Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Contributor
Curtterp
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎10-20-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

I just got a Nook a couple of weeks ago. I have been wanting to get a Kindle, but when the Nook came out, I liked the ability to read a couple of different formats instead of one format only.... that way i can get ebooks from different places and still be able to read them, instead of one place only.

 

I used to read nothing but paperbacks. I had a wall that was 4 feet across, 7 feet high with shelves built in that there spaced out mainly for books. It was filled to capacity. Then I got a divorce and lost all my books.

 

I just finished Flawless which was very intriguing. I normally read Stephen King, Dean Koontz, James Patterson, Clive Cussler, and I and wasn't sure if I would like Flawless, but I was able to download it free, and just had a lot of fun reading it.

 

I like the Nook better than paperbacks. I have only been using it a couple of weeks, but I have rediscovered the joy of reading again.

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

Stephanie, have you been reading the thousands and thousands of posts about this product, and other e-readers, on the e-reader boards?  Enlightening, to say the least.  Just some further reasons why I won't buy this product, but I'm glad you like yours.  Just think, you won't have to build any more bookcases, or knock a wall out to accommodate your ten bazillion books! 

 

I guess that means I won't be making you any more bookends?  :smileysad:  The people of the future will be saying, "What's a bookend".  Well, it was once a good thing.


Stephanie wrote:

Have you gotten your Nook yet?  Tell us about it! 


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

 


KathyS wrote:

TiggerBear wrote:

 


KathyS wrote:

Can you explain iTouch to me?


 

Touch Screen Iphone. Front surface is totally finger swipe controlled.

 

 


 

Oh, yeah...I've seen those.  A phone with internet.  My friend has one...wifi, but can't get reception in a lot of areas.  you can download books to these things?


 

oh Yes indeedy.

 

Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

Okay - first of all, the iTouch is like the iPhone only no 3G, and it's not a phone, it's an iPod that gets wifi (where ever you can get wifi, yes it works at Barnes and Noble) and you can use "apps" - short for applications - and believe me when I tell you, there's an app for everything.  My 11 year old wrote a speech on it for school this year.  :smileyhappy:  Quite a lot are free- I never buy apps.

 

Some examples: weather, world clock, email, Time, classic books, YouTube, FaceBook, Twitter, Pandora (radio), many many many games - my favorites- Cash Cab and something called Grinchmas.  I have cookbooks, USA Today, History Maps, WorldCat, etc.  It's huge. And yes, you can read books on it.  I like the B&N reader. 

 

 

 

 

 

Stephanie
Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

 


Stephanie wrote:

Okay - first of all, the iTouch is like the iPhone only no 3G, and it's not a phone, it's an iPod that gets wifi (where ever you can get wifi, yes it works at Barnes and Noble) and you can use "apps" - short for applications - and believe me when I tell you, there's an app for everything.  My 11 year old wrote a speech on it for school this year.  :smileyhappy:  Quite a lot are free- I never buy apps.

 

Some examples: weather, world clock, email, Time, classic books, YouTube, FaceBook, Twitter, Pandora (radio), many many many games - my favorites- Cash Cab and something called Grinchmas.  I have cookbooks, USA Today, History Maps, WorldCat, etc.  It's huge. And yes, you can read books on it.  I like the B&N reader. 

 


 

(chuckle) Your are right. Iphones and Ipod have gotten so close looking, I probably mixed them up. But I do know one of the touch swipe Iphones has a very nice book app. I demoed it. That app might be cross usable on all I touch swipe devices.  

 

Also the Tmobile newest phone has a book app. And I posted an article over in current events commming to the next DSI lite (that's a portable game system marketed for preteens mostly, if you were unaware), classic books in e form. Not to mention PSP had link with Marvel to pick up the comic book angle (they look and behave very nicely, better than the phone apps for comics).

 

ANY and EVERY device that can, is jummping on the Ebook wagon. This will be interesting to watch.

 

 

Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

What they all need to do is come to some sort of publishing agreement so that the books and other media can become accessible to everyone.  It's what's putting libraries in a bind when they want to acquire e-books.  Too many proprietary formats.

 

You're right- the iTouch is just like the iPhone without the phone part.  Same apps, same everything.  It's a little thinner, but otherwise they look almost exactly the same. 

 

 

Stephanie
Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

Right now it's all a big hot dust up. Everyone's using different formats. None of the readers if they even can, make it easy for you to read all formats. The product rights for consumers are still up in the air. Extreme price fluctuation between sellers and even with one seller within a week. 

 

Sadly it looks just like the MP3 scuffle of 98 to 06. That's right, took 8 years to iron out that mess. Hopefully the ebook thing will get worked out quicker. Though it looks like sellers and publishers are still marketing the same mistakes the music industry did. And look at the devastating effect that has done to the recording industry. Publishers and book marketers really should use that as a WHAT NOT TO DO list.

 

Basic downloadable content knowledge

1. People will buy the cheapest form of the product. Keep prices competitive.

2. If prices are unreasonable people will go the way of file sharing and illegal copies.

3. People want to own entirely the content they buy. Limited time, limited ability to do with it what they want; means consumers will go to the source that gives them the rights they desire.

4. Make readers capable of accessing any file format easily. You won't be able to keep those readers on the shelf.

5. Yearly reduce the price of your readers, or release a new model.

6. Do not ship a reader still on version 1 of it's software to mass market. That's what test markets are for. Otherwise you alienate your consumer base. No one wants to pay for your R&D.

7. Customer Service must know the device you are selling, you techs need available to callers. And on the month of a new readers release double or triple your call operators.

8. Limited releases for holidays cause riots.

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

Sorry I know that last post seams harsh. The subject frustrates me a little.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

 


TiggerBear wrote:

Sorry I know that last post seams harsh. The subject frustrates me a little.

 


 

Tigger -- not harsh, just the issues of this marketplace.  Some of the issues are huge enough that I am not sure that consumer preferences alone can decide the economic risks and tradeoffs the publishers (and authors) can take and when.  (Such as ownership of electronic files.)  But these last two are definitely just good basic product management:

 

6. Do not ship a reader still on version 1 of it's software to mass market. That's what test markets are for. Otherwise you alienate your consumer base. No one wants to pay for your R&D.

7. Customer Service must know the device you are selling, your techs need to be available to callers. And on the month of a new readers release double or triple your call operators.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Inspired Contributor
Purpyl
Posts: 78
Registered: ‎12-06-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

As I posted before, I own a Kindle 2. I love it & did extensive research/comparisons before buying it. (Am I upset that the price went down $100 in less than one year from my purchase? You bet.) When the Nook came out, I did not research its features because why bother? I'd already made my purchase. One thing the Nook has over the Kindle, IMO, is the ability to share books - even if it is only for 14 days. That's a drawback of ereaders. I always share my books. I'm not willing to share my Kindle. Are you listening, Amazon???!!!

 

Cathy

 

CR: City of God

JR: A Reliable Wife, The Promised World, Shutter Island

TBR: To the Lighthouse

Contributor
Madeline
Posts: 20
Registered: ‎10-21-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

Its funny my birthday is in April and for months I have been saying I want a Nook and that's all. I was still kind of indecisive about giving up actual books. Well a couple of weeks ago I was at Barnes and Noble walking through all the aisles of books and I got so emotional thinking about not buying books anymore only ebooks. Then I started thinking about sharing the books I love with my children someday and having to rip out an electronic device to show them and that disturbed me. So with tears in my eyes I decided I don't want a Nook because I don't want to not buy real books.

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

 

Madeline wrote:

Its funny my birthday is in April and for months I have been saying I want a Nook and that's all. I was still kind of indecisive about giving up actual books. Well a couple of weeks ago I was at Barnes and Noble walking through all the aisles of books and I got so emotional thinking about not buying books anymore only ebooks. Then I started thinking about sharing the books I love with my children someday and having to rip out an electronic device to show them and that disturbed me. So with tears in my eyes I decided I don't want a Nook because I don't want to not buy real books.

 

 

Madeline -- I don't see electronic books/tradtional books as an either/or proposition.  I haven't invested in one yet because I am now on an income substantially less than when I was working.  In those days, I tended to be much more of what Yankee group and other market research types call the "early adopters" -- those willing to be on the cutting edge of adopting new technology before products have gone through several generations of improvements and the cost reductions possible as the size of the market and the depreciation of research makes mass production feasible.  But several of my friends like their e-books very much and, if I were still travelling regularly, I am quite certain I would have one.

 

For now, I do like my books.  Still, storage is definitely a problem, and many of the volumes that I bought 15-30 years ago are quite brittle or at least yellowed.  There are also features that I want that I am not certain if copyright laws will ever permit me to have, so some of that I am willing to let play out for awhile. 

 

But, increasingly, my library does have books in both paper and CD editions, despite the heavy cost of the latter. While I do hope textbooks can soon be done well in e-book formats, there are children's picture books, art, special books of poetry, coffee table specials, and numerous other books that I doubt I shall want during my lifetime in other than paper or vellum formats.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

[ Edited ]

Pepper,

 

You want to know where my mind just now went, when I was about to type your name?  Paper mill! :smileyhappy:

You and Madeline both express my thoughts. 

 

Madeline, when I read what you said about your feelings, I just about cried.  I mean, really.  Your sentiments echoed mine so clearly,, but you said it so well, much better than I could. 

 

There are more than just two sides to all of this, as I think Pepper calls to our attention.

 

Where electronic devises come in, I always wait until the devise  has gone through several years of development before I make a purchase.  I know what these things are like, it's like a new toy...Until the manufacturer recalls them for some reason.  Of course, even after years of development, things can still go wrong, but in the cases of eBooks, I don't think they can over-look what the customer wants in a device that can give them clear reading....but, as we've all noticed on B&N.com, things change drastically, whether it's our wishes or not...  I'm not bashing B&N for its Nook, because everyone who's talked about it has different versions, or experiences with them, and what these people want, need, or like in an e-reader.  I'm so new to these things, I didn't even know what the "e" stood for!  The jargon, alone, for all of these new electronic devises, floors me!

 

I didn't purchase a computer until years and years went by.  And then it was given to me!  I had operated the first desk top (IBM) computer, when I was working.  I didn't like it, but it was to make the job of the engineers easier, with me programming their formulas into it.  I've operated just about every office machine that was built.   Yeah, I go back that far!   And I look back, now, and see the incredible changes that have come about.  This is the age of the electronic devises, or devises that can make both office, and homes, run more smoothly.  I'm impressed, and at times overwhelmed, but I don't run to buy these things, because I've experienced, or seen, all the changes and improvements that can happen with them.  Some simply dissapear completely!

 

I love holding something that I know is a real part of nature.  Yes,  we had to cut down some trees to get that book, but with recycalling, it can come back around.  I've explained my reasons for my love of the physical book, and it does just come down to those feelings.  Some people enjoy making notes in their books, referencing areas that can be looked at at some future time.  I can go back to my library shelf and pull out a book, during a discussion.  It doesn't have to be a book discussion, either.

 

I love to see libraries, because that's where you can bring your grandkids, like I have, and let them walk around all of these shelves of books; touch them; pick them up and see the colors of the covers and the pages filled with characters;  the excited looks on their faces when you tell them, "you can take that one home with you".   I remember exactly that, when I took my granddaughter to the library for the first time.  She was so excited!  My grandson was another story...he loved to knock the books onto the floor, and watch me pick them up!   That's my main concern, not having those experiences.  But people who buy eBooks, as we've talked about, have limited space, or money to purchase books, or they travel and need these books to read while away, etc.  Tons of reasons later.

 

The public libraries are affordable...they're free!  And you can go into a B&N and sit and read, if you want to.  They don't care, that's why the couches!  There's a bit of socializing that comes along with these rooms that house books.  You identify with readers, like yourself. You may not talk to one another, although it happens.....but it is a community, just like here.  The common denominator, why people come here to the book clubs..is to talk about that special thing that you share with someone else....a book.  No matter what form it is in, just enjoy it.

Peppermill wrote:

 

Madeline wrote:

Its funny my birthday is in April and for months I have been saying I want a Nook and that's all. I was still kind of indecisive about giving up actual books. Well a couple of weeks ago I was at Barnes and Noble walking through all the aisles of books and I got so emotional thinking about not buying books anymore only eBooks. Then I started thinking about sharing the books I love with my children someday and having to rip out an electronic device to show them and that disturbed me. So with tears in my eyes I decided I don't want a Nook because I don't want to not buy real books.

 

 

Madeline -- I don't see electronic books/traditional books as an either/or proposition.  I haven't invested in one yet because I am now on an income substantially less than when I was working.  In those days, I tended to be much more of what Yankee group and other market research types call the "early adopters" -- those willing to be on the cutting edge of adopting new technology before products have gone through several generations of improvements and the cost reductions possible as the size of the market and the depreciation of research makes mass production feasible.  But several of my friends like their e-books very much and, if I were still traveling regularly, I am quite certain I would have one.

 

For now, I do like my books.  Still, storage is definitely a problem, and many of the volumes that I bought 15-30 years ago are quite brittle or at least yellowed.  There are also features that I want that I am not certain if copyright laws will ever permit me to have, so some of that I am willing to let play out for awhile. 

 

But, increasingly, my library does have books in both paper and CD editions, despite the heavy cost of the latter. While I do hope textbooks can soon be done well in e-book formats, there are children's picture books, art, special books of poetry, coffee table specials, and numerous other books that I doubt I shall want during my lifetime in other than paper or vellum formats.

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

 

KathyS wrote (excerpt):

Pepper,

 

You want to know where my mind just now went, when I was about to type your name?  Paper mill! :smileyhappy:

You and Madeline both express my thoughts. 

 

 

 

ROFLOL!  :smileyvery-happy:

 

Only too, too appropriate!  shhh!  don't tell anyone!

 

Pepper

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Correspondent
HannibalCat
Posts: 238
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

I don't have the nook, but do have an IPod that I use to read books. I have over 100 books on it, -- so far.  I enjoy it for many reason, no the least of which is the ease of carrying it. It fits in my pocket. If my eyes get tired, I can listen to music, or another book.  I also have been approached by strangers to see what it is.

 

I don't have to hide my romance books, because that is probably the one genre I do not read. I just have never gotten into them.  The one thing that was an unexpected pleasure was that fact that you can get many great classics for free on them. Consequently, I have reread many of the classics that I probably would not have read otherwise.

 

They are great fun. Maybe some day I can afford a nook. Maybe when I get an IPhone, then I will get a nook.  I, too, am a gadget person and this day and age has been fun to be around in.

 

 

Purpyl wrote:

My Kindle has been a conversation starter. A flight attendant wanted to know all about it. A man at the airport asked me what I had in my hand. I have never seen anyone else with a Kindle or any other kind of ereader, but I would not hesitate to ask what they're reading if I did. I, too, always look at the cover of a book to see what someone's reading.

 

Cathy

 

CR: A Reliable Wife

JR: The Promised World, Shutter Island, Outlander

TBR: To the Lighthouse

 

 

Scribe
JdiennoPSU
Posts: 850
Registered: ‎03-06-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

I got my Nook for christmas and love it.  Just read Shutter Island on it last week

- JJ

Dovie'andi se tovya sagain.


FACT: Childhood cancers are the #1 disease killer in children - more than asthma, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and pediatric AIDS combined.
Frequent Contributor
Chrytech2
Posts: 28
Registered: ‎12-30-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

I received my Nook for Christmas from my wonderful husband.  I wanted the Nook because I found I was having problems with my eyes buring and the words being blurry more and more with each passing year.  I thought that being able to change the font would help.  The Nook has been great.  There is something about the eInk and it not having the back lighting that has for the most part eliminated the problems I was having.  I am reading at least 60% more since getting the Nook.  It even seems like I can read faster on the Nook. 

 

I work at a compute all day and have been told that is part of the eye problems I was having.  My son has an iPod touch and I have found it hard on my eyes.  The eInk is much better.

 

My Nook has worked perfectly since day one.  I have had non of the freezing problems some people have expressed.  I was a little disappointed with the battery life.  Even with turning the airplane mode on I have not gotten the battery life I expected. 

Contributor
Sally_Royer-Derr
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎07-06-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

I started reading ebooks when I started writing ebooks. Before that I never even considered it. I like the convenience of ebook reading, and it definitely cuts down on book clutter. However, I don't think it will ever replace the feeling you get when you open a brand new paperback or hardcover book. The physical aspect, the smell of the paper, the feel of the book gliding across your hands, all adds to the reading experience. So, for me, I like reading both ways.

 

Sally

www.sallyroyer-derr.weebly.com

 

Sally Royer-Derr
Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

Sally,

 

That sums it up for me as well.  I like my physical books, but I really appreciate the convenience of e-books, and if I'm finished with the novel I'm reading, well, there's always another a few seconds away, no matter where I am.

 

 

Sally_Royer-Derr wrote:

I started reading ebooks when I started writing ebooks. Before that I never even considered it. I like the convenience of ebook reading, and it definitely cuts down on book clutter. However, I don't think it will ever replace the feeling you get when you open a brand new paperback or hardcover book. The physical aspect, the smell of the paper, the feel of the book gliding across your hands, all adds to the reading experience. So, for me, I like reading both ways.

 

Sally

www.sallyroyer-derr.weebly.com

 

 

 

Stephanie
Inspired Wordsmith
mykoffee
Posts: 623
Registered: ‎01-24-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Nook: Who's reading electronically?

[ Edited ]

I got a nook a few weeks ago and love it!   I'm reading more than I have in years but that also means I'm spending more on books than I have in years.  I've gotten so hooked on this gadget that I've got a book coming from the library and I keep thinking I wish I was reading it on my nook instead.   I resisted the idea of ebooks for the longest time but now that I've crossed over I'm well and truly there.   I'll still purchase print books of the series I've been collecting but I'll end up getting them in ebook form too!

 

I tried both the Kindle and the Nook before making up my mind and it was a really hard decision.  Both are good, just a few features of the Nook that pushed me in that direction.   Money well spent, I haven't had this much fun in ages.  :smileyhappy:


Linda