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Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Palace of Illusions - Question 2

How does the prediction that Panchaali will change the course of history influence her character as she matures? In what way are her lessons in “the sixty-four arts that ladies must know” a challenge to her destiny? Were there predictions made by family or friends early in your life about your future? If so, how did they affect your choices as you grew up?
Stephanie
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Fozzie
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Palace of Illusions - Question 2


Stephanie wrote:
How does the prediction that Panchaali will change the course of history influence her character as she matures? In what way are her lessons in “the sixty-four arts that ladies must know” a challenge to her destiny?

I have read 250 pages out of 360, so this may contain spoilers for those not that far.

 

Despite herself, and the warnings and insights into the future that Panchaali has been given, she seems to be fulfiling her destiny, when she means to, and even when she doesn't.

 

The arts ladies must know have come in very handy during her ever changing positions in life.  She started off as a princess, had to walk barefoot to her husband's house and cook for her mother-in-law, she lived as a queen, and then was exiled to the forest for 12 years.  And, to top it all off, she had to be in hiding as a servant to a queen while she was in hiding for a year.  That brings us to where I am in the book.  Panchaali has had to be able to live in all circumstances, so she had to know how to act in all socio-economic strata.

Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Palace of Illusions - Question 2

In chapter 8, the sorceress arrives.  Panchaali is taught everything she needs to know - which is the only way she could have survived her destiny - which, as you say, she fulfilled even when she didn't know she was doing so. 

 

I learned from the sorceress myself- how important it is to be able to adapt to any situation.  I need to remember these pages and reread them occasionally.

 

However, the sorceress could not teach love.  That one has to be real, I suppose.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stephanie