Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

Bless the Child  

 

I didn't care for the movie all that much when it came out, but I'm loving the book so far.

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
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dhaupt
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf


Fozzie wrote:

The Gargoyle  

 

One of the strangest books I've ever read (so far, 85 pages in).

 

 

 

Quentins  

 

For reading in bed at night (The Gargoyle is too freaky for that).


Hi Laura, thanks for commenting. I really want to know what you think of Gargoyle when you're through. It was one of my all time favorite novels. I even invited Andrew here so I could feature it but he's in the middle of a new novel and couldn't commit.

I hope you'll be here next month when we feature Eve and talk to Iris Johansen, I'm really excited about her visit.

Thanks for visiting.

 

 

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JeremyCesarec
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Registered: ‎11-29-2010
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

test

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Winters In Bloom....again....

The Winters in Bloom  

 

I've decided to reread this novel by Lisa Tucker, I told her I would.  I rarely, if ever, reread a whole book, but I'm wondering why I just couldn't grasp this story in the way Lisa, and so many others, did.  It alludes me, what did they see, that I couldn't?  Why couldn't I like this book?  I'm always spot on with Lisa's stories. [[[sadly shaking head]]]

 

 

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1AnneB
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Re: Next

[ Edited ]

Silent in the Grave (Lady Julia Grey Series #1)  

 

 

Hi Everyone - Next is Silent In The Grave by Deanna Raybourn. It's been in my TBR pile for a while...

 

Anne

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KathyS
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Next


1AnneB wrote:

Silent in the Grave (Lady Julia Grey Series #1)  

 

 

Hi Everyone - Next is Silent In The Grave by Deanna Raybourn. It's been in my TBR pile for a while...

 

Anne



Hi Anne...Love these Silent books!

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dhaupt
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Re: Next

Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
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Re: Currently Reading

Instant City  

 

I'm just getting started on this one, but enjoying it so far.

 

This is from the B&N site

 

From the host of NPR's Morning Edition, a deeply reported portrait of Karachi, Pakistan, a city that illuminates the perils and possibilities of rapidly growing metropolises all around the world.


In recent decades, the world has seen an unprecedented shift of people from the countryside into cities. As Steve Inskeep so aptly puts it, we are now living in the age of the "instant city," when new megacities can emerge practically overnight, creating a host of unique pressures surrounding land use, energy, housing, and the environment. In his first book, the co-host of Morning Edition explores how this epic migration has transformed one of the world's most intriguing instant cities: Karachi, Pakistan.

Karachi has exploded from a colonial port town of 350,000 in 1941 to a sprawling metropolis of at least 13 million today. As the booming commercial center of Pakistan, Karachi is perhaps the largest city whose stability is a vital security concern of the United States, and yet it is a place that Americans have frequently misunderstood.

 

As Inskeep underscores, one of the great ironies of Karachi's history is that the decision to divide Pakistan and India along religious lines in 1947 only unleashed deeper divisions within the city-over religious sect, ethnic group, and political party. In Instant City, Inskeep investigates the 2009 bombing of a Shia religious procession that killed dozens of people and led to further acts of terrorism, including widespread arson at a popular market. As he discovers, the bombing is in many ways a microcosm of the numerous conflicts that divide Karachi, because people wondered if the perpetrators were motivated by religious fervor, political revenge, or simply a desire to make way for new real estate in the heart of the city. Despite the violence that frequently consumes Karachi, Inskeep finds remarkable signs of the city's tolerance, vitality, and thriving civil society-from a world-renowned ambulance service to a socially innovative project that helps residents of the vast squatter neighborhoods find their own solutions to sanitation, health care, and education.

 

Drawing on interviews with a broad cross section of Karachi residents, from ER doctors to architects to shopkeepers, Inskeep has created a vibrant and nuanced portrait of the forces competing to shape the future of one of the world's fastest growing cities.

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
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pjpick
Posts: 1,043
Registered: ‎03-16-2007
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Re: Currently Reading

This sounds interesting. Can't wait to hear what you think about it.

 


Ryan_G wrote:

Instant City  

 

I'm just getting started on this one, but enjoying it so far.

 

This is from the B&N site

 

From the host of NPR's Morning Edition, a deeply reported portrait of Karachi, Pakistan, a city that illuminates the perils and possibilities of rapidly growing metropolises all around the world.


In recent decades, the world has seen an unprecedented shift of people from the countryside into cities. As Steve Inskeep so aptly puts it, we are now living in the age of the "instant city," when new megacities can emerge practically overnight, creating a host of unique pressures surrounding land use, energy, housing, and the environment. In his first book, the co-host of Morning Edition explores how this epic migration has transformed one of the world's most intriguing instant cities: Karachi, Pakistan.

Karachi has exploded from a colonial port town of 350,000 in 1941 to a sprawling metropolis of at least 13 million today. As the booming commercial center of Pakistan, Karachi is perhaps the largest city whose stability is a vital security concern of the United States, and yet it is a place that Americans have frequently misunderstood.

 

As Inskeep underscores, one of the great ironies of Karachi's history is that the decision to divide Pakistan and India along religious lines in 1947 only unleashed deeper divisions within the city-over religious sect, ethnic group, and political party. In Instant City, Inskeep investigates the 2009 bombing of a Shia religious procession that killed dozens of people and led to further acts of terrorism, including widespread arson at a popular market. As he discovers, the bombing is in many ways a microcosm of the numerous conflicts that divide Karachi, because people wondered if the perpetrators were motivated by religious fervor, political revenge, or simply a desire to make way for new real estate in the heart of the city. Despite the violence that frequently consumes Karachi, Inskeep finds remarkable signs of the city's tolerance, vitality, and thriving civil society-from a world-renowned ambulance service to a socially innovative project that helps residents of the vast squatter neighborhoods find their own solutions to sanitation, health care, and education.

 

Drawing on interviews with a broad cross section of Karachi residents, from ER doctors to architects to shopkeepers, Inskeep has created a vibrant and nuanced portrait of the forces competing to shape the future of one of the world's fastest growing cities.


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: Currently Reading


Ryan_G wrote:

Instant City  

 

I'm just getting started on this one, but enjoying it so far.

 

This is from the B&N site

 

From the host of NPR's Morning Edition, a deeply reported portrait of Karachi, Pakistan, a city that illuminates the perils and possibilities of rapidly growing metropolises all around the world.


In recent decades, the world has seen an unprecedented shift of people from the countryside into cities. As Steve Inskeep so aptly puts it, we are now living in the age of the "instant city," when new megacities can emerge practically overnight, creating a host of unique pressures surrounding land use, energy, housing, and the environment. In his first book, the co-host of Morning Edition explores how this epic migration has transformed one of the world's most intriguing instant cities: Karachi, Pakistan.

Karachi has exploded from a colonial port town of 350,000 in 1941 to a sprawling metropolis of at least 13 million today. As the booming commercial center of Pakistan, Karachi is perhaps the largest city whose stability is a vital security concern of the United States, and yet it is a place that Americans have frequently misunderstood.

 

As Inskeep underscores, one of the great ironies of Karachi's history is that the decision to divide Pakistan and India along religious lines in 1947 only unleashed deeper divisions within the city-over religious sect, ethnic group, and political party. In Instant City, Inskeep investigates the 2009 bombing of a Shia religious procession that killed dozens of people and led to further acts of terrorism, including widespread arson at a popular market. As he discovers, the bombing is in many ways a microcosm of the numerous conflicts that divide Karachi, because people wondered if the perpetrators were motivated by religious fervor, political revenge, or simply a desire to make way for new real estate in the heart of the city. Despite the violence that frequently consumes Karachi, Inskeep finds remarkable signs of the city's tolerance, vitality, and thriving civil society-from a world-renowned ambulance service to a socially innovative project that helps residents of the vast squatter neighborhoods find their own solutions to sanitation, health care, and education.

 

Drawing on interviews with a broad cross section of Karachi residents, from ER doctors to architects to shopkeepers, Inskeep has created a vibrant and nuanced portrait of the forces competing to shape the future of one of the world's fastest growing cities.


Thanks. Ryan!  I see the pub date is listed as 10/13/2011!  I have sent a heads up on to several in my personal circle of reader-friends who might be interested in a book like this one.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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kimba88
Posts: 790
Registered: ‎01-05-2011
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dhaupt
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Re: Currently Reading


kimba88 wrote:

The Evil Inside  


Ooh that was a good one Kimba and a great choice for October

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Tegerian
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-12-2011
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

The Mask of Troy  

 

 


 

Dead Six  

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kimba88
Posts: 790
Registered: ‎01-05-2011
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

Thrown Out 

Dearly, Departed   

 

 

Thrown out is a little collection of short stories.

 

I am super excited about starting the ARC I received of Dearly, Departed. Steampunk, fantasy, romance and Zombies..oh my!

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dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf


Tegerian wrote:

The Mask of Troy  

 

 


 

Dead Six  


Hi Tegerian, and welcome to the board.

Let us know how you liked your choices and I hope to see you here often.

 

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dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf


kimba88 wrote:

Thrown Out 

Dearly, Departed   

 

 

Thrown out is a little collection of short stories.

 

I am super excited about starting the ARC I received of Dearly, Departed. Steampunk, fantasy, romance and Zombies..oh my!


Kimba, Dearly Departed looks good, I'll wait for your take on it

 

Right now i'm about half way finished with

Until There Was You  It comes out next Tuesday and it is so good, touching, funny, romantic and laugh out loud hilarious at times too.

Kristan is one of my very favorite romance authors

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dhaupt
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Currently Reading

[ Edited ]

Peppermill wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

Instant City by Steve Inskeep

 

I'm just getting started on this one, but enjoying it so far.

 

This is from the B&N site

 

From the host of NPR's Morning Edition, a deeply reported portrait of Karachi, Pakistan, a city that illuminates the perils and possibilities of rapidly growing metropolises all around the world.


In recent decades, the world has seen an unprecedented shift of people from the countryside into cities. As Steve Inskeep so aptly puts it, we are now living in the age of the "instant city," when new megacities can emerge practically overnight, creating a host of unique pressures surrounding land use, energy, housing, and the environment. In his first book, the co-host of Morning Edition explores how this epic migration has transformed one of the world's most intriguing instant cities: Karachi, Pakistan.

Karachi has exploded from a colonial port town of 350,000 in 1941 to a sprawling metropolis of at least 13 million today. As the booming commercial center of Pakistan, Karachi is perhaps the largest city whose stability is a vital security concern of the United States, and yet it is a place that Americans have frequently misunderstood.

 

As Inskeep underscores, one of the great ironies of Karachi's history is that the decision to divide Pakistan and India along religious lines in 1947 only unleashed deeper divisions within the city-over religious sect, ethnic group, and political party. In Instant City, Inskeep investigates the 2009 bombing of a Shia religious procession that killed dozens of people and led to further acts of terrorism, including widespread arson at a popular market. As he discovers, the bombing is in many ways a microcosm of the numerous conflicts that divide Karachi, because people wondered if the perpetrators were motivated by religious fervor, political revenge, or simply a desire to make way for new real estate in the heart of the city. Despite the violence that frequently consumes Karachi, Inskeep finds remarkable signs of the city's tolerance, vitality, and thriving civil society-from a world-renowned ambulance service to a socially innovative project that helps residents of the vast squatter neighborhoods find their own solutions to sanitation, health care, and education.

 

Drawing on interviews with a broad cross section of Karachi residents, from ER doctors to architects to shopkeepers, Inskeep has created a vibrant and nuanced portrait of the forces competing to shape the future of one of the world's fastest growing cities.


Thanks. Ryan!  I see the pub date is listed as 10/13/2011!  I have sent a heads up on to several in my personal circle of reader-friends who might be interested in a book like this one.


I picked this up at my library Tuesday and am on Chapter 10.  If you know as little about Pakistan as I do, this is definitely a read to consider adding to yours.  It reads quickly and introduces one to lots of bits of history and recent fact and conditions.  The style is journalistic.  Sometimes one gets diverted into the stories of "instant cities" elsewhere on the globe, but Inskeep soon brings the reader back to Karachi.  With Pakistan in the news and such a critical, rogue player on the world scene, we probably all need to understand that country and its history better.

 

In looking at reviews today, I found these others may be of interest on the area, each book with its strengths and weaknesses, not all readily available "new":

 

The Great Partition by Yasmin Khan

 

The Shadow of the Great Game by Narendra Singh Sarila

 

India  by Patrick French, also, Liberty or Death

 

Of course, the great fiction modern classic on Partition (or at least one of them) is:

 

Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie

 

I finally read this a few years ago, and hope to reread it some day.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

[ Edited ]

The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood (Sterling Unabridged Classics Series)  by Howard Pyle

 

I raided the Juvenile Books section at the library for this one.  Don't know that I shall get it all read, but it is fun to see the parallels and differences with the Outlaw we are currently discussing.

 

That Used to Be Us  by Thomas L. Friedman and Michael Mandelbaum

 

May have mentioned I bought this when B&N offered a special.  Good read!  I recommend it.  My copy has lots of underlines, and I even bought a second copy to share -- my reading copy will also "circulate" when I finish it.  (I don't always agree, but that is part of the fun of the marginalia and the discussions to come.)

 

The Final Storm by Jeff Shaara

 

This is my "new" listening book for the days ahead.  First chapter was great.  Shaara (and his father) know how to write about wars.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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dhaupt
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf


Peppermill wrote:

The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood (Sterling Unabridged Classics Series)  by Howard Pyle

 

I raided the Juvenile Books section at the library for this one.  Don't know that I shall get it all read, but it is fun to see the parallels and differences with the Outlaw we are currently discussing.

 

 

 

thanks Pepper, I bet we'd all be interested in the differences. I hope you'll share