birds and people really do disappear…Debut novelist Morgenstern has written a 19th-century flight of fancy that is, nevertheless, completely believable. The smells, textures, sounds, and sights are almost palpable. A literary Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride, this read is completely magical.
—Library Journal, starred review

"This big and compelling first novel ushers in a menacing tone with its first sentence: "The circus arrives without warning."...With appeal for readers not particularly geared to fantasy but who plainly enjoy an unusual and well-drawn story, this one will make a good crossover suggestion."
--Booklist, starred review

“‘Dark as soot and bright as sparks,’ The Night Circus still holds me willingly captive in a world of almost unbearable beauty. This is a love story on a grand scale: it creates, it destroys, it ultimately transcends. Take a bow, Erin Morgenstern. This is one of the best books I have ever read.” 
Brunonia Barry, author of The Lace Reader
 
“A riveting debut. The Night Circus pulls you into a world as dark as it is dazzling, fully-realized but still something out of a dream. You will not want to leave it.”
Téa Obreht, author of The Tiger’s Wife
 
"Every once in awhile you find a novel so magical that there is no escaping its spell. The Night Circus is one of these rarities -- engrossing, beautifully written and utterly enchanting. If you choose to read just one novel this year, this is it."
Danielle Trussoni, author of Angelology
 
"Pure pleasure...Erin Morgenstern is a gifted, classic storyteller, a tale-teller, a spinner of the charmed and mesmerizing -- I had many other things I was supposed to be doing, but the book kept drawing me back in and I tore through it. You can be certain this riveting debut will create a group of rêveurs all its own."
—Aimee Bender, author of The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake
 
“The Night Circus is a gorgeously imagined fable poised in the high latitudes of Hans Christian Anderson and Oscar Wilde, with a few degrees toward Hesse’s “Steppenwolf” for dangerous spice. The tale is masterfully written and invites allegorical interpretations even as its leisurely but persistent suspense gives it compelling charm. An enchanting read.” 

Katherine Dunn, author of Geek Love


Thanks dainewt, this looks really good. :smileyhappy:


I am reading The Night Circus and am thoroughly enjoying it.  I look forward to reading it just as I would if I were to be attending the circus itself.  Very imaginative, to say the least.

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kimba88
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

Shadow in Serenity  

 

Shadow in Serenity by Terri Blackstock is a faith based novel set in Serenity, Texas.  This was a heart-warming novel about faith, love, second chances and the spirit of one small town.  I enjoyed the characters Blackstock created and the wonderful tale she tells. 
Carney Sullivan is tough as nails, a good mother and loves the people of Serenity as if they were family. Raised by con artist in a traveling carnival she knows a con when she sees one.  When Logan Brisco show up promising to make the dreams of this financially depressed little town come true she smells a con.  Despite her best efforts the people she loves can’t seem to get enough of Logan and his sweet words. 
Logan Brisco has one thing in mind when he enters the town of Serenity and that’s money. That is until he gets one look at spunky Carney.  The more trouble she gives him, the more he wants to win her over. Logan knows he should pack his bag and leave, he’s breaking all the rules in the business…but he just can’t resist Carney.
What unfolds is a delightful tale of faith, love and redemption. Blackstock creates a town and characters you will instantly love.  Suspense builds as you wait to see if Logan can be the kind of man Carney needs.
 Shadow of Serenity is beautifully written and its message clear. There were several suspenseful and touching moments in the book. The tale unraveled easily and I finished in less than two days.  I just have to tell you dear reader that I loved Jack and I am sure you will too.I recommend this to anyone who enjoys a good romance with a faith based message.  I look forward to exploring more of Terri Blackstock’s novels.
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Ryan_G
Posts: 3,287
Registered: ‎10-24-2008

Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

Here is my review for Camp Nine by Viviene Schiffer

 

Camp Nine  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For some strange reason, I've been reading a lot of books this year that relates a story during World War II.  I've never been a big fan of war history or that particular time period, so I have found it all that more curious that I seem to be reading everything that comes my way that deals with that era of history.  They have for the most part been nonfiction and the few fiction books have been mysteries or Gothic that just happens to be set during that period.  Up until this point, I hadn't read a fiction books that needs to be set in that period in order for the story to work.  Camp Nine is the first one and if they are all like this one, I have a very busy life ahead of me.  For me this book wasn't about the history, though it played a huge part, it was more about the story itself.

Now while this book does deal with race, class, and the societal structures of the day, that's not what I focused on as I was reading it.  Those elements needed to be there in order for the story to progress, but I couldn't take my mind off the characters long enough to really analyze the rest of it.  This experience was all about some of the most wonderful characters I have had the pleasure of discovering in a long time. 

The action revolves around Chess and her mother from the beginning and it never leaves them as the other characters are introduced.  The way they interact with one particular family in the internment camp, the Matsui family, made me feel hope and relief that there may still be people who are willing to fight for what's right and just, even if it's only in the smallest way.  They, despite their faults and blindness to other issues, do what they can to make the lives of those in the camps a little better and develop close friendships with some of them.  I can't even start to explain the richness of all the other characters as they bought in their voices and stories to the tale.  These will a cast of extraordinary people that I don't think I will forget for a very long time.

But the one character that set this book apart from a lot of others, was the place.  The land became the most important character as it dictated so many of the relationships between the human characters.  The land controlled the fates of those who owned and those who worked.  It gave some riches and caused others to be little more than serfs of those who owned the land.  It was the canvas that gave life to all those who lived on it and it wouldn't hesitate to take it all back.  It was a living, breathing entity that provided a lush and rich background for the dynamic relationships that I found so much pleasure in.

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
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dhaupt
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


kimba88 wrote:

Shadow in Serenity  

 

Shadow in Serenity by Terri Blackstock is a faith based novel set in Serenity, Texas.  This was a heart-warming novel about faith, love, second chances and the spirit of one small town.  I enjoyed the characters Blackstock created and the wonderful tale she tells. 
Carney Sullivan is tough as nails, a good mother and loves the people of Serenity as if they were family. Raised by con artist in a traveling carnival she knows a con when she sees one.  When Logan Brisco show up promising to make the dreams of this financially depressed little town come true she smells a con.  Despite her best efforts the people she loves can’t seem to get enough of Logan and his sweet words. 
Logan Brisco has one thing in mind when he enters the town of Serenity and that’s money. That is until he gets one look at spunky Carney.  The more trouble she gives him, the more he wants to win her over. Logan knows he should pack his bag and leave, he’s breaking all the rules in the business…but he just can’t resist Carney.
What unfolds is a delightful tale of faith, love and redemption. Blackstock creates a town and characters you will instantly love.  Suspense builds as you wait to see if Logan can be the kind of man Carney needs.
 Shadow of Serenity is beautifully written and its message clear. There were several suspenseful and touching moments in the book. The tale unraveled easily and I finished in less than two days.  I just have to tell you dear reader that I loved Jack and I am sure you will too.I recommend this to anyone who enjoys a good romance with a faith based message.  I look forward to exploring more of Terri Blackstock’s novels.

Thanks Kimba

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dhaupt
Posts: 11,829
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


Ryan_G wrote:

Here is my review for Camp Nine by Viviene Schiffer

 

Camp Nine  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For some strange reason, I've been reading a lot of books this year that relates a story during World War II.  I've never been a big fan of war history or that particular time period, so I have found it all that more curious that I seem to be reading everything that comes my way that deals with that era of history.  They have for the most part been nonfiction and the few fiction books have been mysteries or Gothic that just happens to be set during that period.  Up until this point, I hadn't read a fiction books that needs to be set in that period in order for the story to work.  Camp Nine is the first one and if they are all like this one, I have a very busy life ahead of me.  For me this book wasn't about the history, though it played a huge part, it was more about the story itself.

Now while this book does deal with race, class, and the societal structures of the day, that's not what I focused on as I was reading it.  Those elements needed to be there in order for the story to progress, but I couldn't take my mind off the characters long enough to really analyze the rest of it.  This experience was all about some of the most wonderful characters I have had the pleasure of discovering in a long time. 

The action revolves around Chess and her mother from the beginning and it never leaves them as the other characters are introduced.  The way they interact with one particular family in the internment camp, the Matsui family, made me feel hope and relief that there may still be people who are willing to fight for what's right and just, even if it's only in the smallest way.  They, despite their faults and blindness to other issues, do what they can to make the lives of those in the camps a little better and develop close friendships with some of them.  I can't even start to explain the richness of all the other characters as they bought in their voices and stories to the tale.  These will a cast of extraordinary people that I don't think I will forget for a very long time.

But the one character that set this book apart from a lot of others, was the place.  The land became the most important character as it dictated so many of the relationships between the human characters.  The land controlled the fates of those who owned and those who worked.  It gave some riches and caused others to be little more than serfs of those who owned the land.  It was the canvas that gave life to all those who lived on it and it wouldn't hesitate to take it all back.  It was a living, breathing entity that provided a lush and rich background for the dynamic relationships that I found so much pleasure in.


Ryan I know what you mean about WW11 literature, I've even read some Vampire Hard Fantasy set during the war. Did you read The Postmistress with FL? If not that was also an exceptional just prior to the onset of WW11 in the US. Also in February we're featuring a WW11 era novel 

Paris Noire  

 

maybe you might want to join us.

 

Thanks Ryan

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Ryan_G
Posts: 3,287
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

[ Edited ]

I think I will join you guys for that one.  It sounds pretty good.  I am getting ready to read another non ficiton book about the same period.

 

A Train in Winter  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


dhaupt wrote:

Ryan I know what you mean about WW11 literature, I've even read some Vampire Hard Fantasy set during the war. Did you read The Postmistress with FL? If not that was also an exceptional just prior to the onset of WW11 in the US. Also in February we're featuring a WW11 era novel 

Paris Noire  

 

maybe you might want to join us.

 

Thanks Ryan




"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
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dhaupt
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


Ryan_G wrote:

I think I will join you guys for that one.  It sounds pretty good.  I am getting ready to read another non ficiton book about the same period.

 

A Train in Winter  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


dhaupt wrote:

Ryan I know what you mean about WW11 literature, I've even read some Vampire Hard Fantasy set during the war. Did you read The Postmistress with FL? If not that was also an exceptional just prior to the onset of WW11 in the US. Also in February we're featuring a WW11 era novel 

Paris Noire  

 

maybe you might want to join us.

 

Thanks Ryan





Ryan, I look forward to your participation.

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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

[ Edited ]

Ryan_G wrote:

I think I will join you guys for that one. [Paris Noire]  It sounds pretty good.  I am getting ready to read another non fiction book about the same period.

 

A Train in Winter  by Caroline Moorehead


 

 

 How appropriate for November, the  month of Remembrance!  Sounds like a powerful book from the B&N description.   Look forward to your comments, Ryan.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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kimba88
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

The Secret of Lies  

 

 

 

The Secret of Lies by Barbara Forte Abate has to be one of the best novels I have ever had the pleasure to read.  I was shocked to learn this is Abate’s first published work.  Her writing style brings to mind such authors as Harper Lee and John Steinbeck.  She writes with such detail, bringing images to life with the stroke of her pen. In her debut novel, she delivers a touching tale about, love, innocence, betrayal, loss and lies.
 Secret of Lies reflects back on events that occurred off the Atlantic coast during the summer of 1957. The story unfolds through the voice of protagonist Stevie Burke. When the tale begins, Stevie is sneaking out of her home and leaving her husband. She is driving aimlessly and ends up in a dark musty hotel room three days later. We can tell that she is deeply troubled by something. It is here, as an Elvis song plays on the radio,  that she reflects back on the summers, she and her sister spent at the shore home of their Aunt Smyrna and Uncle Cal.
Abate writes with a paint brush, bringing the seaside, storms, and fields to life. I could feel the wind and smell the sea air.  She has a gift for beautifully expressing the emotions and feelings of a first kiss, a betrayal and loss.  She unfolds the tale allowing the reader to put the pieces together before Stevie, giving us a sense of foreboding. While the subject matter is dark, Abate also shows us the light. We experience the joy of first love, childhood, and innocence.
Abates creates characters that you will love, pity and loathe.  The character of Stevie is beautifully portrayed and you cannot help but like her. The way in which Abate shows the interaction between Stevie and her sister Eleanor reminded me of my own childhood.  After the tragedy of 1957, we see firsthand how this affects Stevie. She struggles with the secrets and her memories. Years later,she meets Ash Waterman; through him she may finally find peace and happiness.  I found myself rooting for this young man as he struggles to understand Stevie.  The romance that develops between them is sweet, witty and romantic.
The story, the circumstances, and the impact it has on the characters is believable and touching. The events that occurred in the summer of '57 could have happened to any family. The ending is not wrapped up in a pretty little bow, but instead allows the reader to determine the outcome. While some may not like it, I feel it was appropriate. After all, life and family drama, do not come in neat little boxes.
I highly recommend this novel to everyone, but particularly those who enjoy books based on family, tragedy and human emotion. This would make a wonderful book club read.  I have added Barbara Forte Abate to my list of must read authors and look forward to her next book. 

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nhbookfan
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

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dhaupt
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


nhbookfan wrote:

Witches of East End (Beauchamp Family Book Series #1)  

 


Hi nhbookfan, welcome to General Fiction, tell us how you liked the novel when you're through. I hope to see you visit again soon :smileyhappy:

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Peppermill
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

This was brought to my attention by a long-ago (over a couple of years ago) participant in B&N discussions with whom I stay in touch.  I haven't read it myself and don't know that I shall get to it, but it sounds powerful and we have been discussing the recent availability of WWII related fiction, so I bring it to our attention here:

 

Life and Fate  by Vasily Grossman, Robert Chandler (Introduction)

 

Here is the review that appeared in The Guardian:

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/aug/31/life-fate-vasily-grossman

 

"This autumn, the BBC's drama serial based on Vasily Grossman's epic novel of Stalingrad, Life and Fate (1959), comes to Radio 4. It will have a starry cast, including Kenneth Branagh as the nuclear physicist Viktor Shtrum – the nearest thing in the vast human ensemble of the book to an alter ego for Grossman himself . With any luck, a public much larger than the one that encountered the novel in Robert Chandler's excellent English translation will soon recognise Life and Fate as all the things critics say it is: one of the great narratives of battle, a moral monument, a witness-report in fiction from the heart of 20th-century darkness, an astonishing act of truth-telling."

 

(The link to the article on Grossman tells a bit about the man and his work.)

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Inspired Wordsmith
kimba88
Posts: 790
Registered: ‎01-05-2011

Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

The Language of Flowers  

 

The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh is a stunning debut novel that will forever change the way you look at flowers.  Diffenbaugh weaves a tale about love, faith, endurance and one woman’s battle to overcome her troubled past.
The story takes place in San Francisco and centers on protagonist Victoria Jones.  Victoria has grown up in the foster care system and has now become emancipated. Diffenbaugh slowly peels back the petals in Victoria’s present and past life, giving us a glimpse of the dynamics that make up this complicated young woman. Told in Victoria’s voice, we see her struggle to communicate with the world around her.  It is through flowers that she is able to express herself. Yellow roses mean jealousy, winter cherry signifies deception, and starwort gives welcome.
As a young adult, Victoria finds employment at a flower shop, and using the language of flowers begins to communicate with others.  News of her gift, spread and soon people are coming to her for flowers.  She meets a young man, who patiently tries to communicate to her through flowers. Their romance is bittersweet and will not leave the reader untouched.
As we journey through Victoria’s past, we learn how she came to communicate with flowers.  When she was ten years old, she was taken into the home of Elizabeth.  Victoria suffering from a life spent in a myriad of foster homes and facilities is detached, doesn’t like to be touched and trusts no one. She fully expects Elizabeth to reject her.  Elizabeth opens up her home and slowly shows her the meaning of love. She teaches Victoria the language of flowers.  It is through flowers that Victoria begins to communicate and forms her first bond with another human.
As the tale weaves back and forth between the past and present, answers are slowly revealed as to why Victoria is on her own and no longer with Elizabeth. The story will captivate you, as you are swept up in this heart-breaking, truthful tale.  Diffenbaugh brings voice to human tragedy, our failed foster-care system and the hearts ability to endure and overcome.
I highly recommend The Language of Flowers to everyone.  The novel is beautifully written and the transition from past to present is seamless.  I am adding Vanessa Diffenbaugh to my list of must read authors. This novel would be perfect for a book club and an excellent gift for the reader on your list. 
I want to thank netGalley and Random House Publishing Group for providing this ARC, in exchange for my unbiased review.
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dhaupt
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


kimba88 wrote:

The Language of Flowers  

 

The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh is a stunning debut novel that will forever change the way you look at flowers.  Diffenbaugh weaves a tale about love, faith, endurance and one woman’s battle to overcome her troubled past.
The story takes place in San Francisco and centers on protagonist Victoria Jones.  Victoria has grown up in the foster care system and has now become emancipated. Diffenbaugh slowly peels back the petals in Victoria’s present and past life, giving us a glimpse of the dynamics that make up this complicated young woman. Told in Victoria’s voice, we see her struggle to communicate with the world around her.  It is through flowers that she is able to express herself. Yellow roses mean jealousy, winter cherry signifies deception, and starwort gives welcome.
As a young adult, Victoria finds employment at a flower shop, and using the language of flowers begins to communicate with others.  News of her gift, spread and soon people are coming to her for flowers.  She meets a young man, who patiently tries to communicate to her through flowers. Their romance is bittersweet and will not leave the reader untouched.
As we journey through Victoria’s past, we learn how she came to communicate with flowers.  When she was ten years old, she was taken into the home of Elizabeth.  Victoria suffering from a life spent in a myriad of foster homes and facilities is detached, doesn’t like to be touched and trusts no one. She fully expects Elizabeth to reject her.  Elizabeth opens up her home and slowly shows her the meaning of love. She teaches Victoria the language of flowers.  It is through flowers that Victoria begins to communicate and forms her first bond with another human.
As the tale weaves back and forth between the past and present, answers are slowly revealed as to why Victoria is on her own and no longer with Elizabeth. The story will captivate you, as you are swept up in this heart-breaking, truthful tale.  Diffenbaugh brings voice to human tragedy, our failed foster-care system and the hearts ability to endure and overcome.
I highly recommend The Language of Flowers to everyone.  The novel is beautifully written and the transition from past to present is seamless.  I am adding Vanessa Diffenbaugh to my list of must read authors. This novel would be perfect for a book club and an excellent gift for the reader on your list. 
I want to thank netGalley and Random House Publishing Group for providing this ARC, in exchange for my unbiased review.

thanks kimba

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trainreader4me
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

If you're into edgy YA on the cheap. $.99 gets you suburban teens sexting, hooking up, FWB, sexual abuse, high school jerks.  Interesting read. A little too intense by the third book.

 

 

The chick friends rules! Freshman year 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The chick friends rules! Sophomore year  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The chick friends rules! Junior year  

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dhaupt
Posts: 11,829
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


trainreader4me wrote:

If you're into edgy YA on the cheap. $.99 gets you suburban teens sexting, hooking up, FWB, sexual abuse, high school jerks.  Interesting read. A little too intense by the third book.

 

 

The chick friends rules! Freshman year 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The chick friends rules! Sophomore year  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The chick friends rules! Junior year  


Thanks for the heads up train. I hope to see you here often to let us know what you're reading.

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HoosierJoe
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Registered: ‎08-31-2011
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

Desperate Times - Nicholas Antinozzi

 

This is a freebie from smashwords.  And good thing it is free.  Had I paid for it I would be mightily disappointed. 

 

The good is that it moves along at a good pace, has an interesting premise, and is clean with little cursing and no sex.

 

The bad is that it is long, has a lot of waste, has spelling errors, and is in sore need of stringent editing.

 

There is so much waste in this book, that I found myself skimming the last 250 or so pages (it was over 800 pgs on my nook).  There are entire chapters devoted to things that have nothing to do with what eventually happens and has little bearing on anything to do with the story.

 

Some of the dialog is simply inane and filled with very old cliches. 

 

The writer using forshadowing or events with phrases like "Little did they know they were wrong". 

 

He uses inexplicable phrases like "his time on this earth was over".  Who writes that way?

 

Hopefully this writer will find an editor with a hard hand.  He has good ideas and a good sense of adventure and pace.  He needs discipline.

 

Anyhow, it's a freebie.

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dhaupt
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed


HoosierJoe wrote:

Desperate Times - Nicholas Antinozzi

 

This is a freebie from smashwords.  And good thing it is free.  Had I paid for it I would be mightily disappointed. 

 

The good is that it moves along at a good pace, has an interesting premise, and is clean with little cursing and no sex.

 

The bad is that it is long, has a lot of waste, has spelling errors, and is in sore need of stringent editing.

 

There is so much waste in this book, that I found myself skimming the last 250 or so pages (it was over 800 pgs on my nook).  There are entire chapters devoted to things that have nothing to do with what eventually happens and has little bearing on anything to do with the story.

 

Some of the dialog is simply inane and filled with very old cliches. 

 

The writer using forshadowing or events with phrases like "Little did they know they were wrong". 

 

He uses inexplicable phrases like "his time on this earth was over".  Who writes that way?

 

Hopefully this writer will find an editor with a hard hand.  He has good ideas and a good sense of adventure and pace.  He needs discipline.

 

Anyhow, it's a freebie.


Hi Joe and thank you for your comments.

You might want to forward these comments to the author if he has a website etc.., I find that authors really like to hear comments from their readers.

 

I hope to see you back soon on the boards 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009
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Re: New Recommended and or Reviewed

[ Edited ]

I just finished 

Never Knew Another. I love the immediacy and flow of the prose in this book. It was an entrancing read for me. Plus, there's a metaphorical punch to this book that goes far beyond fantasy. (See Paul Goat Allen's blog review The Ripple Effect: J.M. McDermott’s Newest Fantasy Packs One Helluva Thematic Wallop.)

 

IMO, all fiction readers will enjoy this book. For me, the story revealed, in an extremely palpable way, the experience of living as a sentient being in a hostile and unforgiving world. 

 

The book doesn't define the world it creates. Instead, it vividly paints that semi-medieval world through the characters. The book is narrated by a wolfskin wearing Walker who can shape-shift into a wolf. Accompanied by her 'Walker' husband, she hunts for half-demons.

 

The book starts with that unnamed Walker and her mated husband coming across the corpse of a half-demon dressed in the uniform of the King's Guard. Demon-children are toxic. Their blood, saliva, tears and sweat cause the immediate death of plants, and their taint may result in animal and human death. The corpse pollutes the ground upon which it rests. It is the duty of the Walkers to hunt demon-children and deliver them to the local authorities for burning at the stake. Plus, they are charged with the responsibility of purifying, often by burning, any place that has absorbed the demon taint.

 

Walkers also have the ability to incorporate the memories of the dead, and the narrator does so in order to determine if this dead demon-child knew any others like himself. It's a bit macabre but fascinating as she prepares the skull of the dead man, named Corporal Jona, for transport. As the book proceeds, she accesses Jona's life memories which causes the narrative to change to a third person account of his life in a city identified by the Walkers as Dogsland. Jona's life memories are visceral and moving. Initially his isolation, frustration and brutish violence come through, but gradually a flicker of hope and, perhaps, love emerges.

 

As the Walker follows the trail of Jona's memories in Dogsland, she becomes aware of two other demon-children, a woman named Rachel Nolander who has lived in squalid circumstances with her fully human brother and a short-memoried thief named Salvatore. When she catches the scent of Rachel and Salvatore, she is able to glimpse their memories as well. The narrative transitions from the short first person accounts of the Walker's hunt through Dogsland and the third-person narratives of the lives of Jona, Rachel and, to a lesser extent, Salvatore.

 

The bottom line is that this book does what good fiction is suppose to. It initially mesmerizes you, then it makes you think. This is the first book in a trilogy. I'll be reading the second book

When We Were Executioners.