Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

The Gift of Rain  

 

About 130 pages in.  Great so far!

Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

[ Edited ]

I think authors are taking us back to WWII times recently.  I just had a strange juxtaposition.  As I have mentioned elsewhere, I have been listening to:

 

The Final Storm  by Jeff Shaara, which is a fictional account of the last days of the war in the Pacific and includes the horrific battles at Okinawa and the bombing of Hiroshima.

 

By coincidence, I recovered a mislaid book, about 2/3 of which I had already read.  I sat and reread it last night and finished it this morning:

 

Snow Country  by Yasunari Kawabata; Edward Seidensticker,  Translator

 

Kawabata was born in 1899, took his own life in 1972, received the Nobel in literature in 1968.  This story seems to be about a rich dilettante who leaves his family year after year  to visit a resort in the snow country of Japan, a place  known for its simple Geisha girls, where he meets the same woman each trip, but not always without betrayal.  What is particularly haunting me today is what the relationship of the story to the years in history in which Kawabata lived.  The introductory notes do not suggest that there is one.

 

I would love to hear comments from anyone who has read/studied this story.  It is definitely a read that I would recommend.  The writing is compared to haiku.  Time and place are not always easy to decipher.  There is a fascinating digression on chijimi.

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mboogiedown/2124216349/

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mu87wIliMwk

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4KXbotKCG_M&feature=relmfu




"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf


Peppermill wrote:

I think authors are taking us back to WWII times recently.  I just had a strange juxtaposition.  As I have mentioned elsewhere, I have been listening to:

 

The Final Storm  by Jeff Shaara, which is a fictional account of the last days of the war in the Pacific and includes the horrific battles at Okinawa and the bombing of Hiroshima.

 

By coincidence, I recovered a mislaid book, about 2/3 of which I had already read.  I sat and reread it last night and finished it this morning:

 

Snow Country  by Yasunari Kawabata; Edward Seidensticker,  Translator

 

Kawabata was born in 1899, took his own life in 1972, received the Nobel in literature in 1968.  This story seems to be about a rich dilettante who leaves his family year after year  to visit a resort in the snow country of Japan, a place  known for its simple Geisha girls, where he meets the same woman each trip, but not always without betrayal.  What is particularly haunting me today is what the relationship of the story to the years in history in which Kawabata lived.  The introductory notes do not suggest that there is one.

 

I would love to hear comments from anyone who has read/studied this story.  It is definitely a read that I would recommend.  The writing is compared to haiku.  Time and place are not always easy to decipher.  There is a fascinating digression on chijimi.

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mboogiedown/2124216349/

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mu87wIliMwk

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4KXbotKCG_M&feature=relmfu





Hi Pepper, I haven't read the book but I do agree with you that there are a lot of recent WWII novels out there right now, in fact our February 2012 feature is about WWII Paris Noire.

Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008

Re: Currently Reading

This is the review I posted on the blog:

 

Have I ever told you guys how much I love my sense of humor.  It tends to lean towards the darker side of things, which is why I find some circumstances funnier than most will.  I guess a perfect example, a short one anyway, is from the movie Titanic.  I'm sure you know which one I'm talking about, though I didn't really enjoy it that much.  There is one moment that cracks me up every time I see it though.  When the boat is sinking, tail end up in the air, passengers start to fall like confetti.  There is one in particular that makes me laugh out loud, I know it's callous but sorry.  It's the guy who falls and hits the propeller blade, the thunking sounds he makes sends me into stitches.  Now you might say I'm morbid, but it will give you an insight into why I loved this book so much.

I'm not saying that I laughed out loud the entire time I was reading it, because I didn't.  But I did find a lot of it humorous enough to say this was one of the most entertaining books I've read in a long time.  Jean is one of those rare characters that I love despite everything that she does.  She is a woman lost in pain who decides on being practical for the first time in her life.  Unfortunately for her friends, that means killing them off before they grow old and suffer in the way her mother did.

It was a joy and a thrill to to watch the internal conflict as she meandered her way and started knocking of those closest to her.  The only stipulation is that she has to make them as happy as she can before she does it.  In once case that involves sleeping with the one that has had a thing for her since college.  I love the way Jean is able to twist herself in an elaborate pretzel in order to justify what she is doing.  Much like Serial Mom and those college kids from The Last Supper, Jean starts off doing what she thinks is right and just.  For the most part, she is firm in that thinking by the end as well.  She has her moments of doubt, but all it takes is remembering the pain and suffering her mother went through for Jean to realize she is on the right path no matter the consequences to herself.

This was a wonderfully complex and inspired look at friendship and morality in an age where both things seem to be expendable.   The author, through dark humor and brilliant writing, was able to bring Jean and her friends to life in such a way that made me want to be Jean's friend, despite the risk.

 


pjpick wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

Practical Jean  



Wow, that's definitely an original plot! I know the perfect person to recommend this to. LOL! Can't wait to hear your opinion of it.




"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
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Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
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Re: Currently Reading

Camp Nine  

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Currently Reading


Ryan_G wrote:

Camp Nine  


Ryan, thanks for sharing your review and for taking time out of your schedule to visit the forum. I appreciate it and look forward to your reviews here and I also read them on your blog

Thanks again

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dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Currently Reading

I just finished and reviewed

A Home by the Sea  

you know me, romance buff that I am I loved it.

http://thereadingfrenzy.blogspot.com/2011/11/review-of-home-by-sea-by-christina-skye.html

 

I also just finished Marilyn Brant's newest novel which will be out in early December

A Summer in Europe  

my review will be up tomorrow, it was fabulous and I've invited her back to feature it in May. She was with us last year so many of you may remember her.

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1AnneB
Posts: 848
Registered: ‎08-03-2009
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Re: Currently Reading

Holy Warrior  

 

 

Hi Everyone - I just finished the next book in Angus Donald's Robin Hood series - Holy Warrior. I really liked it. Angus is really a good storyteller and his characters are wonderfully drawn. Since there was a huge battle and many other smaller ones, it was quite bloody, but essential and true to the history of the events. I've also downloaded the next book in the series, but I have many others to read next. Happy Reading...

 

Anne

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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Currently Reading


Ryan_G wrote:

This is the review I posted on the blog:

 

Have I ever told you guys how much I love my sense of humor.  It tends to lean towards the darker side of things, which is why I find some circumstances funnier than most will.  I guess a perfect example, a short one anyway, is from the movie Titanic.  I'm sure you know which one I'm talking about, though I didn't really enjoy it that much.  There is one moment that cracks me up every time I see it though.  When the boat is sinking, tail end up in the air, passengers start to fall like confetti.  There is one in particular that makes me laugh out loud, I know it's callous but sorry.  It's the guy who falls and hits the propeller blade, the thunking sounds he makes sends me into stitches.  Now you might say I'm morbid, but it will give you an insight into why I loved this book so much.

I'm not saying that I laughed out loud the entire time I was reading it, because I didn't.  But I did find a lot of it humorous enough to say this was one of the most entertaining books I've read in a long time.  Jean is one of those rare characters that I love despite everything that she does.  She is a woman lost in pain who decides on being practical for the first time in her life.  Unfortunately for her friends, that means killing them off before they grow old and suffer in the way her mother did.

It was a joy and a thrill to to watch the internal conflict as she meandered her way and started knocking of those closest to her.  The only stipulation is that she has to make them as happy as she can before she does it.  In once case that involves sleeping with the one that has had a thing for her since college.  I love the way Jean is able to twist herself in an elaborate pretzel in order to justify what she is doing.  Much like Serial Mom and those college kids from The Last Supper, Jean starts off doing what she thinks is right and just.  For the most part, she is firm in that thinking by the end as well.  She has her moments of doubt, but all it takes is remembering the pain and suffering her mother went through for Jean to realize she is on the right path no matter the consequences to herself.

This was a wonderfully complex and inspired look at friendship and morality in an age where both things seem to be expendable.   The author, through dark humor and brilliant writing, was able to bring Jean and her friends to life in such a way that made me want to be Jean's friend, despite the risk.

 


pjpick wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

Practical Jean  by Trevor Cole



Wow, that's definitely an original plot! I know the perfect person to recommend this to. LOL! Can't wait to hear your opinion of it.


Thanks for posting your review here, Ryan, especially since I don't have  yours or really any other book review blogs on my regular scan list!

 

Just listened to the Great Course's take on Crime and Punishment.  Your review makes Practical Jean sound like a 2011 version (perhaps a sitcom rip?), i.e., decent person committing crime towards "good" purposes!

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Currently Reading


1AnneB wrote:

Holy Warrior  

 

 

Hi Everyone - I just finished the next book in Angus Donald's Robin Hood series - Holy Warrior. I really liked it. Angus is really a good storyteller and his characters are wonderfully drawn. Since there was a huge battle and many other smaller ones, it was quite bloody, but essential and true to the history of the events. I've also downloaded the next book in the series, but I have many others to read next. Happy Reading...

 

Anne


Thanks Anne, are you all powered up no loss of lights. How much snow is still on the ground

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1AnneB
Posts: 848
Registered: ‎08-03-2009
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Re: Currently Reading


dhaupt wrote:

1AnneB wrote:

Holy Warrior  

 

 

Hi Everyone - I just finished the next book in Angus Donald's Robin Hood series - Holy Warrior. I really liked it. Angus is really a good storyteller and his characters are wonderfully drawn. Since there was a huge battle and many other smaller ones, it was quite bloody, but essential and true to the history of the events. I've also downloaded the next book in the series, but I have many others to read next. Happy Reading...

 

Anne


Thanks Anne, are you all powered up no loss of lights. How much snow is still on the ground


Hi Debbie - We lost power for about 28 hours but my sister lives in upstate CT and she just got her power back about 2 hours ago. She came down here to get warm !!! We only got about 3 inches, but 10 miles north got 10 or more inches !!! All things considered, we got lucky !!

 

Anne

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optic_i
Posts: 750
Registered: ‎06-26-2011
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Re: Currently Reading

Hi Anne & Debbie,

 

Hi Anne, I'm also in CT. I'm glad your sister has power now but we're still on generator. At least now we have cable and Internet, so it's a start anyway. It's been surreal; it's almost been seven days, and it seems like longer. But still, many towns are out near the northern border. My daughter moved to the southern part of the state recently and she was lucky and never lost power. We got about a foot of snow but it melted quickly and now it's almost all gone.   :smileyhappy:

 

Optic

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dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Currently Reading

Optic, I'm so sorry to hear that you're still without Power, generators are wonderful things. We have one here at home and it's helped immensely sometimes. But without my gas fireplace we would have had to seek refuge elsewhere a number of times in the cold.

I hope you're restored soon.

You are in my thoughts as are all the people still in the dark.

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optic_i
Posts: 750
Registered: ‎06-26-2011
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Re: Currently Reading


dhaupt wrote:

Optic, I'm so sorry to hear that you're still without Power, generators are wonderful things. We have one here at home and it's helped immensely sometimes. But without my gas fireplace we would have had to seek refuge elsewhere a number of times in the cold.

I hope you're restored soon.

You are in my thoughts as are all the people still in the dark.


Thank you Debbie, thats nice to hear !   :smileyhappy:    Optic

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1AnneB
Posts: 848
Registered: ‎08-03-2009
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Re: Currently Reading


optic_i wrote:

Hi Anne & Debbie,

 

Hi Anne, I'm also in CT. I'm glad your sister has power now but we're still on generator. At least now we have cable and Internet, so it's a start anyway. It's been surreal; it's almost been seven days, and it seems like longer. But still, many towns are out near the northern border. My daughter moved to the southern part of the state recently and she was lucky and never lost power. We got about a foot of snow but it melted quickly and now it's almost all gone.   :smileyhappy:

 

Optic


Hi Optic - Sorry to hear the you've been without power so long - Hope it's back by now (Sun. AM) I was just sitting hear listening to all the news reports - we here in SW CT had it easy compared to others in the CT.

 

Anne

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optic_i
Posts: 750
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Re: Currently Reading


1AnneB wrote:

optic_i wrote:

Hi Anne & Debbie,

 

Hi Anne, I'm also in CT. I'm glad your sister has power now but we're still on generator. At least now we have cable and Internet, so it's a start anyway. It's been surreal; it's almost been seven days, and it seems like longer. But still, many towns are out near the northern border. My daughter moved to the southern part of the state recently and she was lucky and never lost power. We got about a foot of snow but it melted quickly and now it's almost all gone.   :smileyhappy:

 

Optic


Hi Optic - Sorry to hear the you've been without power so long - Hope it's back by now (Sun. AM) I was just sitting hear listening to all the news reports - we here in SW CT had it easy compared to others in the CT.

 

Anne



Hi Anne,

 

Thanks, no power here yet though part of my town has power now. It's been a long week!  We might have to wait till Wednesday.  Everyone says it could be worse. It could have happened in January when it's freezing. I really don't want a repeat of last winter. Somehow I feel like we are in Disasters 101 and I don't remember signing up.   :smileyhappy:

 

Optic

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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
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Re: Currently Reading

Somehow I feel like we are in Disasters 101 and I don't remember signing up.   :smileyhappy:

 

Hurricanes, earthquakes, October snowstorms, .....

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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KaycKC
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-22-2011
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

The One You Love   by Paul Pilkington is what I am currently reading, and I have no idea what will be next. I never know until that night when I get ready to read, doesn't matter what is on my shelf, has to hit me when it is time. I'm sure it will be a suspense novel though, seems to be what I lean towards.

http://www.kaydenlee.com

Laugh, cry . . . feel.
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dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

Pepper, how true it is about all the disasters we've experienced in the last year or so. Let's hope for a very non-eventful weather year in 2012, I think we deserve it.

 

Kayden, that novel looks very good, be sure and tell us why you liked it when you're done.

 

Right now I'm reading

An O'Brien Family Christmas  

and am enjoying it very much as the whole family goes to Dublin for the Holidays.

 

Over the weekend I read two of my books for the February issue of RT magazine

and finished

Winging It  

by our good friend and past featured author Deborah Cooke. It's book two of her new YA Pyr series.

 

you can read my review here

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barry2B
Posts: 124
Registered: ‎11-17-2010
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Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

The Tehran Initiative 

 

I am currently reading this. Joel is one of my favorite authors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Brotherhood (Precinct 11 Series #1)